How much to feed your chameleon - YouTube video

Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
How much and how often should you feed your chameleon? This is a popular question, and one you should you definitely ask. It's going to depend on how old your chameleon is.


Here are some general guidelines:
Baby less than 3 months: As much as they will eat 2x a day
Juvenile 3-9 months: 8-12 feeders 1x day in the morning
Adult 12+ months: 3-5 feeders every other day in the morning

Keep in mind that every chameleon is different and there will be variations. As long as your chameleon continues to grow at a healthy rate as a baby, and isn't overweight as an adult you're probably okay.
 

Lfirgard

New Member
How much and how often should you feed your chameleon? This is a popular question, and one you should you definitely ask. It's going to depend on how old your chameleon is.


Here are some general guidelines:
Baby less than 3 months: As much as they will eat 2x a day
Juvenile 3-9 months: 8-12 feeders 1x day in the morning
Adult 12+ months: 3-5 feeders every other day in the morning

Keep in mind that every chameleon is different and there will be variations. As long as your chameleon continues to grow at a healthy rate as a baby, and isn't overweight as an adult you're probably okay.
I have a pair of young panther chameleons bought 3 months ago. The female is now 4” not including her tail. The male is more than twice her size. He was not much bigger than her when I got them. He is a very healthy eater. She however is not. Should I be concerned? I give calcium daily in their drip watered. I also mist several times a day. Vitamins once to twice a week on crickets.
 

Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
I have a pair of young panther chameleons bought 3 months ago. The female is now 4” not including her tail. The male is more than twice her size. He was not much bigger than her when I got them. He is a very healthy eater. She however is not. Should I be concerned? I give calcium daily in their drip watered. I also mist several times a day. Vitamins once to twice a week on crickets.

Congrats on the new chameleons :) Very exciting.

Hmmm there are a lot of things that could be contributing to this, but incorrect husbandry would be a good guess. Are they housed together? Calcium in their water is not the correct way to supplement a chameleon. You want to be dusting gutloaded bugs with calcium.

Here is a video all about supplementation:



I'm more than happy to help you further, but it would be helpful for you to fill out this form: https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/how-to-ask-for-help.66/

Please include pictures. It would also be helpful to start your own thread :)
 

Lfirgard

New Member
How much and how often should you feed your chameleon? This is a popular question, and one you should you definitely ask. It's going to depend on how old your chameleon is.


Here are some general guidelines:
Baby less than 3 months: As much as they will eat 2x a day
Juvenile 3-9 months: 8-12 feeders 1x day in the morning
Adult 12+ months: 3-5 feeders every other day in the morning

Keep in mind that every chameleon is different and there will be variations. As long as your chameleon continues to grow at a healthy rate as a baby, and isn't overweight as an adult you're probably okay.
I have a pair of young panther chameleons bought 3 months ago. The female is now 4” not including her tail. The male is more than twice her size. He was not much bigger than her when I got them. He is a very healthy eater. She however is not. Should I be concerned? I give calcium daily in their drip watered. I also mist several times a day. Vitamins once to twice a week on crickets
Congrats on the new chameleons :) Very exciting.

Hmmm there are a lot of things that could be contributing to this, but incorrect husbandry would be a good guess. Are they housed together? Calcium in their water is not the correct way to supplement a chameleon. You want to be dusting gutloaded bugs with calcium.

Here is a video all about supplementation:



I'm more than happy to help you further, but it would be helpful for you to fill out this form: https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/how-to-ask-for-help.66/9456A629-BBC6-4CE9-8642-BB8353E8A51F.jpegFD665FAC-581D-46CF-B0D8-BB69CF4C2D55.jpeg1B388A81-351C-4834-8DD5-8108CCEDA62D.jpeg29B6BAA0-AC47-4A85-902A-5FDE96EC60AB.jpeg0F7B9724-B8CB-4B16-B3C9-CE1488C4651D.jpeg18F337C6-EC38-4A37-AEE1-CD61D5A47274.jpeg3B8BABA1-A262-4CD1-836A-89F4E97FADDA.jpegCD6F1688-52E8-4631-BA86-425D53591203.jpeg

Please include pictures. It would also be helpful to start your own thread :)
I have a greenhouse that ranges between 40 & 60% humidity. It gets natural light from east south and west. The temp ranges from 70 to 85. I have an exhaust fan that kicks on at 85. They both bask everyday in direct sun for most the day. They both live in the tree but I have seen the male down in the foliage around the tree. I have a dripper that runs all the time but I also do a complete mist of the tree 4or 5 times a day. I have a plastic container in the tree that I put fresh crickets in daily. I do dust them with the revival. Also the vitamins a few times a week. I keep my crickets in a larger tote where I feed them flunkers complete cricket. You can see the difference in size in the one pic. I don’t handle the male very often but the female I do to put her down by the feeder every morning. They both will drink from a spray bottle that I hold and let drip. I do this to make sure they are getting water since I don’t always see them drink. They both just did a shed. There are a few spots on both where there is still a bit of skin holding on. I tried doing my own thread but apparently I’m not doing something correctly or I need to try with a desktop computer. Thanks for your help!
 

