Panther shedding bath

Just curious, I've seen pictures of people giving their Panther chameleons baths during sheds. I have a very young 8 week old Panther so don't want to do it at all currently honestly until he doubles in size. Is giving them a bath just to help with the shed and something that is necessary? Never had to assist my veiled with any shedding. New to Panther species so thought I'd ask.
 

frankpayne32

Avid Member
There's no reason to give your chameleon a bath, ever. Just keep the humidity high by misting the enclosure and he should shed fine if in good health. :)
 
Sweet, thanks! Yea I already keep his humidity between 50-70% never let it go below 40% and it'll reach 80% directly after mistings. I must 3 times daily to keep it at those levels. He unfortunately hates the mistings and runs for his life when I start to mist. I think he's starting to dislike me because of it:(
 

Zobert

New Member
There's no reason to give your chameleon a bath, ever. Just keep the humidity high by misting the enclosure and he should shed fine if in good health. :)
They like playing in water, though. At least mine did. Put him near a faucet or spray hose and it was like watching a little kid play.

I read this stuff and wondered how mine lived to 6 years with everything I did wrong with him.
 
Well I don't see him playing in water to be anything you did "wrong". Ever chameleon has a different personality. Personally mine seems to hate water based on his reactions to the mistings.
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
They like playing in water, though. At least mine did. Put him near a faucet or spray hose and it was like watching a little kid play.

I read this stuff and wondered how mine lived to 6 years with everything I did wrong with him.
There is a huge difference between "playing" in the splash from a water source and dunking a chameleon into a tub of water. There's really no reason to give a cham a bath in order to help it shed.
 

frankpayne32

Avid Member
They like playing in water, though. At least mine did. Put him near a faucet or spray hose and it was like watching a little kid play.

I read this stuff and wondered how mine lived to 6 years with everything I did wrong with him.
Well I don't see him playing in water to be anything you did "wrong". Ever chameleon has a different personality. Personally mine seems to hate water based on his reactions to the mistings.
Chameleons aren't kids, they don't like "playing" in water. Please don't anyone try to recreate this. This is just a good example of how tough chameleons really are when basic needs are met even when subjected to stressful situations. I'm sorry if that's harsh, but it's important that people don't think that it's an acceptable method of husbandry.

Here's a tip for misting. A lot of chameleons don't like getting sprayed with water directly and abruptly. I don't like the cheap small spray bottles. Get a hand held pressurized mister like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Chapin-20000-1-Gallon-Garden-Sprayer/dp/B000E28UQU/ref=pd_sim_lg_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=0MV0Z1A3QTSC04VJ3VZF

It's still cheap and produces a fine mist.

The key is to start with a fine mist on a nearby plant or surface without directly hitting the chameleon. Slowly move the mist towards the chameleon allowing some water to indirectly land on it. After a few seconds of this the chameleon will usually recognize it is "raining" and usually start to drink and clean it's eyes. Just remember to go slow and gentle with the mist.
 

Zobert

New Member
Chameleons aren't kids, they don't like "playing" in water. Please don't anyone try to recreate this. This is just a good example of how tough chameleons really are when basic needs are met even when subjected to stressful situations. I'm sorry if that's harsh, but it's important that people don't think that it's an acceptable method of husbandry.

Here's a tip for misting. A lot of chameleons don't like getting sprayed with water directly and abruptly. I don't like the cheap small spray bottles. Get a hand held pressurized mister like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Chapin-20000-1-Gallon-Garden-Sprayer/dp/B000E28UQU/ref=pd_sim_lg_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=0MV0Z1A3QTSC04VJ3VZF

It's still cheap and produces a fine mist.

The key is to start with a fine mist on a nearby plant or surface without directly hitting the chameleon. Slowly move the mist towards the chameleon allowing some water to indirectly land on it. After a few seconds of this the chameleon will usually recognize it is "raining" and usually start to drink and clean it's eyes. Just remember to go slow and gentle with the mist.
Okay understood but can you explain why it is he would always just crawl over to the sink when I was doing dishes and "act" like he was playing in it by sticking his hands in it. This happened more than once. I just assumed it was pleasurable for him in some way. I never put him in water. He found his way over.

I call it "playing" because I don't have the chameleon word for it.
 

kiwii

New Member
Chameleons aren't kids, they don't like "playing" in water. Please don't anyone try to recreate this. This is just a good example of how tough chameleons really are when basic needs are met even when subjected to stressful situations. I'm sorry if that's harsh, but it's important that people don't think that it's an acceptable method of husbandry.

