Tiger Chameleons

jandie

New Member
Probably not a possibility, but I have to ask....

Does anyone know of any places that might import or carry tiger chameleons? :D
 

jandie

New Member
a smaller species of cham....

http://www.arkive.org/tiger-chameleon/archaius-tigris/#text=Description


Picture of a white tiger:




Yellow with spots:




Just very recently become interested in them, but can't seem to find anything "advertised" regarding any kept in the US....

Classified as Endangered (EN) on the IUCN Red List (3) and listed on Appendix II of CITES ....but i don't know exactly what that means...lol.... I would think if they're endangered....some sort of attempts would be made to increase numbers....
 

Cainschams

New Member
Probably not a possibility, but I have to ask....

Does anyone know of any places that might import or carry tiger chameleons? :D
There are very few being worked with over seas. Not even sure how that one group is doing that were pictured on the forums a while ago. To answer your question though, no. If there were Chuck G would be bullying them to export him some LOL!!!

Very very neat looking chameleons though.
 

jandie

New Member
There are very few being worked with over seas. Not even sure how that one group is doing that were pictured on the forums a while ago. To answer your question though, no. If there were Chuck G would be bullying them to export him some LOL!!!

Very very neat looking chameleons though.
LOL...so i should first work on chuck and then see where he can get with it? ;P
 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
Archaius tigris is still fairly newly discovered and is therefore not available for import/export yet to my knowledge.
No, they were described in 1820 its just that in 2010, based on their genetic relationship to other chameleon species, the genus Archaius (which was originally described in 1845 but later synopsized with another genus) was resurrected and this species was placed in it as its sole member.

They are being worked with in limited numbers in Europe but they are not available in the US currently. The Seychelles has not commonly exported this species and the captive bloodlines are very limited from what I understand.

Chris
 
No, they were described in 1820 its just that in 2010, based on their genetic relationship to other chameleon species, the genus Archaius (which was originally described in 1845 but later synopsized with another genus) was resurrected and this species was placed in it as its sole member.

They are being worked with in limited numbers in Europe but they are not available in the US currently. The Seychelles has not commonly exported this species and the captive bloodlines are very limited from what I understand.

Chris
thats goofy lol, from my understanding they were considered calumma and then replaced in the genus archaius right? when were they discovered? i thought it was one of the newest chameleons discovered. sorry man, i must have just forgot or misread the article. its been quite sometime.
 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
thats goofy lol, from my understanding they were considered calumma and then replaced in the genus archaius right? when were they discovered? i thought it was one of the newest chameleons discovered. sorry man, i must have just forgot or misread the article. its been quite sometime.
They were first described in 1820 as Chamaeleo tigris and while they are currently classified as Archaius tigris, they have previously been classified as Lophosaura tigris and Calumma tigris. The genus a species is placed in is based on our understanding of their relation to other species and as we learn more about their relationships, the genus they are placed in can change. That said, this species has been officially known to science (i.e. described) since 1820.

Chris
 
They were first described in 1820 as Chamaeleo tigris and while they are currently classified as Archaius tigris, they have previously been classified as Lophosaura tigris and Calumma tigris. The genus a species is placed in is based on our understanding of their relation to other species and as we learn more about their relationships, the genus they are placed in can change. That said, this species has been officially known to science (i.e. described) since 1820.

Chris
thanks man. i have heard of species being categorized into another genus' before, but now i understand why. as far as tigris, i never knew they were registered that far back ago, maybe its the change in genus that makes it seem to me like it is recently discovered lol
 

Chuck G

Avid Member
Thanks for bringing this up guys! This is my dream chameleon.
I will get some if they are ever available and yes I will sell someone else's kidney to do it.
 

chameleonneeds

Avid Member
Lol Chuck, Id give up my kidney for you but I also like these chams, so if Im loosing a kidney I'l take them for myself ;)
Ah but wow it will be a LONG time since anything like this comes close to south africa.
I will stick to my rare trioceros and pardalis for now :p
 

eisentrauti

Avid Member
The papers which were given around when they were sold here aren't good enough to get a CITES export permit. So they wont be every available (legally) in the USA
 

jandie

New Member
The papers which were given around when they were sold here aren't good enough to get a CITES export permit. So they wont be every available (legally) in the USA
from what i understood, there were some already brought into the u.s., so i'm not sure if that was a change in the CITES permit or not since that time (i will be completely honest in a lack of knowledge of CITES and requirements and such...); however, i can't seem to find anything further on what happened with those or if there was any success in breeding in captivity or general acclimation to captivity....

i have to go with chuck on the "#1 on the wish list".... lol...so, guys and gals, how do we make that happen? ;) ;) ;)
 

eisentrauti

Avid Member
I doubt that there's anything left. There are some "projects" with failed massively in the US, eg what happened with Langerwerfs thamnobates clutches or with the TONS of parsoniis...
There are still ways to get them in the US, but not legally
 
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