Getting the 411

Swimmer522

New Member
:confused:Soo new to this herp forum and not quite sure where to post this.
Anyways hi! Down to brass tacks. I won some tickets to Repticon in Boise, ID and have decided / the bf agreed, that I can get a chameleon. The con isn't till Sept so time to do research! Any help with setup, what cham to get, anything else I might be missing would be wonderful!

Some basic info: I have a beardie, will be 2 yrs on Christmas day and I've had her a year n half. Name is Hash. I also have a corn snake, named Xena, and I've had her for about 2 years. I have also had green anoles, grass lizards, fire belly toads and newts, cats, dogs. So I am experienced with reptiles.

Looking for maybe a veiled or panther? Also does anyone even know if the Boise Repticon would even have chams?

Thank you all so much!
-Kristina
 

VigilantSpearIII

New Member
Sup...Used to live in Filer, but never went to a repticon in Boise. Most expo's have chams for sale. Just check the resources tab in the top left for all of your basic care guides. Prepare with cages, lights, and temps/humidity, etc. I would start with a Veiled, they are just a hardier (not to mention cheaper) chameleon. Go with CB over WC chameleons, less worries about parasites etc. A good price is 35-75 for a Veiled, 100-200 for a Panther. careful not to get suckered by people claiming that Veiled chams have morphs or things like that. They are not like B-Dragons in that area. Try to get a juvenile cham, I know its sad, but chams have relatively short lives and a younger cham will allow you to get more bang for your buck. Check the cham thoroughly, warts, scars, sunken eyes, wrinkly skin, bowed limbs are all bad signs. Good cham hunting, hope you have a good catch!
 

Swimmer522

New Member
Thank you for the information. Upon reading the link I have a few questions.
1. What wattage basking bulb would best?
2. For veggies for a veiled would it be the same as a beardie? (i.e kale, collards, mustard greens, strawberries)
3. Why am I unable to view the tab for health?
 

VigilantSpearIII

New Member
Thank you for the information. Upon reading the link I have a few questions.
1. What wattage basking bulb would best?
2. For veggies for a veiled would it be the same as a beardie? (i.e kale, collards, mustard greens, strawberries)
3. Why am I unable to view the tab for health?
1. 50-75 watts, depends on the distance.
2. This is a place of controversy, I personally never feed my Veiled chams any types of vegetables. I believe that all chams are insectivores and they will only eat plant matter when they are trying to hydrate. I have tried to feed my Veileds veggies in the past and all but one ate them. Since then I have raised without veggies and I have seen no adverse effects. Others will tell you that they can eat veggies and that mustard greens, kale, and carrots are good. My B-dragons also, do not eat too many veggies. Keep a varied diet and gut load all insects to avoid Vit. A and D deficiencies.
3.Dunno, it has a lock on it because we are Junior members. I guess its for full members only.
 

Olimpia

Biologist & Ecologist
Thank you for the information. Upon reading the link I have a few questions.
1. What wattage basking bulb would best?
2. For veggies for a veiled would it be the same as a beardie? (i.e kale, collards, mustard greens, strawberries)
3. Why am I unable to view the tab for health?
I'm glad to see a member doing research prior to getting their chameleon! Great for you!

1. The wattage will depend on what you need to achieve the idea basking temp, because each home is different. So say you're aiming for a basking temp of 80F, a 40w bulb might be enough. If you run the AC a lot, perhaps a 60w might be better. I recommend getting those multi-packs from any Home Depot or Walmart for a few dollars of several incandescent bulbs and testing them out. And even if you don't use the higher wattage ones right now, come winter when your house is cooler you'll be able to switch it out.

2. Yes, everything that is good and healthy for a beardie is great for a veiled as well. These are going to be great gutloading foods for your insects, but I'm sure you know that already. There is no controversy in this subject, veileds are avid eaters of plant matter because in the wild this is how they would gain moisture (they live in a dry area) and it's part of their normal diet, and LOVE eating things like strawberries and other things as treats. They also adore hibiscus plants and flowers, and these make great treat greens for them too.

3. I think perhaps the health section is still being finished up. I can see it but I'm a mod, so I don't know if it's restricted to certain people right now. But I believe a few details are still being tweaked and it may not be 100% ready to reveal yet.

And to answer a previous question (of choosing between a veiled or a panther) go with the one you want the most. Both are great species, pretty much equally as hardy, and their care is practically identical. The difference will come down to cost and preference, so choose the one you're more excited about living with for the next 4-8 years! :)

And here is my blog on what to look out for when buying from a reptile show
 

VigilantSpearIII

New Member
Thank you all for the information. So for the cage I was thinking of making something like this http://www.instructables.com/files/deriv/FBP/3982/FU6LWT6U/FBP3982FU6LWT6U.LARGE.jpg for the general design but using wood instead of aluminum or plastic. I've been reading that oak or birch will be the best type of wood but what would be the best type of sealer would be best to water proof it.
Lin-seed oil or flax-seed oil, I have not used it for chameleons. I have used it for chicken, pigeon and rabbit enclosures. It should be safe, it is 100% natural. Pick it up at HomeDepot or Lowes. It is not the best sealant, it does not compare to synthetic stuff. However, it is safe, it leaves minimal smell, and looks good on wood while offering decent protection.
 

Olimpia

Biologist & Ecologist
That's a great idea. Remember that for an adult panther or veiled you want to aim for a cage that is 4' tall x 2' x 2'. However, if you have the space for it I think doing 4' x 3' x 2' (or bigger) would be nicer, as I believe that chameleons really appreciate horizontal space when given a chance. And since you're building the cage, you can make it as big or wide as space and resources allow.
 
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