What species of spiders are healthy for your cham?

Presley_Veiled

New Member
So, I cought a wolf spider in my backyard and was thinking about feeding it to my little kiddo, but wasn't sure if it would hurt him or not. I just don't want him to tire of cricket's, and I can't afford anything else yet. (Besides the greens he loves) anyone know anything? because for some reason google is failing me.
(Also quick note just in case, because I'm a protective and paranoid papa, he is only 3 month's. I'm not sure if that changes anything, but thought I'd add it anyways)
 

Kiraral

Member
You should be very cautious of pesticides etc as well as parasites if you are going to feed insects you catch. For that reason, I purchase all my feeders; I’m not confident enough that the area around me is 100% safe for bug collecting. I’m also not sure how spider venom would effect a cham, and personally wouldn’t chance it. Actually, I’d be likely to keep the wolf spider, they’re cool.
 

Thehippie

Chameleon Enthusiast
while i dont think that it could be unsafe for chameleons to eat spiders. wolf spiders are venomous and i would be very wary of where that spider has been. for all you know that spider could have parasites or pesticides or could carry something harmful to your chameleon.
 

Presley_Veiled

New Member
Okey, well I joined this community because it was kind and helpful but this was not a fun morning. Sorry I even asked. When I said google failed me I ment I found nothing about the spider or what spiders my child could eat. So I had no way to know it was venomous. I have no Idea why I couldn't find the info but I couldn't. Some of you where kind with your cridazizum and I am gradful for that♡ Thanks anyway to everyone why responded though, I'll just mostlikly not post again soon.
 

pmdaggett79

Member
Okey, well I joined this community because it was kind and helpful but this was not a fun morning. Sorry I even asked. When I said google failed me I ment I found nothing about the spider or what spiders my child could eat. So I had no way to know it was venomous. I have no Idea why I couldn't find the info but I couldn't. Some of you where kind with your cridazizum and I am gradful for that♡ Thanks anyway to everyone why responded though, I'll just mostlikly not post again soon.
No worries friend. We are all here to help. All jokes aside, you did the right thing by asking before doing. In my honest opinion, I wouldn’t feed my guy any spiders, especially wild caught. A few years ago I had a spider make its way into the enclosure and my female was just as spooked about it as I was. I don’t like them, so why give one to my pet? Wolf spiders are a bad idea for a few reasons. They are venomous, the live in grass and make their homes in dirt so they my have dangerous pesticides or bacteria parasites. Basically anything that you catch on the ground is probably a bad idea. Also remember that chameleons are very delicate animals so always use caution with wild caught insects.

I do catch cicada bugs throughout the warmer months here in Texas and feed them regularly to my bearded dragon. Before I feed though I inspect every one and clip their wings,(very indigestible) and give them a bath. Those are my beardies favorite treat. When my chameleon becomes full adult I’ll give him one and keep a close eye on how he digests it.

Always view things on the side of caution before doing anything out of the ordinary. It’s better safe than sorry. Good job asking and please let that spider go so he can eat bad bugs
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Okey, well I joined this community because it was kind and helpful but this was not a fun morning. Sorry I even asked. When I said google failed me I ment I found nothing about the spider or what spiders my child could eat. So I had no way to know it was venomous. I have no Idea why I couldn't find the info but I couldn't. Some of you where kind with your cridazizum and I am gradful for that♡ Thanks anyway to everyone why responded though, I'll just mostlikly not post again soon.
Hey there :) I found this solution to combat expense of feeders. You can order online and they mail them to you. The prices are sooooooo much better then a local pet store. You can add variation like Dubia and Phoenix worms (Black soldier fly larvae) too. They sell based on size and quantity and you can set up a recurring subscription :) I have been editing my subscription as my guy gets bigger to accommodate larger feeders. Hope this helps :)http://www.rainbowmealworms.net/
 

Presley_Veiled

New Member
No worries friend. We are all here to help. All jokes aside, you did the right thing by asking before doing. In my honest opinion, I wouldn’t feed my guy any spiders, especially wild caught. A few years ago I had a spider make its way into the enclosure and my female was just as spooked about it as I was. I don’t like them, so why give one to my pet? Wolf spiders are a bad idea for a few reasons. They are venomous, the live in grass and make their homes in dirt so they my have dangerous pesticides or bacteria parasites. Basically anything that you catch on the ground is probably a bad idea. Also remember that chameleons are very delicate animals so always use caution with wild caught insects.

I do catch cicada bugs throughout the warmer months here in Texas and feed them regularly to my bearded dragon. Before I feed though I inspect every one and clip their wings,(very indigestible) and give them a bath. Those are my beardies favorite treat. When my chameleon becomes full adult I’ll give him one and keep a close eye on how he digests it.

