18 babies and counting!

danielle609

Established Member
On September 25th 2 clutched of Sambava babies started to hatch. As of Currently I have 18 out of the egg and 3 eggs piped. I have 24 eggs left in the oldest clutch and 5 in the newest. I have had 14 hatch from the newest clutch. About 3 months ago some of the eggs went bad in the newest clutch. Well yesterday one of the eggs that has started sweating a while ago started looking funny, so I carefully cut it open. Inside was a fully developed dead baby, with its tounge sticking out, its eyes buldging and its head was black. (sorry for the gory description). But has anyone experienced this before? Do I just leave this death to nature and that it wasn't strong enough to hatch, so it wouldn't be suited for life outside of the egg? I just feel bad, like I did something wrong. I thought all my babies would be hatched by now, but they have been hatching at a rate of 1-2 a day...I thought they all hatched around the same time...I guess not.

But on a very happy note, all of the 18 that have hatched are doing wonderful. 1 has already shed. They are eating a ton, pooping a ton, and drinking a ton...everything I had wished for :)....and when I say poop a ton...that isn't exagerating...I didn't realize how much more "regular" they are than adults....:) But Ok I know this post is jumbled, along with all of my others, but I would love feedback from anyone that takes the time to read through this :) Thanks!

Dani
 

Brad Ramsey

Retired Moderator
How close together didi you have the eggs positioned in the incubation container?
How did you incubate them?

-Brad
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
In nature the eggs would all hatch at the same time because they are all in close proximity to each other. They all need to hatch together to dig out of the hole.

If the eggs are spaced apart by about 1" in all directions they will hatch more individually. IMHO that's better.

As for the fully formed baby in the egg...it could be the moisture level of the substrate or possibly the incubation temperature playing a part too. Its a much more common event in panther eggs than in veileds.
 

danielle609

Established Member
How close together didi you have the eggs positioned in the incubation container?
How did you incubate them?

-Brad
I had them in vermiculite maybe at most an inch away from each other. I incubated them in a dresser drawer. The temps would range from 68-80...once I caught the temperature at 85. But unfortunately I don't have a place in my house that will stay 1 temperature. How did those temps look? Thanks for the reply!
 

danielle609

Established Member
In nature the eggs would all hatch at the same time because they are all in close proximity to each other. They all need to hatch together to dig out of the hole.

If the eggs are spaced apart by about 1" in all directions they will hatch more individually. IMHO that's better.

As for the fully formed baby in the egg...it could be the moisture level of the substrate or possibly the incubation temperature playing a part too. Its a much more common event in panther eggs than in veileds.
Thanks for the reply! Are panthers more sensitive to environment change while they are developing? I just hope that is was just that one...but only time will tell!

here is a link to another thread I had with a bunch of pictures! https://www.chameleonforums.com/new-camera-tons-o-16314/
 

boothy

New Member
me personally i like to let the strong survive , in the wild only the strong survive because the best genes are the ones that are going to make it all the way and i want that in captive bred animals i want top pure and very strong bloodlines so that the animals i am breeding dont incounter any problems at all , and in the long run it doesnt come back on you when you sell a 3 month old panther to someone and it dies because it just wasnt strong enough to survive , im not saying it will happen , just saying it could and why create that situation when all you do is let the strong survive, in the long run its better for the species of the animal
 
Top Bottom