Need Help With Veiled Chameleon Eggs

I just got home from picking up what turned out to be a pair of Veiled Chameleons. My problem is that the guy also handed me a plastic shoebox with eggs in it. I was caught off guard, so didn’t ask any questions. Once Home, I looked under the box and could see what looks like a healthy group of eggs. I’ve never tried to breed chameleons before, so this is new territory for me. I'm guessing the eggs are about a month old because the guy told me that the chameleons are about 6 months old.

So here are my questions.. First, is there a way to tell if they are fertile? I’m sure this is her first clutch. Next, should I dig them up and put them in a better prepared box? The box they are in now is very thin and cheap, there’s no lid and I’m pretty sure they are buried in dry potting soil. Any thoughts or tips would be appreciated. Thanks again!

Google,
 

jannb

Chameleon Enthusiast
Put the eggs in a plastic Tupperware shoe box with about 3 inches of moist vermiculite and keep them in a closet where the temps with be around 76 degrees. I punch two tiny holes in the lid. To test for moisture, take a fist full of the vermiculite and squeeze it, if no more than a drop or two of water comes out then the moisture level should be okay. Do not turn the eggs as you move them from where they were laid to the container. Lay them in rows about an inch apart in all directions in shallow dents made with your thumb in the vermiculite. Put the lid on and place them in a dark place where the temperature is between 72-78 F. Moisture will form on the sides of the container and underside of the lid. It takes about 8 to 9 months for the eggs to hatch. It they are not fertile they will mold over in a couple of weeks.
 
Put the eggs in a plastic Tupperware shoe box with about 3 inches of moist vermiculite and keep them in a closet where the temps with be around 76 degrees. I punch two tiny holes in the lid. To test for moisture, take a fist full of the vermiculite and squeeze it, if no more than a drop or two of water comes out then the moisture level should be okay. Do not turn the eggs as you move them from where they were laid to the container. Lay them in rows about an inch apart in all directions in shallow dents made with your thumb in the vermiculite. Put the lid on and place them in a dark place where the temperature is between 72-78 F. Moisture will form on the sides of the container and underside of the lid. It takes about 8 to 9 months for the eggs to hatch. It they are not fertile they will mold over in a couple of weeks.
Perfect! Thank you! I I will do this today. Right now they are still burried. I haven’t disturbed anything. I only saw some of them through the bottom of the container. Couple of questions, how often is it appropriate to open the lid to check on them? Also, does anyone ever put them in some type of incubator? Does that help keep a consistent temperature? Thanks so much!
 

Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
I’m not a fan of incubators. I’ve never found one reliable enough to justify the price as a recreational breeder. I’m sure lots of people use them successfully, that’s just my preference. I live in the south so it never gets so cold that they won’t hatch just fine at room temperature.

You won’t find a better source of Veild information than Jann.

Below are a couple of my egg bins a month into a retained clutch. You can see which were fertile and which ones weren’t and started to mold quickly.

I’m a little embarrassed to post these other pictures but I’m going to do it anyway so you can see the results of not following proven incubation practices strictly. I lost several near full term hatchlings due to me having too much water in my bins. I also had a problem with bacteria due to me not boiling the water to be used in my bins a head of time. These two mistakes ultimately ended up causing the shells to weaken(bacteria) and explode from the eggs taking in too much water. That’s right, I said explode and I mean it. Zoom in on the last pic if you can handle it.

The pictures below aren’t easy to look at but this is the reality of what can happen if your not on top of your game.
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KingGoodman

Member
Also it helps to bake the vermiculite at the highest temperature your oven can handle for a while. This fully sterilizes it and reduces the risk of mold.
 
I’m not a fan of incubators. I’ve never found one reliable enough to justify the price as a recreational breeder. I’m sure lots of people use them successfully, that’s just my preference. I live in the south so it never gets so cold that they won’t hatch just fine at room temperature.

You won’t find a better source of Veild information than Jann.

Below are a couple of my egg bins a month into a retained clutch. You can see which were fertile and which ones weren’t and started to mold quickly.

I’m a little embarrassed to post these other pictures but I’m going to do it anyway so you can see the results of not following proven incubation practices strictly. I lost several near full term hatchlings due to me having too much water in my bins. I also had a problem with bacteria due to me not boiling the water to be used in my bins a head of time. These two mistakes ultimately ended up causing the shells to weaken(bacteria) and explode from the eggs taking in too much water. That’s right, I said explode and I mean it. Zoom in on the last pic if you can handle it.