Here's a tip for misting. A lot of chameleons don't like getting sprayed with water directly and abruptly. I don't like the cheap small spray bottles. Get a hand held pressurized mister like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Chapin-20000-1-Gallon-Garden-Sprayer/dp/B000E28UQU/ref=pd_sim_lg_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=0MV0Z1A3QTSC04VJ3VZF

It's still cheap and produces a fine mist.

The key is to start with a fine mist on a nearby plant or surface without directly hitting the chameleon. Slowly move the mist towards the chameleon allowing some water to indirectly land on it. After a few seconds of this the chameleon will usually recognize it is "raining" and usually start to drink and clean it's eyes. Just remember to go slow and gentle with the mist.
Frank,
How do you know that the material that sprayer is made from is safe? After all it's designed to spray pesticides on plants not to provide potable water for drinking.
Thanks,
Nick
 
I was just asking, never have given any of my chameleons a bath. Like I said was just curious and glad I asked. Didn't think there was a reason but these animals are so complex I wouldn't have been surprised. Also, I use a pressurized misting bottle I purches at a local reptile store. I use warmish water so it's not freezing cold, lowering the temp or the cage and him. Like you said, I usually do start by misting the vines and leaves but even when the very fine mist starts to touch him, he runs for cover. Going to the top of the cage, hanging upside down and walking around. Trying to avoid the mist. Strange in my opinion. I completely avoid directly spraying him due to his.
Also, while some people have very friendly chameleons I don't plan on letting mine just roam freely around my house, especially near a sink or anything like that. I will always be holding him or him be in a house plant with me watching closely. Never just "chillen" in my house. Dangerous in my opinion. So many areas these fragile guys could get injured in it seems. My house isn't chameleon proof lol. I also have a very large (5'x2.5'x6') handl built cage for my veiled and plan on doing the same for the Panther so no need for them to ever be out honestly. It's their sanctuary:)
 
Chameleons aren't kids, they don't like "playing" in water. Please don't anyone try to recreate this. This is just a good example of how tough chameleons really are when basic needs are met even when subjected to stressful situations. I'm sorry if that's harsh, but it's important that people don't think that it's an acceptable method of husbandry.
Also not to be harsh back but I don't believe anyone here thought "playing" with a chameleon was correct husbandry. If someone honestly tried to force their chameleon to "play" with water; quite frankly theyre dumb. What you said isn't harsh but the statement of "this is just a good example of how tough chameleons really are when basic needs are met..." Doesn't make sense to me.
 

ahood

Member
I thought my Panther hated water too because he always runs when I mist lol but the other day when he was shedding I found that he had made his way to the bottom of his cage and was soaking in the pan that catches water from the Big Dripper. I was shocked as I didn't think chameleons did that.
 

Zobert

New Member
Also not to be harsh back but I don't believe anyone here thought "playing" with a chameleon was correct husbandry. If someone honestly tried to force their chameleon to "play" with water; quite frankly theyre dumb. What you said isn't harsh but the statement of "this is just a good example of how tough chameleons really are when basic needs are met..." Doesn't make sense to me.
I actually did think his statement was harsh. I used a word "playing" to describe what it looked like. Obviously it's a reptile with a reptilian brain so it didn't go "Weeeeee, weeeeeee" as it splashed around and played Marco Polo in the sink.

I had to think about how I wanted to proceed saying what I'm saying right now and that is this: I used a particular word because there is no other word. You use the language you have to create visual imagery.

He would crawl to the sink and put his hands in water. Why?

He wasn't drinking the water.

He wasn't rubbing it on himself.

He only did it when the water was running.

He "enjoyed" some aspect of it, and before I hear what a reptile's brain can or cannot do and receive some lecture anyone feels appropriate please understand that to get a Master's in Environmental Sciences I had to dual minor in biology and geology, so I do understand a reptilian brain and wasn't "herp-derping".

"Enjoy" is a human word for how we "feel" about stimuli, but all living things have some sense of enjoyment although not in the same way.
 
Lol I wish my chameleon could play Marco Polo.'/ I think if your little guy loves "playing" in that water. That's fantastic! I'm not the one saying you shouldn't allow it. I wish my chameleons would even enjoy me touching them but one is also a baby so I understand. The other is just a grumpy veiled...
 

Zobert

New Member
Lol I wish my chameleon could play Marco Polo.'/ I think if your little guy loves "playing" in that water. That's fantastic! I'm not the one saying you shouldn't allow it. I wish my chameleons would even enjoy me touching them but one is also a baby so I understand. The other is just a grumpy veiled...
Willie was an odd chameleon. He preferred to be with the walking tree (me) than on his cage or other planted trees. I guess I had a better view of the room or something.
 
So jealous. My veiled runs for his life with any sight of me and so far my Panther is the same because I beilive he sees me as the "misting monster". :(
 
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