Uvb exposure

Ramrod

Avid Member
Dont know if anyone can give an answer without having same setup to check but here goes.
I have not invested in a uvb meter yet and wondering what the proper distance to branch would be using a 48" quad fixture with single reflector and 3 6500 bulbs and 1 arcadia t5 12% in the outer position. I know its tuff without a meter but anyone venture to make an educated guess?
 

Ramrod

Avid Member
Dont know if anyone can give an answer without having same setup to check but here goes.
I have not invested in a uvb meter yet and wondering what the proper distance to branch would be using a 48" quad fixture with single reflector and 3 6500 bulbs and 1 arcadia t5 12% in the outer position. I know its tuff without a meter but anyone venture to make an educated guess?
Wow not even a wrong answer. Maybe things are looking up😄
 

Pi11ow

Member
Their website has a pretty good set of benchmarks. You can select species and get their recommendations and it says a screen will diffuse it by about 30% I believe.
 

Ramrod

Avid Member
Their website has a pretty good set of benchmarks. You can select species and get their recommendations and it says a screen will diffuse it by about 30% I believe.
Great info and thanks for the reply. Guess these figures are for using a single bulb with a single reflector. Doesn't really say.
 

Pi11ow

Member
Yeah, I would assume so. Might scour the build posts and try to find someone that’s using the quad setup and slide into their DMs haha
 

Dbash44

Avid Member
Dont know if anyone can give an answer without having same setup to check but here goes.
I have not invested in a uvb meter yet and wondering what the proper distance to branch would be using a 48" quad fixture with single reflector and 3 6500 bulbs and 1 arcadia t5 12% in the outer position. I know its tuff without a meter but anyone venture to make an educated guess?
So I can kind of help you here.

I use a 24 inch quad fixture with three 6500k bulbs. Other bulb is Arcadia 12% in one of the inside sockets (third in or second in depending how you look at it). I have the fixture suspended about 6-8 inches above the enclosures and the UV basking spot is about 6 inches down in the enclosure. I get a reading on my solar meter of just above 3 that way. I could get more exact measurements for you later. This is just what I'm guessing based off memory. Don't know how different it will be with a 48 inch fixture. Also depends on what fixture you're using and the type of reflectors it has and how many. I use the Hydrofarm Agrobrite: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002JQBQZQ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

@cyberlocc and @nightanole are pretty knowledgeable with this stuff.
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
The math for a quad with a mono reflector

40% light reduction on the outer tubes
60% reduction on inner two tubes

So if it was a 50% reduction, it would turn a 12% into a 6%.
 

Pi11ow

Member
That seems like a lot of waste. Is that uvb reduction or light? Seems like daisy chaining single bulb fixtures would be the more efficient route.
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
That seems like a lot of waste. Is that uvb reduction or light? Seems like daisy chaining single bulb fixtures would be the more efficient route.
That is why the more expensive quads have individual reflectors. It is "light" reduction, but thats the same as UVB reduction. Think about it, on the inner bulbs less than half the bulb can get out of the fixture, and it cant reflect off of anything.
 

Pi11ow

Member
Gotcha. Makes sense. In my head I am using single bulb as the baseline. But in actuality you are saying of the 100% of the light produced from the bulb in a mono quad only 40% of the inner bulbs light is directed down? And if that is the case, what is the reduction for a single bulb fixture?
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
Gotcha. Makes sense. In my head I am using single bulb as the baseline. But in actuality you are saying of the 100% of the light produced from the bulb in a mono quad only 40% of the inner bulbs light is directed down? And if that is the case, what is the reduction for a single bulb fixture?
Baseline 100% is a single bulb fixture with a reflector.


So yes, less than half of the light of a inner bulb is usable.


With a dual with mono, i believe the reduction is only 20%. That means that you get 60% more light if you switch from a single, to a double with mono reflector. Instead of 100% increase if you had single reflectors.

With a quad and a mono, you only double(100% more light) your light out put vs a single.