The pictures below aren’t easy to look at but this is the reality of what can happen if your not on top of your game.View attachment 217011View attachment 217012View attachment 217013View attachment 217014View attachment 217015

I really appreciate your comments, photos and honesty. I will definitely follow your suggestions!

I have another question... The pair of Veiled chameleons came in an 18x18x36 screen cage. I have ordered a 24x24x48. My plan was to move male to larger cage, but am now not sure about separating them. They seem to hang out together a lot and I see no negative behaviors towards each other. They are supposedly about 6 months old and have been together since babies. (The guy said they came from different breeders.)

I was told by my local reptile shop owner that separating them might stress them out since they have grown up together. Any thoughts would be appreciated... Thanks!
 

jannb

Chameleon Enthusiast
I really appreciate your comments, photos and honesty. I will definitely follow your suggestions!

I have another question... The pair of Veiled chameleons came in an 18x18x36 screen cage. I have ordered a 24x24x48. My plan was to move male to larger cage, but am now not sure about separating them. They seem to hang out together a lot and I see no negative behaviors towards each other. They are supposedly about 6 months old and have been together since babies. (The guy said they came from different breeders.)

I was told by my local reptile shop owner that separating them might stress them out since they have grown up together. Any thoughts would be appreciated... Thanks!
They should be separated immediately. Veiled chameleons, as most chameleons, are solitary animals and should not even see eachother. A partition should be between their enclosures or they should be kept in separate room. At 6 months old they will be mating and that could be dangerous for their health, especially the female. I wouldn’t breed either sex before a year old.
 
They should be separated immediately. Veiled chameleons, as most chameleons, are solitary animals and should not even see eachother. A partition should be between their enclosures or they should be kept in separate room. At 6 months old they will be mating and that could be dangerous for their health, especially the female. I wouldn’t breed either sex before a year old.

Thank you! That is what I thought! I always heard that they need separate cages and shouldn’t be kept near each other, but wanted to double check because sometimes information changes. These were given to me late Sunday by a guy that just didn’t want to deal with them any more. Unfortunately they had already bred, as he also gave me the clutch of eggs. I suspect that they may have mated again, but not sure.

I am picking up the new, larger cage today and will separate them tomorrow. Any other thoughts that might be of help? I had a beautiful male Veiled years ago, but honestly, these guys came very unexpectedly, so I haven’t had a chance to catch up on the latest info and haven’t had a female before. I appreciate your Help! Thanks so much!
 

Attachments

jannb

Chameleon Enthusiast
The female will need a laying bin ASAP. I’ll link you to some blogs and a video about making a laying bin.
https://www.chameleonforums.com/blo...-with-young-veiled-or-panther-chameleons.325/
https://www.chameleonforums.com/blogs/egg-laying-and-the-laying-bin.345/
https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/laying-bin-set-up-educational-video.77225/

I also highly recommend pet insurance. The females often have egg laying problems that require surgery and without insurance that can be very expensive. I use Nationwide Pet Insurance and it’s only $8.00 a month per chameleon and you get a multi pet discount and another discount if you by by the year. It has a $50.00 deductible and then pays 90%.
https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/pet-insurance-is-very-important.160267/
 
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ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
The female will need a laying bin ASAP. I’ll link you to some blogs and a video about making a laying bin.
https://www.chameleonforums.com/blo...-with-young-veiled-or-panther-chameleons.325/
https://www.chameleonforums.com/blogs/egg-laying-and-the-laying-bin.345/
https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/laying-bin-set-up-educational-video.77225/

I also highly recommend pet insurance. The females often have egg laying problems that require surgery and without insurance that can be very expensive. I use Nationwide Pet Insurance and it’s only $8.00 a month per chameleon and you get a multi pet discount and another discount if you by by the year. It has a $50.00 deductible and then pays 90%.
I also have pet insurance, totally worth it! And the veiled care sheet here is a great source of info, as well!
 

jannb

Chameleon Enthusiast
Thank you both for mentioning the pet insurance! I had no idea you could get that for reptiles! LOL! I will check out the links.... Have a great day!
You are very welcome. I love these little animals and always glad to help.

Do you have a good chameleon vet already? I might be able to recommend one.
 
You are very welcome. I love these little animals and always glad to help.

Do you have a good chameleon vet already? I might be able to recommend one.[/QUOTE
We are pretty fortunate to have a good exotic animal vet nearbye. I know they see chameleons and other reptiles, so I think we’re set. I appreciate all your help. I will be picking up the new cage tomorrow and will get them squared away over the weekend. Thanks again! Am hoping my main questions have been answered.... if I think of anything else, I will post again.
 
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