Aren't rescues the best pets? :)

Eeyore

New Member
Just about all of my pets are rescues. My 3 cats, 1 horse, 1 donkey, my 2 dogs are all rescues. Only ones that aren't rescues are my fish and chameleons.
 

PrettyInInk87

New Member
Just about all of my pets are rescues. My 3 cats, 1 horse, 1 donkey, my 2 dogs are all rescues. Only ones that aren't rescues are my fish and chameleons.
YES! Most of my pets are rescues or adopted too. Only ones that are not are my Chams and one of my tarantulas. :)
 

Eeyore

New Member
all of my guys came from pretty rough situations.

Walter- male cat, we got him at 4 weeks old, he'd been dumped at the side of the road
Maddie- female cat, came from a rescue, only surviving kitten, the mom had been beaten to death
Chewpie- female cat, born a stray

Lucky- mini horse, lived in a backyard and was beaten
Eeyore- donkey, came from bad divorce situation

Biddie- female pug, puppy mill puppy
Sully(aka dead eyed captan sullenburger) was the worst. we got him at 4 weeks old. he'd been surrendered at our vets office, his eye was prolapsed, he couldn't walk, had a collapsed tranchae, pnyoma, umbilical hernia, the little guy wasn't supposed to live the night. But he did! and he's two now!!
 

laurie

Retired Moderator
Eeyore you are wonderful to offer homes to all those rescues. I also have found somehow rescues just "show" up at my house and don't leave.:confused:
 

melric

Established Member
We use to rescue a dog and find it a good home at least 4 or 5 times a year. We haven't done that for a year or so.
 

ijmccollum

New Member
All of our dogs have been rescues with the exception of one - 20 years ago we did the papered sheltie. He was cute as heck but barked all the time and chased the kids on their bikes.

Also have 3 adpopted reptiles. Giant Day Gecko, Albino Fattail Gecko, Blue Tongue Skink. There have been others but they are no longer with us.
 

fluxlizard

Avid Member
Well, allow me to put a little rain on all this sunshine by pointing out rescues aren't for everybody.

Usually they come with some sort of problem- either medical or psychological and not everyone is equipped to deal with those problems.

Recent examples here on the forums- the melleri "rescues" that lasted no more than a couple of days before dying. Those were anything but "the best" pets. The owner was well intentioned in their "rescue" by purchasing them, and bless the owner for that intention, but that isn't enough to turn some rescues around.

Here's another- my sister got a rescued dog from a shelter. The dog was OK with adults, but freaked out when kids came around. Scared my first grader to death when we visited because the dog would snarl at him. Sister and hubby thought the dog just needed some love and training. It got plenty of both. All seemed well. Sister had first baby (real baby not animal baby). Dog and baby got along great until one day baby was a toddler. Sister, toddler and dog are all together in living room, all is peaceful. Toddler is lying on floor napping. Suddenly dog gets up and chomps on toddler's head, sinking teeth through skull. Toddler gets plenty of surgery for wound and to look normal again. Dog gets to go live with grandparents (it isn't dog's fault he's that way). This "rescue" was hardly the "best pet ever".

Here's another- I took in a huge 18lb iguana after it nearly removed an elderly woman's finger. She loved him like a baby even after the bite and surgery to save the finger, and even though she nearly lost most of the use of that finger even though it was still attached. Think that lizard made "the best pet?" I didn't- he was gorgeous and I gave him a good life, but I had to be on my toes every time I entered his walk-in enclosure.

Here are a couple dozen others- in the early 90s when the iguana craze was in full swing, people knew I liked lizards and I ended up having a lot of iguanas dumped on me over a few years time. Nearly all came with a lovely case of MBD and psychological problems resulting from ignoramuses neglecting them. You can't take an iguana and toss it in a cage and toss food and water in and expect it to be any better socially adjusted than a dog who you treated the same way. People didn't get that. These animals needed real help- corrections on diet and husbandry and socialization on a regular basis- sometimes including biting on their part and bleeding on my part. Most would not reach full size or look right, thanks to the mbd from their ignorant owners. These were far from "the best pets" as well. In less experienced hands, these may not have recovered or socialized.

If you are lucky you can find a "rescue" that is in good shape and does not come with problems of some sort. But many do- either physical or psychological. Most people are either too ignorant to know how to deal with these problems, or cannot afford to deal with these problems, or do not want to put in the effort to deal with these problems, or do not have a lifestyle that allows them to deal with these problems.

Bless everyone who is "right" for rescues and can truly provide them with a suitable situation. Because many rescues are far from "the best pets". Many well intentioned individuals without the knowledge or experience to provide these animals what they need would be better off trying to succeed with a healthy animal and seeing to it that it gets the best care and a permanent home so their pet never goes into a "rescue" situation in the first place- a way to deal with the same rescue problem from the other end of it by preventing it in the first place.
 
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Eeyore

New Member
Well, allow me to put a little rain on all this sunshine by pointing out rescues aren't for everybody.

Usually they come with some sort of problem- either medical or psychological and not everyone is equipped to deal with those problems.

Recent examples here on the forums- the melleri "rescues" that lasted no more than a couple of days before dying. Those were anything but "the best" pets. The owner was well intentioned in their "rescue" by purchasing them, and bless the owner for that intention, but that isn't enough to turn some rescues around.

Here's another- my sister got a rescued dog from a shelter. The dog was OK with adults, but freaked out when kids came around. Scared my first grader to death when we visited because the dog would snarl at him. Sister and hubby thought the dog just needed some love and training. It got plenty of both. All seemed well. Sister had first baby (real baby not animal baby). Dog and baby got along great until one day baby was a toddler. Sister, toddler and dog are all together in living room, all is peaceful. Toddler is lying on floor napping. Suddenly dog gets up and chomps on toddler's head, sinking teeth through skull. Toddler gets plenty of surgery for wound and to look normal again. Dog gets to go live with grandparents (it isn't dog's fault he's that way). This "rescue" was hardly the "best pet ever".