Always view things on the side of caution before doing anything out of the ordinary. It’s better safe than sorry. Good job asking and please let that spider go so he can eat bad bugs
Thank you, I have let the spider go lol and I've purchased a few more cricket's and got some lil wormies for him. Sorry to all if I seemed like I overreacted. I was stressed and tired when I reseved these comments. I appologiz to my fellow reptile lovers, and thank you all for the support.
 

Presley_Veiled

New Member
Hey there :) I found this solution to combat expense of feeders. You can order online and they mail them to you. The prices are sooooooo much better then a local pet store. You can add variation like Dubia and Phoenix worms (Black soldier fly larvae) too. They sell based on size and quantity and you can set up a recurring subscription :) I have been editing my subscription as my guy gets bigger to accommodate larger feeders. Hope this helps :)http://www.rainbowmealworms.net/
Thank you! I checked it out and might try it out too lol☆
 

Bigsky

Established Member
All spiders feed by injecting enzymes into their prey. Then they swallow the resulting fluid.
I have fed large orb weaving spiders to quads, and had no problems.
I know of no instances oif spiders carrying parasites that have reptiles as intermediate hosts.
Its highly unlikely that your spider was contaminated with insecticide, or it would be dead.
I have a light trap that captures moths and other night-flying insects. This is a major source of cham food during the summer.
I see a lot of comments about field chemicals. What is the source of this information?
 

Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
All spiders feed by injecting enzymes into their prey. Then they swallow the resulting fluid.
I have fed large orb weaving spiders to quads, and had no problems.
I know of no instances oif spiders carrying parasites that have reptiles as intermediate hosts.
Its highly unlikely that your spider was contaminated with insecticide, or it would be dead.
I have a light trap that captures moths and other night-flying insects. This is a major source of cham food during the summer.
I see a lot of comments about field chemicals. What is the source of this information?
I think it’s more of a “better safe than sorry” line of thinking...
 

iMi

Established Member
All has been said already. Parasites, venom, pesticides. All come to play. We all learn as we go. Good luck!
 

Kiraral

Member
I see a lot of comments about field chemicals. What is the source of this information?

I’m regards to my own caution, it is the element of the unknown. I simply would rather not take the risk; I have neighbors near by, I don’t know what they do or do not treat with. There are a wide variety of substances out there, I’m sure there are things that would not be good for a cham that may not kill a bug instantly. I have no source other than I don’t know everything, lol. Personally, I’d rather spend a few dollars and buy feeders than risk missing something, but that’s just my choice.
 

iMi

Established Member
All spiders feed by injecting enzymes into their prey. Then they swallow the resulting fluid.
I have fed large orb weaving spiders to quads, and had no problems.
I know of no instances oif spiders carrying parasites that have reptiles as intermediate hosts.
Its highly unlikely that your spider was contaminated with insecticide, or it would be dead.
I have a light trap that captures moths and other night-flying insects. This is a major source of cham food during the summer.
I see a lot of comments about field chemicals. What is the source of this information?

If you do proper research and feel comfortable using wild cought bugs, go for it. There are some that are toxic, such as the lightning bug common to where I live. On the other hand, I live next to a relatively large natural preserve. In the summer, the bike path going through it is full of grasshoppers, praying mantis and other bugs. I doubt they have come in contact with chemicals. I would worry more about parasites, but you make a good point. What parasites are out there and what are their life stages? Do they involve reptiles as an intermediary host? All good questions.
 

Bigsky

Established Member
If you do proper research and feel comfortable using wild cought bugs, go for it. There are some that are toxic, such as the lightning bug common to where I live. On the other hand, I live next to a relatively large natural preserve. In the summer, the bike path going through it is full of grasshoppers, praying mantis and other bugs. I doubt they have come in contact with chemicals. I would worry more about parasites, but you make a good point. What parasites are out there and what are their life stages? Do they involve reptiles as an intermediary host? All good questions.
If you do proper research and feel comfortable using wild cought bugs, go for it. There are some that are toxic, such as the lightning bug common to where I live. On the other hand, I live next to a relatively large natural preserve. In the summer, the bike path going through it is full of grasshoppers, praying mantis and other bugs. I doubt they have come in contact with chemicals. I would worry more about parasites, but you make a good point. What parasites are out there and what are their life stages? Do they involve reptiles as an intermediary host? All good questions.
There may be obligatory insect/chameleon hosts of parasites in the tropics. There are none in temperate zones that I am aware of.
 
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