Behold!

Well, the red runners collapsed, it was simply too dry up here for a minimalist setup. I've corrected issues for future RR colonies, no several inches of moist substrate.(I've severely over estimated the red runners hardiness, and underestimated the harshness of the MN climate) That has been corrected.

On a happy note I decided to do a roach rescue from my local petsmart and bought all the roaches on display, sone which had been there for weeks with nothing but a small egg crate, and a white puffy cheeto looking thing that was bone dry.

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I'm sure this species can be easily guessed lol.

Anyways they are also now in an enclosure with several inches of moist substrate. Many also took a liking to the new food option moments after being released... Before even the substrate was added.

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Ironically as usual, the ivories are doing splendidly.
 
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Well, the red runners collapsed, it was simply too dry up here for a minimalist setup. I've corrected issues for future RR colonies, no several inches of moist substrate.(I've severely over estimated the red runners hardiness, and underestimated the harshness of the MN climate) That has been corrected.

Weird, I've had red runners survive with no water for 3 months... I set up tiny cups with soil/feeders for baby mantis to grow out, then moved them to bigger enclosures once they reached adulthood. Completely forgot about the cups; came back to find them bone dry, with the red runners and buffalo beetles doing fine, and everything else dead ☹️ Notably, ootheca won't hatch without humidity/moisture. I'm also pretty sure the adults survived by eating the ootheca after all the other food ran out...
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
Lobster roaches freak me out a little, but they make good feeders. They will actively attack other insects given the chance. They're also probably the hardiest roach you can keep, pretty hard to mess them up.
 
I don't think RRs are difficult either. I think like most roaches are hardy as long as you get enough things semi correct. Obviously the severe lack of humidity up here coupled with barely any substrate was enough to end all but the three largest ones. (Even with a water dish and fresh greens)

Granted I think if your in a more humid state id be willing to bet you could keep them differently I have no doubt in the more humid states red runners could thrive on the absolute bare minimum. But not all states climates are so tolerant.
 
I've gotten some roachy reinforcements from @jamest0o0 they've all arrived safe and sound.

The remaining red runners now have friends, and the ivories now have decent numbers around 70 or so.

The RRs
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The enclosure now has deeper moist substrate so I shouldn't lose any due to climate related difficulties.

The ivories
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There were a lot of small babies that I didn't feel comfortable handling for a photo shoot.

He even gave me an albino :p
(Not really)

Definitely order from him if you want some roaches.
 
Well I did another roach rescue from a different pet store, bringing my dubia colony up to 90 or so.

These dudes had been on display as is for over two months, from 2/17 to 3/25 (with an egg crate)
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Here's the rest, surprisingly few casualties considering the neglected state they endured.
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So my dubia colony now has a good genetic base of "Spartans" to build off if, and I did a good deed for 90 or so dubia that were doomed to a slow death.
 
The red runners seem to be doing well with the new setup.
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As proof the little baby ones are very active and healthy, and they are the most sensitive.
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These are the only ones I could photograph, the rest lived up to their name and bolted.
 
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