Yep mono reflectors are pretty wasteful. Just like the old school shop overhead florescents with "white" reflectors
 

Pi11ow

Member
Cool, great info. I always lean toward individual components when it comes to electronics anyway. Learnt my lesson back when I had one of those dvd/vcr/tv combos as a kid. Haha
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
Cool, great info. I always lean toward individual components when it comes to electronics anyway. Learnt my lesson back when I had one of those dvd/vcr/tv combos as a kid. Haha
Yea i used to work at a tv shop for 10 years. 20 bucks and ill disable your dvd or vcr so the tv still works :)
 

jcarlsen

Avid Member
It sounds like I actually have the same fixture as you and am in the middle of re-setting up my dragonstrand 4ft tall enclosure for a new panther in the late spring early summer. Here's some shots of my basking/UV branch with measurements and UV meter readings.
IMG_6812.jpeg
IMG_6813.jpeg
IMG_6814.jpeg
 

Dbash44

Avid Member
@Ramrod @Pi11ow @nightanole

Hey guys. I got some pictures and measurements for you. I was originally off by a few inches with my guestimation.

Don’t know if I mentioned this before, but the fixture I use has individual reflectors for each bulb. Got the suggestion from nightanole while stalking some old threads haha

So in the uvb basking area I am sure to include multiple levels of branches so that my panther can seek the uvb fix he’s looking for. You’ll notice how quickly the uvi drops from 3.4 to 2 in pictures six and seven. Same area just a few inches difference from where I was taking the readings. Also, the uvi is always higher at the center of the bulb in case anyone is wondering. So set up your branches accordingly. I get about 2 uvi at the ends of the bulb.

At any rate, I make sure I hit 3 uvi and give a little extra just in case. I notice my panther likes the higher uvi areas.
 

Attachments

Ramrod

Avid Member
So I can kind of help you here.

I use a 24 inch quad fixture with three 6500k bulbs. Other bulb is Arcadia 12% in one of the inside sockets (third in or second in depending how you look at it). I have the fixture suspended about 6-8 inches above the enclosures and the UV basking spot is about 6 inches down in the enclosure. I get a reading on my solar meter of just above 3 that way. I could get more exact measurements for you later. This is just what I'm guessing based off memory. Don't know how different it will be with a 48 inch fixture. Also depends on what fixture you're using and the type of reflectors it has and how many. I use the Hydrofarm Agrobrite: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002JQBQZQ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

@cyberlocc and @nightanole are pretty knowledgeable with this stuff.
I would assume these readings are with a conventional screen cage. My enclosure is made with 1/4" wire and think that would result in slightly less loss than others. Thanks for info
 

Dbash44

Avid Member
I would assume these readings are with a conventional screen cage. My enclosure is made with 1/4" wire and think that would result in slightly less loss than others. Thanks for info
You talking about chicken wire?

I highly suggest getting a solar meter if you can. They just under $200 on amazon. It’s a heavy hit to your wallet, but I promise it will pay for itself.

You’ll have solace knowing things are as perfect as possible. You won’t have to worry about over exposing your cham to uvb which can damage cells. Plus you’ll really get an idea of when to change your bulbs which might be less often which saves you money in the long run. My idea has been to buy a 12% bulb and lower it closer to the enclosure as it starts to be less effective. I would usually change bulbs at 4 months which I don’t have to do now. I also highly suggest a solar meter if you’re using something that’s less common for people to use. That way you know you’re doing it right and don’t have to guess.
 

Ramrod

Avid Member
You talking about chicken wire?

I highly suggest getting a solar meter if you can. They just under $200 on amazon. It’s a heavy hit to your wallet, but I promise it will pay for itself.

You’ll have solace knowing things are as perfect as possible. You won’t have to worry about over exposing your cham to uvb which can damage cells. Plus you’ll really get an idea of when to change your bulbs which might be less often which saves you money in the long run. My idea has been to buy a 12% bulb and lower it closer to the enclosure as it starts to be less effective. I would usually change bulbs at 4 months which I don’t have to do now. I also highly suggest a solar meter if you’re using something that’s less common for people to use. That way you know you’re doing it right and don’t have to guess.
No its not chicken wire. It's 1/4" steel hardware cloth. Actually a wire mesh with 1/4" square openings. I am planning on a solarmeter but just haven't got one as yet. I build my own enclosures and that's the material I use so it is a little different than the usual screen cage. I have the same idea as far as adjusting the height of fixture so a meter is in the immediate future.
 
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