Need help; Taking over care of a 3yr old Veiled

Poptartjake

New Member
Hi, my names Brandon. I am currently trying to get ready for a 3 year old male Veiled that someone needed to rehome. Being an avid animal lover, and especially when it comes to something off the beaten path of dogs and cats. The owner seems to have a decent knowledge of Chameleon care (even though their grammar is that of an elementary student...) but being a very methodical person when it comes to anything, I want to provide the absolute best care that I can. Currently, I know he is being kept in a 5ft x 3ft x ??ft bird cage (Ewww, I know) and I have no idea what the foliage setup/branch setup is. I don't know much about what I am going to be receiving with the cage and Cham, but I hope they have separate UVB and heat lamps. Not sure about mister/dripper setup either unfortunately... This will be the first Cham I have cared for, though I have had other reptiles in the past. Any advice is appreciated.

NOTE: Pictures are on the last post of page 2!
 

Poptartjake

New Member
@Kate: Thanks for the advice as of submitting a help forum, I will make sure and do that once I have more info. I have read over caresheets and most everything else I can get my hands on.

My biggest worries are coming from Transportation, Setting up his cage once I get him and everything together (I do not currently have anything he could just move into), having food on-hand, and everything else I know I need to be aware of/have ready...

He will be coming TOMORROW if I can get everything ready. I am just nervous that I will forget something.

ALSO: He is a 3 year old male that is known to be aggressive. Seeing as I estimate him at close to, if not over 20 inches, I worry about getting bit. Not to the point that I am afraid to put my hand in his cage but I also understand that they are easily stressed which can put quite a load on them mentally.
 

mychamtini112012

New Member
What's is so gross about the bird cage.? I know members have housed their chameleon in one on here before, and I was looking at buying one for my future chameleon as well...

Chameleons aren't really touch and play with animals, so you won't wwant him out a lot. If you MUST get him out, for cage cleanings, vet trips, ect., you can try to get him on a stick and then place him somewhere until the cage is clean or in a box/transporting device.
 

Kate

Established Member
The bird cage will do for a short time, till you get something else. The problem with it will be your basking temp and humidity with it being open. If you can't get anything more suitable soon you could cover three sides with plastic shower curtain. Depending on where you live he may be happy in his cage. The care sheets on here are very new and were mostly written by a vet on the forum. For handling ,I would leave him to settle for a week or two, then try hand feeding. Using a stick as mentioned and if all else fails, a glove.:D
 

mychamtini112012

New Member
I don't think the basking temp would be hard, as long as it is shining on a branch or something that he can climb up to and reach. And with many who have used bird cages they cover the sides with screen, so it's just as open as any chameleon cage. Just larger, which if you move your guy from that huge cage to a smaller one he might be unhappy. If humidity is that big of a deal you can cover it with a shower curtain as said by Kate.
 

Poptartjake

New Member
One of my biggest worries is feeding within the open cage. The only thing I could think of was either covering the sides as suggested above, or using a feeding cup but seeing he is already 3 years old I don't know how well he will take to this if it hasn't been done before.
 

mychamtini112012

New Member
I would suggest just covering the sides, that'll be easier as sometimes the crickets can climb the walls if you just use a cup. If you can cover the sides with screen and/or a shower curtain, I think he would love that a lot more than moving him to a smaller 'reptile' cage you can buy.
 

junglefries

Avid Member
info

Make a notebook or journal. whenever you read something for info, write it down. it's hard to find anyone who agrees on all the same parameters. one source will say one temp or rh while another says something different. that way if your unsure you go with the average of the two. you will find varying info on egg incubation times and longevity, basking temps, life expectancy, overall cham length, etc... you name it, hardly ever will you read the exact same numbers or opinion. just a different take on looking for input.
 

Poptartjake

New Member
Make a notebook or journal. whenever you read something for info, write it down. it's hard to find anyone who agrees on all the same parameters. one source will say one temp or rh while another says something different. that way if your unsure you go with the average of the two. you will find varying info on egg incubation times and longevity, basking temps, life expectancy, overall cham length, etc... you name it, hardly ever will you read the exact same numbers or opinion. just a different take on looking for input.