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Lfirgard

New Member
More pics
 

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Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
Sorry it took me so long to respond - holiday season = family time :)
So I definitely see some things about your husbandry that could be contributing to the females lack of eating and slower growth. The biggest things you need to change are adding in UVB and changing your supplements.

I have a greenhouse that ranges between 40 & 60% humidity. This is good
It gets natural light from east south and west. So this is the biggest red flag I see. Windows block out UVB so as of right now, your chameleons aren't getting any UVB. This is what allows them to process the calcium they receive in their supplements so that they can have strong bones and functioning organs. You'll need to purchase a *linear T5 HO UVB fixture and bulb* ASAP.
The temp ranges from 70 to 85. I have an exhaust fan that kicks on at 85. They both bask everyday in direct sun for most the day. They both live in the tree but I have seen the male down in the foliage around the tree. These temps are fine as babies. As adults the male will want a hotter basking temp to be able to process food.
I have a dripper that runs all the time but I also do a complete mist of the tree 4or 5 times a day. How long are you misting for? 4-5 times a day is a lot. Most keepers spray once in the morning and once at night for 3-5 minutes. Too much misting can result in a upper respiratory infection.
I have a plastic container in the tree that I put fresh crickets in daily. Try feeding different types of bugs such as dubia roaches, hornworms, super worms, black solider fly larvae, etc.
I do dust them with the revival. Also the vitamins a few times a week. I'd stop using that ReptoCal because it has vitamin D3 - too much vitamin D3 can cause toxicity and cause SERIOUS HARM to your chameleon. You want to be using calcium without D3. Please watch this video about proper supplementation:



I keep my crickets in a larger tote where I feed them flunkers complete cricket. Flukers is not a great gutload. You're better off with fresh fruits and veggies. See video below:

 

Lfirgard

New Member
Thank you for the great suggestions. Got a lamp on her today. I halos have hung a heat lamp over the tree as well . Red one for night. I’ve tried roaches but neither have been interested. I do feed wax worms. Hand feed them to the male. Tried with female but she won’t eat from my hand. Will pick up a different calcium product tomorrow.
Both chameleons have eaten flies that I saw. The greenhouse is 15x40 and there’s often insects of all kinds.
i have crimson day geckos, salamander and 2 Axolotls that have been doing great for the last year.
Are there any other reasons for my female chameleon to not grow very fast like the male did. Also curious as to why the male seems to be doing well. I will get some more lights to hang around the tree. Also get a larger container to keep and feed my crickets better.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
You said..."They both live in the tree" ...it's very likely that if there is nowhere else for th e female to go but the same tree as the male she is stressed out by not being able to get far away from him.

There should be no lights on at night...BTW.

@Gingero has already addressed gutloading and supplements which need some work too.
 

Lfirgard

New Member
Its a very large tree. 8 ft tall a good 4 feet across. There are times they are at opposite ends of the tree but when sleeping they are within a foot of each other. Im out today to get good lighting. thank you for all the help!
 

coastal_chameleon

Avid Member
Sorry it took me so long to respond - holiday season = family time :)
So I definitely see some things about your husbandry that could be contributing to the females lack of eating and slower growth. The biggest things you need to change are adding in UVB and changing your supplements.

I have a greenhouse that ranges between 40 & 60% humidity. This is good
It gets natural light from east south and west. So this is the biggest red flag I see. Windows block out UVB so as of right now, your chameleons aren't getting any UVB. This is what allows them to process the calcium they receive in their supplements so that they can have strong bones and functioning organs. You'll need to purchase a *linear T5 HO UVB fixture and bulb* ASAP.
The temp ranges from 70 to 85. I have an exhaust fan that kicks on at 85. They both bask everyday in direct sun for most the day. They both live in the tree but I have seen the male down in the foliage around the tree. These temps are fine as babies. As adults the male will want a hotter basking temp to be able to process food.
I have a dripper that runs all the time but I also do a complete mist of the tree 4or 5 times a day. How long are you misting for? 4-5 times a day is a lot. Most keepers spray once in the morning and once at night for 3-5 minutes. Too much misting can result in a upper respiratory infection.
I have a plastic container in the tree that I put fresh crickets in daily. Try feeding different types of bugs such as dubia roaches, hornworms, super worms, black solider fly larvae, etc.
I do dust them with the revival. Also the vitamins a few times a week. I'd stop using that ReptoCal because it has vitamin D3 - too much vitamin D3 can cause toxicity and cause SERIOUS HARM to your chameleon. You want to be using calcium without D3. Please watch this video about proper supplementation:



I keep my crickets in a larger tote where I feed them flunkers complete cricket. Flukers is not a great gutload. You're better off with fresh fruits and veggies. See video below:

just to add, The exo terra multi vitamin also has d3 , that's why im using reptivite . when using the reptivite I add a bit of phosphorous free calcium as the calcium to phosphorous ratio isn't ideal in reptivite .
 

Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
Couple of things to add...

Red lights are a big no-no for chameleons. It inhibits their ability to see UVA and causes them stress. If you need warmer temperatures at night (anything below 60F) then consider getting a ceramic heat emitter or portable room heater.

Try not too feed too many wax worms since these are high in fat. Better options would be dubia roaches, BSFL, super worms, etc.

What lights and calcium did you end up picking up?
 

cyberlocc

Chameleon Enthusiast
Red lights are a big no-no for chameleons. It inhibits their ability to see UVA and causes them stress. If you need warmer temperatures at night (anything below 60F) then consider getting a ceramic heat emitter or portable room heater.

What do you mean "Inhibits their ability to see UVA"?
 

Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
I like how the first link is @cyberlocc informative post. I think there might be some confusion.

Oh wow. My bad. @cyberlocc - can you help clarify what you meant? I reread that post many, many times trying to understand the science behind why red lights are bad. Sounds like I misunderstood. Everyone just says they are bad and to not use them. I was trying to understand WHY... you can see that in the 2nd link.
 

cyberlocc

Chameleon Enthusiast

You just used me to me :).


I like how the first link is @cyberlocc informative post. I think there might be some confusion.

LOL, ya that was a good one.


Oh wow. My bad. @cyberlocc - can you help clarify what you meant? I reread that post many, many times trying to understand the science behind why red lights are bad. Sounds like I misunderstood. Everyone just says they are bad and to not use them. I was trying to understand WHY... you can see that in the 2nd link.

Ya I think I was confused about what you were saying, or you were by what I was.

When I spoke about red light, and the alteration of color vision and UVA, I meant adding reds during the day. A red light, as a lone source for instance (outside of UVB of course). Not during the night time, and when I read what you said I took it as a long term damage to the parietal eye (as I have seen that said by people, but never any reasoning or evidence of such) or to the cones of vision. Which I dont see how red light could affect the eye in a long term way, just night light is generally frowned upon.

Now for the same reason I do not see how it could damage, is the same logic the company's that make those bulbs use to think they are okay.

Here is a great article that touches on it. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060415111626.htm

So the consensus seems to be, that the parietal eye only has photo receptiveness of Blue and Green, therefore it cannot register red color spectrum. To that end, a red light in theory should not bother a chameleons sleep cycle, however its said that it does. I truly have not seen or experienced either of these, never tried to use a "red" light at night. So I am not sure tbh, if they can sense that red light or not. Obviously we have too schools of thought on this, we have the pet company's selling these lights and the community of keepers advising against them.

Alot of it could in fact come down to both camps being right, at face value. The keepers are right that the bulbs are interrupting to sleep of their chams, and the science behind the idea of them from the company's that make them logic is also sound. It may in fact be the execution in the product that is in fact flawed.

As I spoke of, with the cheap LEDs in that post you linked, the same likely applies here. The company's went out to produce a "Red Light" and in that they took a bulb and tinted the glass thinking "Okay, we have red light" however they really dont, they have a white light with a slight red tint. On the surface, to us this light appears red, and it is. However its not a red light in the essence of the spectrum of light that the photo receptors do not detect. Like calling a 2700k a "red Light", its not Far Red light, its not even Photo red light, its just the right blend of spectrum and tinting to make it appear to us as a "Red Light", when in reality its green light tinted.


Either way in regards to this particular case, to @Lfirgard or anyone else requiring night heat, I think the safest option is that of substitution, as OP has said there is Ceramic heat emitters, and there is Infared lights now available to us. Both of which, do not waste power on emitting light, and they release the infrared that is needed to heat to the bone, deeply, they are preferable at any case so just going with that and leaving the why out of it is probably the best course, however if we must have an answer as to why, I would think its in the execution, we would need to test the "red lights" and see what spectrums they are actually emitting. That might be a fun project to do, when I get the time :).

Oh and great video, I liked it alot :), going to watch some more of them :)
 
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Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
I think we are in agreement when it comes to providing additional heat at night. My comment above was in reference to red lights during the day time. What I took away from your older post was that red lights during the day time inhibit a chameleon's ability to properly see UVA and therefore know what foods are safe to eat.
Did I interpret your past thread correctly or not quite?
 

cyberlocc

Chameleon Enthusiast
ent when it comes to providing additional heat at night. My comment above was in reference to red lights during the day time. What I took away from your older post was that red lights during the day time inhibit a chameleon's ability to properly see UVA and therefore know what foods are safe to eat.
Did I interpret your past thread correctly or not quite?

Yes, strong red light during the Day, does that :) that is correct :).
 

Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
Phew! Okay cool. I guess if it only inhibits their ability to eat, *theoretically* shouldn't matter if red lights are on at light. (not saying they should be, just interesting to think about)
 
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