Zero water filter... Need feedback from smart people :)

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
It’s really gross looking and makes me wonder what the heck is in my tap water.
This site will tell you what the heck is in your tap water: EWG's Tap Water Database

When I use Zero water in that same humidifier, even after many gallons, there is barely a thin membrane of chalk which isn’t even enough to justify cleaning.
I asked if you could define "barely", and you've defined it with "barely". 🤪

In my mind, a reading of "000" shouldn't leave a membrane of chalk, or it isn't really "000".
I haven't been able to find anything on the accuracy/fallibility of ZW's meter, and that seems to be the only device used to measure TDS. From a critical viewpoint, that doesn't seem objective or even scientific to me.

It may take longer to build up, but in time, membrane upon membrane will still build up, which doesn't happen with distilled water.

I ran a crude unscientific seat-of-the-pants cost calculation in post #20, assuming a TDS of 250. If someone had really bad water—say a TDS of 500 (rare, but not unheard of), the cost per gallon to filter tap water would increase to $1 per gallon, which is comparable to buying distilled. If RO can be gotten for $.38 per gallon (post #29) that seems more economical (out of pocket) than ZW.
 

Andrew1283

Established Member
I asked if you could define "barely", and you've defined it with "barely". 🤪

In my mind, a reading of "000" shouldn't leave a membrane of chalk, or it isn't really "000".
I haven't been able to find anything on the accuracy/fallibility of ZW's meter, and that seems to be the only device used to measure TDS. From a critical viewpoint, that doesn't seem objective or even scientific to me.
I don’t know how technical we need to get about minerals in filtered water. The Zero water filter will remove substantially all the total dissolved solids in your tap water. We are talking about misting chameleon cages, not sending humans to Mars. 😂

I described the residue as, “a thin membrane of chalk which isn’t even enough to justify cleaning”. I can’t describe it any better. 😝
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Anyone know how I would go about finding out the water quality on those fill up stations at the grocery store? I found one at the store about 4 minutes away from my house. Tried asking the safeway employee but she had no idea.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
I don’t know how technical we need to get about minerals in filtered water. The Zero water filter will remove substantially all the total dissolved solids in your tap water. We are talking about misting chameleon cages, not sending humans to Mars. 😂
I thought we were talking about the possibility of having to replace a misting pump.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Anyone know how I would go about finding out the water quality on those fill up stations at the grocery store? I found one at the store about 4 minutes away from my house. Tried asking the safeway employee but she had no idea.
If the station says it's RO water, it should be safe unless there is some kind of fraud.
I would look to see if the owner of the station (and water being sold) is a reputable company or not.
 

Thompson

Chameleon Enthusiast
AFAIK. As I said previously, I'm not concerned as much about nozzles (~$12 ea) that can be cleaned as I am about having to replace a pump ($90-$135).
I'm confused as to why you can't just run the vinegar/concentrated lemon juice ect. to dissolve the calcium and other minerals that have built up throughout the entire system (pump, nozzles, and pipes included)? You could try warming the vinegar enough so that the acetic acid is more concentrated, but not too hot where you begin to boil the vinegar so that you don't cause it to move to a more acidic and corrosive state, but that way the vinegar will be able to dissolve the mineral deposits clogging your system.

Just a thought.
 

dinomom

Avid Member

Jevin

Chameleon Enthusiast
Cleaning a pump is more involved than that.
https://current-usa.com/clean-aquariums-dc-water-flow-pumps-10-steps/
Eventually, the acids can deteriorate parts & seals, leading to leaks, low pressure, and failure.
Why not avoid it and prolong the life of the pump?
I was just going to point out that dissolved minerals, such as calcium, only precipitate out of the water if certain conditions are met, like higher water temperatures. This was pointed out in the link though. Often the higher temperatures found in a hot water heater cause the calcium to precipitate and failure or poor performance of a water heater, including low output.

To my knowledge, the only part on the MistKing pump that would really be emitting any heat would be the shaft from the motor. However the MistKing pump uses a diaphragm system, so the shaft isn't actually exposed to the water.

I think the biggest issues would be buildup at the nozzles causing pressure to back log in the system and rupturing the diaphragm.
 

