New Humidifier to test the "Naturalistic Approach"

cyberlocc

Avid Member
I only have montaines so I wouldn't have a clue if this is good or bad for other species. It's too early to even know if it will work out long term. I not sure if I will continue it thru the rest of the year. I mainly tried it because my air conditioner was dropping my ambient humidity so low at night and to see if I could get a better night time temperature drop without adding more AC. My cage thermometers are reading a 2˚ drop below my thermostat. That might be because they just aren't that accurate. My screen cages are covered so only the front and top are screen.
I do find it interesting that when I test my ultrasonic humidifier after refilling and cleaning it, the only time I run it during the day, my avatar will move into the stream by the nozzle. Normally he hates any kind of breeze. I don't know if he's attracted to the motion of the fog or likes the sensation. The adult females do so but to a lesser extent. Just an observation that tells me it can't be too unpleasant for them.
Like any other aspect of husbandry you want to avoid an over growth of bacteria. The immune system deals with bacteria all day long in moderate amounts. Clearly you don't want to be forcing them into the respiratory system out of a filthy pool of water. I use PVC and don't glue the joints to it can be cleaned easier and run my ultrasonic humidifiers until almost empty and wipe them dry and then let them air dry. I dislike the hose that I see on the reptifogger because it is corrugated and water is only going to pool in the grooves.
That is part of my issue.

The ability to clean it throughly and ever day, (the link from the scientists say everyday is best, every 3 is minimum) and clean the pipes, makes it easier.

How for me, personally getting to those pipes, is not an easy feat. PVC glued or not, my tubing will be behind the cage, which will weigh a good 250lbs. As it's solid wood, and as tall as my ceiling. In that case, it's not long as easy. Especially being it's a bioactive enclosure.

That said, I have thought of adding wheels to it, and I will likely do that. Because otherwise it will just be too much

That said, both my fogger and Water supply are RV stoarge tanks. Designed to hold drinking water. I may add UV sterilizers and the fogger is a very closed system, with the fan having a good filter, and all water being RODI.
 
Last edited:

Goose502

Chameleon Enthusiast
I would think a swamp cooler would be blowing air that’s too cold. Drastic temp swings(like standing in a cool breeze) could weaken a chameleon. I really think just a heavy misting before lights out is sufficient and safe. It lowers the overall temp slightly, and without any lights, will delay any evaporation. I see a constant nebulizer as either an irritant, or just a very insufficient way to maintain humidity at night. Now using a screen cage in a room where the overall humidity is raised would seem safer, but high humidity wrecks the interior of a home.
 

cyberlocc

Avid Member
I would think a swamp cooler would be blowing air that’s too cold. Drastic temp swings(like standing in a cool breeze) could weaken a chameleon. I really think just a heavy misting before lights out is sufficient and safe. It lowers the overall temp slightly, and without any lights, will delay any evaporation. I see a constant nebulizer as either an irritant, or just a very insufficient way to maintain humidity at night. Now using a screen cage in a room where the overall humidity is raised would seem safer, but high humidity wrecks the interior of a home.
Not nesscarily.

A swamp cooler for a house, yes way too strong way too cold, 110% agree.


But that's why I said, a swamp made for the cage. If you used a low speed computer fan, then the breeze would not be as strong. Swamps really can't cool much more than 10-15 degrees, which is also the suggested night drop.

Then, ideally anyway you would want to mount the fan at the top of the cage, and chams usually sleep lowerish. So there would a decent space between them and the fan.

You also don't need to nesscarily point the fan directly in, it could just skim the top, and the cool and humidity should be pulled in.

You could also blast it into a 3 sided box, that should take some bite off the wind, as it disperses more before going down.

Also like I said, having a wet cage over night isn't safe. It will breed bacteria, wet surfaces can cause RIs, and your plants will get root rot, Crown Root, and fungus issues.

No option is perfect. They all have pros and cons, and things that change with them.
 

Remkon

Chameleon Enthusiast
No option is perfect. They all have pros and cons, and things that change with them.
Truest statement ever!

I'd also like to think a strong and healthy cham is able to take quite a punch and will not get sick that easily 90% of the time...

There's many ways to do husbandry right and have a healthy happy chameleon, there are even more ways to do it wrong.
Just make sure you avoid doing it wrong.
 

Decadancin

Moderatoris Americanus
Staff member
Truest statement ever!

I'd also like to think a strong and healthy cham is able to take quite a punch and will not get sick that easily 90% of the time...

