Brookesia ID

Ekona

Established Member
I've had this Brookesia for about six months now and it seems to be doing fairly well. It came to me as B. stumpffi. However I'm sure that is not the correct ID.

I am leaning toward B. thieli due to white patterns on the nape, shape of the head and arrangement of spines along the sides and tail. I am also leaning toward female based on shape of the base of the tail. However I'm only going on photo comparisons from the internet.

I would appreciate a conclusive ID, if that is possible, from the attached photos.

Thanks!
 

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Hmmm. Well you're most definitely right that is isn't B. stumpffi! It looks a lot like moss or lichen, which is pretty cool. It could be B. thieli, but it doesn't look like a perfect match either imo. Sorry I don't have that definitive answer for you, but I thought I'd give me two cents. I'll dig around a little more and see if I come up with any other ideas
 
Thanks Syreptyon. It would be good to know with some certainty what species its is (and gender) thus asking here, b/c it is very cool and I'd sure like to get a mate for it - but want to make sure I'd be searching for the correct species.
 
Another possibility is B. ebanaui? My individual does have dorsolateral tubercles on the tail that decrease in size posterior to the sacral shield/pair and which appear to decrease in size on the body (anterior to posterior) anterior to the sacral pair
 
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This is a Brookesia ebenaui and appears to be a female. This is a very difficult species to build a group of and males are extremely difficult to find. There is an export quota of them, but they rarely (if ever) come in when they are ordered, and tend to only show up occasionally as a mislabeled individual, which the sellers in the US typically can't differentiate. When they do show up, they are almost always female with only a few males ever really coming in that I'm aware of. I've been trying to building my group for a few years now and I only have 0.2.2 with the two babies being hatched from a clutch from one of the females I have that she dropped when she came in.

Chris
 
This is a Brookesia ebenaui and appears to be a female. This is a very difficult species to build a group of and males are extremely difficult to find. There is an export quota of them, but they rarely (if ever) come in when they are ordered, and tend to only show up occasionally as a mislabeled individual, which the sellers in the US typically can't differentiate. When they do show up, they are almost always female with only a few males ever really coming in that I'm aware of. I've been trying to building my group for a few years now and I only have 0.2.2 with the two babies being hatched from a clutch from one of the females I have that she dropped when she came in.Chris

I did locate the ID key from Raxworthy & Nussbaum for Brookesia (http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.852.2808&rep=rep1&type=pdf) and from the photos I took, I thought it could be B. ebenaui. Thank you for the ID confirmation.
 
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