Rainbow Jackson chameleon

Gtcrazy

New Member
My new juvenile jackson chameleon his name is kaiju is this a male? I’ve heard of rainbow Jackson with horns also being female any thoughts?
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Gtcrazy

New Member
Keeping up with my guess for female.

Are you also keeping live plants in her enclosure? Or just the artificial ones?
I believe she’s about 2 months to 3 and I have artificial plants I’m starting to lean over to the idea of real plants though. It’s kind of hard to hang pots in her enclosure since it’s very tall about 6 feet.
 

Sonny13

Chameleon Enthusiast
I believe she’s about 2 months to 3 and I have artificial plants I’m starting to lean over to the idea of real plants though. It’s kind of hard to hang pots in her enclosure since it’s very tall about 6 feet.
There´s no direct need for hanging, you can always place a large centrepiece plant with pot inside the enclosure. Trust me, it´s rewarding giving them some real plants and foliage to hide in. It also benefits in humidity and drinking (they the drops from the leaves).

Some excellent centrepieces are i.e. Schefflera´s or Ficus Alii and something from below list also check this for some inspiration https://www.chameleonforums.com/blogs/low-budget-enclosure-setup.2462/

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Gtcrazy

New Member
There´s no direct need for hanging, you can always place a large centrepiece plant with pot inside the enclosure. Trust me, it´s rewarding giving them some real plants and foliage to hide in. It also benefits in humidity and drinking (they the drops from the leaves).

Some excellent centrepieces are i.e. Schefflera´s or Ficus Alii and something from below list also check this for some inspiration https://www.chameleonforums.com/blogs/low-budget-enclosure-setup.2462/

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this is what I’m working with I could potentially hang one at the top and have one sitting at the bottom but would still need the artificial to fill in for the middle area what do u think…
 

Sonny13

Chameleon Enthusiast
For the easiest feedback, I would suggest filling out the following form, just copy/paste and complement it.

They´re some things needed to be corrected to give her the best possible life. Seeing her room one big question pops up directly. What are your nights temps in the room she is in? Because this would be the most important thing for now.

Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
Interesting cage set up. I see a few problems with it being that close to a window. Unfortunately glass doesn't let in enough UVB. Your chameleon isn't going to know that and is going to seek out the window light rather than your UVB lights and will be subject to metabolic bone disease. Regulating the temperature will also be an issue.

I will check back later to see what your answers are to the questions posted above.

Another note you will be able to hang pots from the sides of your cage to fill in if necessary. You will need a lot of plants to maintain a steady humidity.
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
Here are some links for now.
My Jackson's Supplement Schedule

 

Gtcrazy

New Member
For the easiest feedback, I would suggest filling out the following form, just copy/paste and complement it.

They´re some things needed to be corrected to give her the best possible life. Seeing her room one big question pops up directly. What are your nights temps in the room she is in? Because this would be the most important thing for now.

Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?
 

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JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
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Most urgent things first 90 F is far to hot for this species. 80-82 F is as high as I will go for mature males. You need to either move the bulb farther up and away from the cage or get a lower wattage. I use 40, 50 or 60 watts depending on age and ambient temperature factors. You don't need to add heat at night except to stay above 50 F at night in rare situations, probably not yours. They thrive on cooler nights 60 F is preferred.

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I can't get a good look at your lighting in your cage pictures but if you don't have a linear UVB bulb and fixture the length or width of the top of your cage you will need to upgrade quickly. The coil or short loop bulbs don't supply enough UVB. I know it sucks to hear you have to come up with even more supplies to do this right but it's the truth. All of your lighting needs to be mounted on or above the cage top. It's what works for these arboreal species.
Screen shot 2022-04-08 at 3.15.10 PM.png

After she settles in get a fecal sample to the vet treating for parasites before she gets sick makes for a more successful treatment.

Screen shot 2022-04-08 at 3.14.49 PM.png

Reptivite is a multivitamin it can be used once a month in this species. It is not my favorite brand. If you use it daily she will soon get sick from an over dose of vitamins. If you also have a plain phos. free calcium you can use that 2-3 times per week and use the multi monthly if you have the kind with D3. Your gut load will need more variety of other vegetables from the list that follows. You will not need the rice.
Suggested Ingredients

Best - These gutloading ingredients are best because they are highest in calcium, low in phosphorus, oxalates and goitrogens. They should be the primary components of your gutload: mustard greens, turnip greens, dandelion leaves, collard greens, escarole lettuce, papaya, watercress and alfalfa.


Good - These gutloading ingredients are good because they are moderately high in calcium and other vitamins/minerals. They should be used in addition to those from the previous category: sweet potato, carrots, oranges, mango, butternut squash, kale, apples, beet greens, blackberries, bok choy and green beans.

You may want to add a dripper to your midday somewhere to give her an extra opportunity to drink.
 

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Gtcrazy

New Member
View attachment 322703

Most urgent things first 90 F is far to hot for this species. 80-82 F is as high as I will go for mature males. You need to either move the bulb farther up and away from the cage or get a lower wattage. I use 40, 50 or 60 watts depending on age and ambient temperature factors. You don't need to add heat at night except to stay above 50 F at night in rare situations, probably not yours. They thrive on cooler nights 60 F is preferred.

View attachment 322704
I can't get a good look at your lighting in your cage pictures but if you don't have a linear UVB bulb and fixture the length or width of the top of your cage you will need to upgrade quickly. The coil or short loop bulbs don't supply enough UVB. I know it sucks to hear you have to come up with even more supplies to do this right but it's the truth. All of your lighting needs to be mounted on or above the cage top. It's what works for these arboreal species.
View attachment 322701
After she settles in get a fecal sample to the vet treating for parasites before she gets sick makes for a more successful treatment.

View attachment 322706
Reptivite is a multivitamin it can be used once a month in this species. It is not my favorite brand. If you use it daily she will soon get sick from an over dose of vitamins. If you also have a plain phos. free calcium you can use that 2-3 times per week and use the multi monthly if you have the kind with D3. Your gut load will need more variety of other vegetables from the list that follows. You will not need the rice.
Suggested Ingredients

Best - These gutloading ingredients are best because they are highest in calcium, low in phosphorus, oxalates and goitrogens. They should be the primary components of your gutload: mustard greens, turnip greens, dandelion leaves, collard greens, escarole lettuce, papaya, watercress and alfalfa.


Good - These gutloading ingredients are good because they are moderately high in calcium and other vitamins/minerals. They should be used in addition to those from the previous category: sweet potato, carrots, oranges, mango, butternut squash, kale, apples, beet greens, blackberries, bok choy and green beans.

You may want to add a dripper to your midday somewhere to give her an extra opportunity to drink.
 

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