There's many ways to do husbandry right and have a healthy happy chameleon, there are even more ways to do it wrong.
Just make sure you avoid doing it wrong.
This is exactly how we should think most of the time. (This does not mean I am agreeing with @Remkon , so don't worry folks :p) If an animal is healthy it can handle a lot. Our goal should be to minimize the stress that our husbandry can cause. The link in post 45 of this thread was one of the final posts in a looong discussion about drainage and at times was a bit argumentative, but it showed many keepers (some of whom I learned tons from over the years) who had very different approaches to watering needs. I read the entire thread over and I still enjoy it, but the one thing that stands out more than anything is we can always learn more, and we can even be wrong once in a while ( @Remkon more than most of us...) I think I mentioned a few times the reasoning behind short misting sessions for my veiled was due to the idea that their native range is quite arid at times, and they must be supplementing their diets with greens from vegetation. Urates were totally bright white so it must have been O.K. Well, from what I have learned, they do not actually get much moisture from the vegetation as much of it is dried during the periods with little to no rain. Jury is still out on why they consume vegetation. So if this isn't the reason (or benefit) then how are they getting hydrated? Must be through their prey and their environment. That is why it makes even more sense to me to have higher humidity levels at night.
 

dshuld

Chameleon Enthusiast
I will agree that this may not be for everyone. People with glass enclosures may not need it all or only need short bursts for a quick boost here and there. I think one thing that needs to be watched is how your house "runs". I've tracked how my house has reacted to various things I've done and am using the fog/ humidifier to help counter act what I see going on at night vs day. At night my house drops on average 8 to 10% in the main house and 10 to 14% in the bedrooms. Cham cages still maintain a few points higher naturally but are no where near what the panthers would see in nature. Most of them were setup before coming across Petr's article / Bill's podcast on this and are setup for the traditional night time dry out. Lola's cage was done with this incorporated but remains in the acceptable natural range for her so she only gets short "boosts" during the night from 1 am to 5 am. Obviously as I keep going on this project her times will have to be adjusted accordingly but for now she gets 20 minutes an hour during that time frame.
 
Last edited:

Goose502

Chameleon Enthusiast
A long while back I kind of said the same thing. It was some post regarding misting, and someone said not to mist at night. My thoughts were why not? It rains at night in nature, and as long as my temp drop wasn’t below what was recommended, I don’t see the harm in it. My misting is set up both on a timer, and also linked to overall humidity. Now I doubt it does, but if the humidity were to drop below my night time setting, they would turn on. If they were to run in the middle of the night, wouldn’t bother me or the chameleon. So many theories and practices on hydration. Also, many variables to best practice. I am very excited to see this topic pop up and hear so many opinions.
 

Decadancin

Moderatoris Americanus
Staff member
So as a follow up to my "experiment" with fogging, I have found that there is absolutely no direct relationship between raising humidity levels and lowering temps in the enclosure :(. The low temps that are listed on my thermometer are constant through the night, and the best cool down is actually right after the first misting of the morning 1 hour after lights come on. I was hoping to get more of a drop in temps at night, but it would seem that the slight raise in humidity prior to using the fogger was a result of the temps going down after lights out, and the temp did not go down due to humidity levels. I'm still happy with the performance of the humidifier and I am planning on continuing its use, but was expecting a different result.
 

M I K E Y

Member
Love this humidifier bought the same one last year, works wonders for me in the winter when the house dries out, love the split nozzle so I can hit two cages at once.:D
 

Decadancin

Moderatoris Americanus
Staff member
I wanted to change out my tubing to something better like you used. What is the flexible tube you used from the pvc connection to the cage connection? I am guessing this is something that I could pick up at a hardware store? :) Thank you!
I got the braided tubing at Lowes. I wanted something that would be less likely to collapse and prevent the mist from flowing. It is in the plumbing department.
 

Ekona

Established Member
It actually came with the unit. I used a 1" tube that it is attached to to route it to the top of the enclosure.

View attachment 212689
Do you have a link to this model? Also is it top fill, or do you have to disconnect the hose and then remove and refill the reservoir from the bottom?
I currently use a top fill model which is great because I don't have to disassemble the unit to refill.
 

Decadancin

Moderatoris Americanus
Staff member
Do you have a link to this model? Also is it top fill, or do you have to disconnect the hose and then remove and refill the reservoir from the bottom?
I currently use a top fill model which is great because I don't have to disassemble the unit to refill.
Search for Taotronics dual 360 humidifier. You pull out the hose and fill it from the bottom of the reservoir, but you will want to wipe out the base to keep it from getting slimy anyway, so it is no big deal.
 

Decadancin

Moderatoris Americanus
Staff member
So, many months of fogging at night have led to the following results...

No mold or mildew build up. No respiratory issues. Occasionally clean out the base unit while filling the reservoir. No signs of dehydration.

I have cut back on misting during the day, but the plants have not done well with this. I will be increasing the duration for that reason.
 

chloe924

Member
So, many months of fogging at night have led to the following results...

No mold or mildew build up. No respiratory issues. Occasionally clean out the base unit while filling the reservoir. No signs of dehydration.

I have cut back on misting during the day, but the plants have not done well with this. I will be increasing the duration for that reason.

Hello
I had a lot of issues keeping my Chameleon hydrated and finally took the plunge on trying a humidifier at night over a month ago. After needing to give him meds that would affect his kidneys. So firstly, this thread really helped me when figuring out the best method, so thank you for helping this long time lurker! :) Overnight hydration has really helped keep his urates whiter and saved me from a lot of stress.

However I have the same humidifier as you and have found it a bit of a pain to clean. So I was wondering, do you seal the base at all when in use? Or anything to avoid mold growing? Admittedly my house has a humidity problem (not helped my multiple fish tanks and a mist king mind lol) so it was always going to be more of an issue. Currently I only use it every other day and clean/ thoroughly dry it between uses.
 
Top Bottom