I agree 100% with this. I have found so many variations at this point that I will be going with what I feel comfortable with. I fully expect him to be absolutely livid about the move and to just hate me for the next couple of months. Especially since the current owners report that he is aggressive. I foresee lots of hand feeding and coaxing over the next while.

EDIT: Also, does anyone have experience with Chams and smoking?.. I kinda assume as long as there isn't smoke being blown in their direction it shouldn't bother them but I need to know everything I can.
 
What's is so gross about the bird cage.? I know members have housed their chameleon in one on here before, and I was looking at buying one for my future chameleon as well...

Chameleons aren't really touch and play with animals, so you won't wwant him out a lot. If you MUST get him out, for cage cleanings, vet trips, ect., you can try to get him on a stick and then place him somewhere until the cage is clean or in a box/transporting device.


That's a bunch of hog wash...
They don't want to be PET or squeezed etc. kids shouldn't really handle them but yes they should be taken out and yes you should bond with your Cham.
Of course don't force them to come out or be around you, let them venture off and keep an eye on them.
I've handled my boys since they were 3-4 months old and both will willingly come to my hand every time I open their enclosures. Intact my veiled will some times race to get to my hand and then willingly hang out by me the whole time he's out.
The biggest part of this is knowing how to approach a chameleon and knowing your chameleons personality.
 

mychamtini112012

New Member
I wouldn't say its hog wash. That's great that your chameleons are that nice, but you've had them sense they were three months old. This chameleon is three years old, and too much could stress him out to an unhealthy level. If he wants to try and work by hand feeding him ect to try and get a bond to where the cham will come out, that's great. Over time of course. But that doesn't mean the cham will be all friendly with work. Some just don't like too be touched and never will be. They aren't dogs or cats.

I had Tini for six months, and did all I could to try and get a bond with her. Did the hand feeding and all the tips and all the ways to approach. Only I fed her and cared for her. It didn't matter, she didn't like it. So no, its not a bunch of hog wash.
 

mychamtini112012

New Member
I wouldn't say its hog wash. That's great that your chameleons are that nice, but you've had them sense they were three months old. This chameleon is three years old, and too much could stress him out to an unhealthy level. If he wants to try and work by hand feeding him ect to try and get a bond to where the cham will come out, that's great. Over time of course. But that doesn't mean the cham will be all friendly with work. Some just don't like too be touched and never will be. They aren't dogs or cats.

I had Tini for six months, and did all I could to try and get a bond with her. Did the hand feeding and all the tips and all the ways to approach. Only I fed her and cared for her. It didn't matter, she didn't like it. So no, its not a bunch of hog wash.
 

DanSB

Avid Member
To handle or not to handle... There isn't a right answer here and both sides are hogwash. It is highly dependant on two different things: the chameleon and the keeper. Calm gentle people who are not prone to quick movements are more likely to successfully handle a chameleon, and chameleons have personalities and varying degrees of comfort with people. You can't make a blanket statement that either way is right.

Smoking around your chameleons is bad. I am not an anti smoking crazy, in fact I am an avid tobacco consumer, but chameleons are sensitive to air quality. I say don't even smoke in the same room and thoroughly wash your hands before handling feeders or anything that will contact your chameleon. I personally only smoke outside, and run a high quality hepa filter in the Cham area.

I agree bird cages are fine, for feeding do a search on this site for "sunny D feeding cup". Those work great and will contain most feeders, even crix.
 
To handle or not to handle... There isn't a right answer here and both sides are hogwash. It is highly dependant on two different things: the chameleon and the keeper. Calm gentle people who are not prone to quick movements are more likely to successfully handle a chameleon, and chameleons have personalities and varying degrees of comfort with people. You can't make a blanket statement that either way is right.

Smoking around your chameleons is bad. I am not an anti smoking crazy, in fact I am an avid tobacco consumer, but chameleons are sensitive to air quality. I say don't even smoke in the same room and thoroughly wash your hands before handling feeders or anything that will contact your chameleon. I personally only smoke outside, and run a high quality hepa filter in the Cham area.