Andrew1283

Established Member
Cleaning a pump is more involved than that.
https://current-usa.com/clean-aquariums-dc-water-flow-pumps-10-steps/
Eventually, the acids can deteriorate parts & seals, leading to leaks, low pressure, and failure.
Why not avoid it and prolong the life of the pump?
I don’t have a misting system but I would imagine if you filled it with water from a Zero water filter, which removes substantially all total dissolved solids, it would take quite a while for mineral deposits to build up to the point where they burn out a motor. And if I got 3+ years of usage (just guessing) I wouldn’t blame the burn out on the water I used, I would just consider it an old mister pump which served its purpose and put it out to pasture, then buy a new one. Powerheads and pumps in my salt water tanks all eventually quit (no matter how often I soak them in vinegar) because they are motorized devices, usually plastic, and that’s just part of the hobby.

I do think buying RO from your local store with a tap is the best and cheapest option. I just can’t lug those jugs around anymore with my lower back issues. That’s why I use the Zero filter pitcher. And the RO systems at home can be an expensive investment.
 
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Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
I don’t have a misting system but I would imagine if you filled it with water from a Zero water filter, which removes substantially all total dissolved solids, it would take quite a while for mineral deposits to build up to the point where they burn out a motor. And if I got 3+ years of usage (just guessing) I wouldn’t blame the burn out on the water I used, I would just consider it an old mister pump which served its purpose and put it out to pasture, then buy a new one. Powerheads and pumps in my salt water tanks all eventually quit (no matter how often I soak them in vinegar) because they are motorized devices, usually plastic, and that’s just part of the hobby.
I already acknowledged if ZW performs as touted...
https://www.chameleonforums.com/thr...edback-from-smart-people.182621/#post-1666293
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Anyone know how I would go about finding out the water quality on those fill up stations at the grocery store? I found one at the store about 4 minutes away from my house. Tried asking the safeway employee but she had no idea.
I thought a friend gifted you an RO system(?) :unsure:
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Ok so question and please explain in simple terms lol. I have one of those TDS meters that measures in PPM. I tested my tap water and it read 201 PPM. I got RO from the machine (very excited to see it clearly printed on it that it was in fact RO) and measured it and it tested 009 PPM. Now I do not know what any of that means. What number am I looking for it to be under?
 

dinomom

Avid Member
Ok so question and please explain in simple terms lol. I have one of those TDS meters that measures in PPM. I tested my tap water and it read 201 PPM. I got RO from the machine (very excited to see it clearly printed on it that it was in fact RO) and measured it and it tested 009 PPM. Now I do not know what any of that means. What number am I looking for it to be under?
Your tap water is hard-I am not a scientist but I believe that # means it has 201 parts per million of "stuff"-minerals, etc. It would NOT be good for MK or humidifier.

9 PPM is a-ok. "Perfect" R/O is zero parts per million but if you are under maybe 15 or so you will be fine.

You're just trying to get the lowest possible amount of calcium and other minerals that can leave deposits, but there will always be some.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Your tap water is hard-I am not a scientist but I believe that # means it has 201 parts per million of "stuff"-minerals, etc. It would NOT be good for MK or humidifier.

9 PPM is a-ok. "Perfect" R/O is zero parts per million but if you are under maybe 15 or so you will be fine.

You're just trying to get the lowest possible amount of calcium and other minerals that can leave deposits, but there will always be some.
So a 9 PPM reading then would be far better then my tap water of 201 PPM lol. :hilarious: Ugggg who knew keeping chameleons would make you learn soooooooo many different things.

Head Explode GIF by memecandy
 

Lpsouth1978

Avid Member
So a 9 PPM reading then would be far better then my tap water of 201 PPM lol. :hilarious: Ugggg who knew keeping chameleons would make you learn soooooooo many different things.

Head Explode GIF by memecandy
yes, 9ppm is good. In order to get it any lower, you would have to run that water through DI resin, but it is not worth it for what you want, IMO. 9ppm is VERY clean water with almost ZERO dissolved solids to gum up your pump or nozzles.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
yes, 9ppm is good. In order to get it any lower, you would have to run that water through DI resin, but it is not worth it for what you want, IMO. 9ppm is VERY clean water with almost ZERO dissolved solids to gum up your pump or nozzles.
Thank you so much for all your feedback. Totally excited that I found this water fill up literally 1 minute from my house at the Circle K. Only 35 cents a gallon too.
 
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