Terrible Gas Prolapse (waiting at Vet ER now)

ASobbleMom

Member
@MissSkittles is absolutely right...that type of surgery can't wait. If the tissue dries out it will become necrotic/die and I'm not sure what they will be able to do then.

K-Y jelly is the best lubricant to keep the tissue moist until the surgery is over.

He needs to be put under to do the surgery because it's painful. Usually a purse string suture is needed to keep things from popping out again after it's been put back.

I'm not a vet so I can't tell you if there is areas in for neutering him at the same time or not.

I would give him softer food for a while after the surgery too so it is easier to pass.

What supplements are you using and how often for each. Please be specific...especially about the calcium, phos, D3 and form of vitamin A.

Has he ever had MBD?
He has not. I adopted a tegu many years ago who did have it, so I know a bit about it, but Ryan has always had a 6% uvb (juuuuust now about 6 months old), calcium supplementation with arcadia and repashy and (sorry I just put all this in his new vet file and typing this as my bf drives us to Ryan's appt), so I don't think it's that, he has always been very strapping and active.
 

ASobbleMom

Member
That's a very bad prolapse. I doubt your watering the plants scared that out of him. It is lucky you saw it happen. Your getting him in there fast was very smart. That isn't something you can fix at home. The sugar water and KY are good first aid to do while you get an appointment.

The cost is probably based on the emergency fee, the amount of anesthesia (prices on that have gone up) by length of the surgery, the surgeons and assistants time and after care, injections etc. Prices used to be less to treat exotics and rodents but it isn't an affordable way to do business as they take up the same or more supplies and time to treat as standard pets.
I know, everyone I talk to has never seen such a thing and it could be from so many causes, or barely a cause at all.
 

ASobbleMom

Member
Thank you, EVERYONE for being so kind and supportive. It truly means so much to me.

Ryan and I were referred specifically to a bird and small animal vet in Connecticut...they do hawks and have a reptile surgeon and all kinds of weird things! So I remain hopeful. Ryan is still hanging in there, slightly worse for wear, he is def insanely dehydrated despite me misting him and the prolapse consistently, but he was drinking willingly and a lot around 10:45 this morning. this time, I brought ANOTHER spray bottle, a nice pothos if he is thirsty, and I did get a really weird mucousy poop. Like super clumpy and white and goopy, so bringing that, in addition to my stuff from last night. He was basking, soni turned off the heat lamp and led plant light (the ballast gets super hot) and left on uvb so the Prolapse doesn't dry out, this morning. He was climbing, basking, and drinking, but comparatively looks awful, but we are almost there.

As a note, I will pay as much as I can and apply for care credit and work with the vet whatever, I do want to mention I googled some answers and there are grants out there, go fund me, crowdfunding and even programs by US State. I hope not to need these, but good to know there is a sliver of hope when it gets really bad.

Wish us luck! I love my Ryan so much and it's been such a harrowing situation!
 

bbyoda

Chameleon Enthusiast
ME TOO. At least for the most sensitive or expensive to treat pets.

I can speak for nationwide. I used to have it on a cat but cancelled because it doesn't cover pre existing conditions and he was a senior cat with lots of issues. It works better for younger animals who don't have pre-existing conditions.

You pay a monthly premium per pet. You pay vet costs upfront. Then you submit the receipt for reimbursement. After you pay your deductible, like 90% of costs are paid. So it would really be worth the investment in this kind of scenario that you're going through.

Some others who have it shared their experience in this thread:
https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/insurance.178664/#post-1610932

I get it through my work but not sure how to get it if you're not a part of a company group. Maybe @Beman or @jannb have insight there.
 

ASobbleMom

Member
Thanks everyone! Well, so far, so good. The vet walked in, kinda slumped against the wall and said, WHEW, WHAT A PROLAPSE! I was terrified until she said how good he looks otherwise (he was drinking off the plant I brought with us this afternoon) and said she wouldn't offer me the option of surgery unless she really though he had a good chance, which he does. I am really proud that I acted fast and have done everything I can to help him. She said they have had a few chameleons in Today, but normally, in general, they never look as good as Ryan. So he is in for surgery as we speak! It's definitely rectal/colon tissue but it's alive so first she will anesthesize him and try to stick it back in, but may need to cut the external part off and re-sew the inside part to the vent.

We DO now think we know what caused this, and yes, it's my fault: I think I fed him too late one day and early/regular the next and he did not eat all his food the first, late day. Then he gorged, without me knowing there was food leftover (I glance, but obviously not well enough), and ate his regular ration. So, I will commit to being insanely more diligent about feeding times, amount fed, and checking to make sure there isn't easy prey left in a dish/feeder/flat branch I have in there.

I am doing everything I can to make this right. The vet will have to stay late tonight, he will be there over the weekend for pickup Monday if all goes well, and the High estimate was $1,834. Which is like, Hallelujah compared to 3-5k. They had me pay half, which was more generous than I could ask. They brought him out so I could tell him I love him and say see you soon (which I am sure he hated)

I know there are very real risks of him dying under anesthesia, and that the internal stitches could burst and make him septic, and this prolapse could happen again. However, knowing I am doing all I can for my little buddy...there is no price you can put on that. I am very happy with everything so far. I also grabbed a bunch of pamphlets on pet health insurance!!! Let it be known I have 4 kids, a horse, a pony, 3 goats, 12 chickens, 12 turkeys (Anyone want some turkeys? PLEASE take some), four cats, a corn snake and of course Ryan. I haven't had a big vet bill in a loooong time, but it may be worth insuring say, the horse, Ryan and maybe the older or more mischievous of the cats.