I agree bird cages are fine, for feeding do a search on this site for "sunny D feeding cup". Those work great and will contain most feeders, even crix.

I already said a key point is the personality.

I've already helped a handful of members on here learn to properly approach a chameleon with the way I do it and their chams have been more willing and friendly since then.
You mainly have to be paitent and very consistent with a proper routine.

However this statement seems very intense and that's why I said its hogwash..


"Chameleons aren't really touch and play with animals, so you won't wwant him out a lot. If you MUST get him out, for cage cleanings, vet trips, ect., you can try to get him on a stick and then place him somewhere"
 

mychamtini112012

New Member
The reason why it was so intense was because he mentioned he was buying himself an aggressive chameleon. If he was a baby, it would be different. I had a baby veiled as well, and he was handle because he was fine with it.

I guess I should reword it as the chameleon should not be handled if it stresses them too much.
 

Poptartjake

New Member
First off, I love the response and passion of everyone on this forum. :D Keep it up! Now, I agree with everything said in this forum aside from the blanket statement that Cham's aren't sociable pets. Some are, some aren't. I understand that this one in particular is most likely going to hate me for the first few weeks to months, at least on some level. Maybe his current owners just aren't Cham people. I don't honestly know and won't until I get him.

I plan to always offer everything from a stance that puts me under his eye level. I read a post earlier that I believe was from Olivia that talked about placing your hand completely flat against the Cham's belly starting at the highest part of their leg and moving 1/3rd the way down, letting the Cham do the other 2/3rds? I was a bit lost on that part but I do understand to never pick them up by their backs, always the belly. I would prefer if he would eventually just want to walk up my arm.

On a bit of a side note...We have cat that we've had since he was a kitten and as he grew up, he hated EVERYONE. But, eventually he came to accept me as his official owner or maybe an equal of some sort. Anyways, to this day when he walks into the house he comes straight to my doorway to wait for me to give him food (assuming he is out, but sometimes he just comes to say hi). I am willing to take a chance on this Cham. :)
 
Obviously the biggest issue is stressing him out, since he's coming from an environment that made him anxious It will be a big help to move. In my opinion veileds seem to be sensitive to their setups.. They need a lot of room ao preferably 3ft wide 3 ft deep and 5 high would be a good setup. It will allow him to have room to roam and hide. This should help with him getting used to a new place. When a chameleon feels free they will not be as willing to act out. As for all animals.. We all known veileds are very territorial so its best to hold off on reaching INTO his enclosure until he knows you. An hour or two before bed time when he's exhausted- open the door and let him venture out. Try not to go for him once he is out of the enclosure, let him roam for a good 20-30 minutes. Also do not stare or sit by the enclosure, act busy like you are watching tv or playing on a computer. You will want to be sitting still because movement may frighten him. GENERALLY once veileds are out of their cage they act like a whole different chameleon. When its time for bed make sure when you approach him that you do not stand and kneel down, try to be level at all times or even slightly below him if he's on something. (Chameleons in the wild when battling for territory will try to reach higher ground than the other and show dominance) also move slowly and watch his reaction- if he puffs up and turns colors he is probably frightened or mad. If he stays the same size I would continue forward. If you get to the point of being able to touch him- you will want to keep your hand at his feet level and slowly slide it under his stomach 1/3 of the way and let him climb on.
Trusting you can take months to a year but consistency will help greatly.

Chameleons are smart enough period to learn to be sociable to many different degrees, just as many pitbulls who fight have been turned into family dogs. Don't let anyone discourage you from helping your Cham be a nice guy!
 

Poptartjake

New Member
These are the only two pics the owner sent me. Only thing that really stuck out to me was the fact that he appears to be or have shedded recently. Pics are 1-2 weeks old they said.

I was planning on feeding him at breakfast every day, and then lunch on monday, wednesday, friday, saturday and sunday at the same time if possible. But Tuesday and Thursdays I won't be able to feed him until 5:30pm or later which means he will be going 12-16 hours without food. I read that Veiled's will eat lettuce, so I was going to try that.
 

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