Here's another- I took in a huge 18lb iguana after it nearly removed an elderly woman's finger. She loved him like a baby even after the bite and surgery to save the finger, and even though she nearly lost most of the use of that finger even though it was still attached. Think that lizard made "the best pet?" I didn't- he was gorgeous and I gave him a good life, but I had to be on my toes every time I entered his walk-in enclosure.

Here are a couple dozen others- in the early 90s when the iguana craze was in full swing, people knew I liked lizards and I ended up having a lot of iguanas dumped on me over a few years time. Nearly all came with a lovely case of MBD and psychological problems resulting from ignoramuses neglecting them. You can't take an iguana and toss it in a cage and toss food and water in and expect it to be any better socially adjusted than a dog who you treated the same way. People didn't get that. These animals needed real help- corrections on diet and husbandry and socialization on a regular basis- sometimes including biting on their part and bleeding on my part. Most would not reach full size or look right, thanks to the mbd from their ignorant owners. These were far from "the best pets" as well. In less experienced hands, these may not have recovered or socialized.

If you are lucky you can find a "rescue" that is in good shape and does not come with problems of some sort. But many do- either physical or psychological. Most people are either too ignorant to know how to deal with these problems, or cannot afford to deal with these problems, or do not want to put in the effort to deal with these problems, or do not have a lifestyle that allows them to deal with these problems.

Bless everyone who is "right" for rescues and can truly provide them with a suitable situation. Because many rescues are far from "the best pets". Many well intentioned individuals without the knowledge or experience to provide these animals what they need would be better off trying to succeed with a healthy animal and seeing to it that it gets the best care and a permanent home so their pet never goes into a "rescue" situation in the first place- a way to deal with the same rescue problem from the other end of it by preventing it in the first place.

i agree with you-not all rescues are for everyone. And i understand. some people just don't have it, don't have the time. I most certainly have examples of trouble with rescues.

Sully, my shih tzu, is blind in one eye, has hip displasia, serious issues with being touched around the face, and permenant breathing issues.

eeyore, my donkey is lame for life; he came to us with a chunk of his hoof missing.

Lucky is extremly agressive because he was beaten in his old home.

biddie has genetic cataracts from bad breeding

all of my cats are wool suckers; a common side effect of being taken from their mother too early.

5 years ago, i took in a kitten sammy. 3 weeks old, realy sick. he did not live. i was crushed.

so yes i understand what you mean. But in my experience, rescues, if you put the time into them to help them with their issues, ca make the best pets.
 

PrettyInInk87

New Member
I've been lucky enought that all of my rescues and adopted pets have not come to me with major problems (except for my first Cham, passed 3 days later) and have been able to "nurse" them back to health. It is a MAJOR risk and responsibility to take on a rescue and I also agree with the above posts BUT putting all of that aside, they really can be great pets. :)
 

Miss Lily

Chameleon Enthusiast
My Tommy was a sort of a rescue. He wasn't in bad shape, just hadn't ever been misted properly and only had one live (half dead) Ficus in his viv and a makeshift dripper. He had been passed through several homes - back and forth between father and son a couple of times too. I am his fifth owner and I love him so much. Even after all he's been through he has never once hissed at me or tried to bite. He's never even gaped at me either. It just amazes me that he is such a beautiful, calm and trusting chameleon. He is such a joy to own, I just don't get how people before didn't want him. He has a happy forever home with me now - one thing's for sure, I will NEVER part with him. I love him far too much.
 

sagemoon2004

New Member
While I agree that not ALL rescues make great pets, many do, and if someone did not responsibly try to give them a good home, where does that animal go? All of our pets are rescues, I work with a local Spay-Neuter Animal Project group, so do a lot of fostering. As the manager of a pet supply, I am constantly getting animals from people who do not want them. I have learned to find other avenues for them, other rescue homes, so we are never over-loaded at our home. Good judgement has to be used at all times, especially with any aggression problems, but I haven't had a bad experience in 15 yrs+. Disappointment, yes, like my cham with a non-shooting tongue, but never a bad situation. I get very angry with pet owners because many times it IS the human that ruins the animal, or does not know how to be the pack leader, thus creating an aggression issue. We had a neighbor with a Mastif at our previous house, who was so sure her dog would never hurt anyone, though it started chasing us and I was forever looking over my shoulder. I was so happy to buy a house and move away. This dog was one scary weapon, and the owner had no control. Ended up attacking her sister and finally she put the dog down. This was owner stupidity, because in the beginning when she had a husband at home, we could pet this dog, even our 3yr old. Once no one was controlling him he became the Alpha, and there was no stopping him. I love every pet we own, and I will always stick with the rescues, but, again, good judgement has to prevail. We are supposed to be the caretakers...I believe that is my mission in life.
 
We have a rescue Greyhound, he is a funny dog and loves people, dislikes other dogs.

We have 2 rescue cats, 1 was a porch kitten and 1 came from a shelter.

One rescued Red Tail Boa, she was neglected for nearly a year before coming to me. She is a sweety for her situation, most constrictors that lived in a box with no contact except for the occasional feeding would be nasty.

One Crocodile Gecko, came to me with a broken jaw. He is meaner than most tokays are.

When you choose to take in a rescue, you are choosing to take in an animal with any # of health and social issues. You just need to be aware of any issues and ask as many questions as you can and not find yourself out of your depth.
 
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