They requested I bring him silkworms up tomorrow morning and said only soft foods for a while!!! Hoping he pulls through surgery and he is ok!
 

jannb

Chameleon Enthusiast
I have used Nationwide for pet insurance for many years. It’s cheap, and pays very well. I get the best that they have, Whole Pet plus Wellness and it runs around $180.00 a year for a chameleon. It has a $50.00 yearly deductible and after you meet the deductible it pays 90% of everything. Surgery, all illnesses, checkups and fecals. There is no limit on coverage. I highly recommend Nationwide. You can not get an exotic quote online, you have to call them.
 

Lindasjackson

Chameleon Enthusiast
I have used Nationwide for pet insurance for many years. It’s cheap, and pays very well. I get the best that they have, Whole Pet plus Wellness and it runs around $180.00 a year for a chameleon. It has a $50.00 yearly deductible and after you meet the deductible it pays 90% of everything. Surgery, all illnesses, checkups and fecals. There is no limit on coverage. I highly recommend Nationwide. You can not get an exotic quote online, you have to call them.
Thanks for the info! I’m thinking about it and I’m sure others will to.
Thanks everyone! Well, so far, so good. The vet walked in, kinda slumped against the wall and said, WHEW, WHAT A PROLAPSE! I was terrified until she said how good he looks otherwise (he was drinking off the plant I brought with us this afternoon) and said she wouldn't offer me the option of surgery unless she really though he had a good chance, which he does. I am really proud that I acted fast and have done everything I can to help him. She said they have had a few chameleons in Today, but normally, in general, they never look as good as Ryan. So he is in for surgery as we speak! It's definitely rectal/colon tissue but it's alive so first she will anesthesize him and try to stick it back in, but may need to cut the external part off and re-sew the inside part to the vent.

We DO now think we know what caused this, and yes, it's my fault: I think I fed him too late one day and early/regular the next and he did not eat all his food the first, late day. Then he gorged, without me knowing there was food leftover (I glance, but obviously not well enough), and ate his regular ration. So, I will commit to being insanely more diligent about feeding times, amount fed, and checking to make sure there isn't easy prey left in a dish/feeder/flat branch I have in there.

I am doing everything I can to make this right. The vet will have to stay late tonight, he will be there over the weekend for pickup Monday if all goes well, and the High estimate was $1,834. Which is like, Hallelujah compared to 3-5k. They had me pay half, which was more generous than I could ask. They brought him out so I could tell him I love him and say see you soon (which I am sure he hated)

I know there are very real risks of him dying under anesthesia, and that the internal stitches could burst and make him septic, and this prolapse could happen again. However, knowing I am doing all I can for my little buddy...there is no price you can put on that. I am very happy with everything so far. I also grabbed a bunch of pamphlets on pet health insurance!!! Let it be known I have 4 kids, a horse, a pony, 3 goats, 12 chickens, 12 turkeys (Anyone want some turkeys? PLEASE take some), four cats, a corn snake and of course Ryan. I haven't had a big vet bill in a loooong time, but it may be worth insuring say, the horse, Ryan and maybe the older or more mischievous of the cats.

They requested I bring him silkworms up tomorrow morning and said only soft foods for a while!!! Hoping he pulls through surgery and he is ok!
Praying for Ryan and I hope he does great!
 

bbyoda

Chameleon Enthusiast
Yay for Ryan!!! You did so right by him and the surgery price is way more reasonable than originally thought. I'm so happy for you and hoping he pulls through surgery without any issues.

This thread was a wakeup call for me and I just signed up all of my pets for the pet protection plan through Nationwide that my employer underwrites. It covers sickness, surgeries, and injuries, not prevention like @jannb has (her plan sounds amazing)! You can get whatever plan works best for you.

I spoke with Jerry at 18777387874 extension 6327 and he said he'd be happy to talk to anyone else here who wants to learn more about their plans.
 

Sonny13

Chameleon Enthusiast
Where are you located? I'll come!
Well it’s a pretty journey across the ocean, however a ticket and the vet bill will be less then numbers you named. And of course we got a free spare room to stay and a deluxe apartment for Ryan.

Big thumbs up for handeling your situation and your dedication 👏🏻
 

dinomom

Chameleon Enthusiast
That's a very bad prolapse. I doubt your watering the plants scared that out of him. It is lucky you saw it happen. Your getting him in there fast was very smart. That isn't something you can fix at home. The sugar water and KY are good first aid to do while you get an appointment.

The cost is probably based on the emergency fee, the amount of anesthesia (prices on that have gone up) by length of the surgery, the surgeons and assistants time and after care, injections etc. Prices used to be less to treat exotics and rodents but it isn't an affordable way to do business as they take up the same or more supplies and time to treat as standard pets.
Not to mention that microsurgical tools and supplies cost more than those for bigger animals-such as fine tissue forceps for $500 and ocular suture @ $100-$250 per pack and it takes 2. Instruments are autoclaved and re-used of course but if there are 20 instruments in the surgical pack you can see the type of investment it takes to equip the practice.
 
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