Temporal gland infection

Alycia

Member
I'm in need of advise on temporal gland d infection in on of my Jackson's chameleons. I have a vet appointment tomorrow but I'm unsure of his competence with reptiles (new vet)
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
I'm in need of advise on temporal gland d infection in on of my Jackson's chameleons. I have a vet appointment tomorrow but I'm unsure of his competence with reptiles (new vet)
Did you call and ask the vet’s office if they have experience with Jackson’s chams? Could you fill out the ask for help form in my signature below, please?
 

Alycia

Member
She's in a large reptibreeze enclosure. Linear t8 high output uvb. Basking are stays in low 80s. Humidity during day is 30% and 70-80% at night misting twice a day in early morning and evening. Humidifiers come on around 1am and run until around 6am. She gets reptical no d3 every feeding and reptivite once a month.
The vets office said they treat Jackson's but on the other hand the receptionist had to go ask if they treated so I'm afraid they may not have adequate experywith them. There are no other vets in my area that even say they treat reptiles
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
She's in a large reptibreeze enclosure. Linear t8 high output uvb. Basking are stays in low 80s. Humidity during day is 30% and 70-80% at night misting twice a day in early morning and evening. Humidifiers come on around 1am and run until around 6am. She gets reptical no d3 every feeding and reptivite once a month.
The vets office said they treat Jackson's but on the other hand the receptionist had to go ask if they treated so I'm afraid they may not have adequate experywith them. There are no other vets in my area that even say they treat reptiles
Sorry, I read that wrong, so they don’t have cham experience? It’s at least a start and with help from the vet and here, hopefully your cham will get the proper treatment
 

Alycia

Member
I already no the main cause if temporal gland infection but myself and several others can't figure out what's caused it in this case as it's usually husbandry related and temps and humidity are in range. I also know I need foraz for antibiotics but being a more rural vet clinic I'm afraid they won't have it. I'm trying to find out if there's anything else I can do to help her. I have 5 Jackson's she's the only one having issues and all are kept the same.
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
I already no the main cause if temporal gland infection but myself and several others can't figure out what's caused it in this case as it's usually husbandry related and temps and humidity are in range. I also know I need foraz for antibiotics but being a more rural vet clinic I'm afraid they won't have it. I'm trying to find out if there's anything else I can do to help her. I have 5 Jackson's she's the only one having issues and all are kept the same.
You can always call and ask if they have foraz. Why are you so defensive about filling out the form? If your husbandry is correct, there shouldn’t be any issues towards filling it out. You can also take your filled out form to the vet with you so they can see your husbandry quick and easy
 

Alycia

Member
Because temporal gland which is not associated with location (which is extremely low traffic area and Alabama for area, artificial plants.) Oh and feeders are dubia, crickets and super worms gutloaded with fresh veggies, fed every other day. Temporal glad is associated with humidy and temps generally. Even if I get the antibiotics and treat the temporal infection if I can't figure out why it's showing up with all of that being In correct ranges it won't do any good to treat it.
 

Alycia

Member
I'm not trying to be rude but what I'm asking about is something that typically only people that are experienced in tricerous species of chameleons can generally help with. This gland is not found in all chameleons. There's also not a lot of information to be found on it. I'm needing someone who has dealt with it and knows what else can be used to aid in treatment. Others than antibiotics, manuka honey and bee pollen is there anything else that I should try.
 

JacksJill

Chameleon Enthusiast
The only over the counter treatment I have heard used with TGI is Miruga Honey applied topically to the affected gland. This is in addition to antibiotic therapy and not a complete treatment. It can draw out the infection and help dry up the area. It has some antibiotic properties as well. Health food stores carry it. I have never dealt with it (knock wood) this is just from my reading on the subject. If your vet doesn't carry the antibiotic there are compounding pharmacies that dilute drugs for use in small animals that can overnight it to you if your vet calls them with the prescription.
 

Alycia

Member
The only over the counter treatment I have heard used with TGI is Miruga Honey applied topically to the affected gland. This is in addition to antibiotic therapy and not a complete treatment. It can draw out the infection and help dry up the area. It has some antibiotic properties as well. Health food stores carry it. I have never dealt with it (knock wood) this is just from my reading on the subject. If your vet doesn't carry the antibiotic there are compounding pharmacies that dilute drugs for use in small animals that can overnight it to you if your vet calls them with the prescription.
Thank you would the bee pollen help any
The only over the counter treatment I have heard used with TGI is Miruga Honey applied topically to the affected gland. This is in addition to antibiotic therapy and not a complete treatment. It can draw out the infection and help dry up the area. It has some antibiotic properties as well. Health food stores carry it. I have never dealt with it (knock wood) this is just from my reading on the subject. If your vet doesn't carry the antibiotic there are compounding pharmacies that dilute drugs for use in small animals that can overnight it to you if your vet calls them with the prescription.
Thank you I've trying to find someone who actually had a clue about it. This has not been easy. Will the bee pollen also help
 

JacksJill

Chameleon Enthusiast
I feed bee pollen dusted on feeders as part of my supplement schedule but other than as additional nutritional support I don't know what it would do for your problem.
I have lowered my daytime humidity levels and raised my nighttime humidity closer to 90% with an ultrasonic cool mist humidifier. It is theorized that high heat combined with humidity may be creating an environment that encourages TG infections. You can look up threads on naturalistic humidity like this one. https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/new-humidifier-to-test-the-naturalistic-approach.165524/ or check out this pod cast https://www.chameleonbreeder.com/podcast/ep-89-naturalistic-hydration-for-chameleons/
One other treatment that might help is silvadene ointment but it is more of a wound care thing. The honey will probably be better because of it's ability to draw out infection.
 

JacksJill

Chameleon Enthusiast
I have heard that larger feeders can damage/ scratch the gland area and let in infection. I don't think any specific bacteria is to blame but it's more of an opportunistic infection of whatever is already there. I will see what else I can find for you.
 

Alycia

Member
I've made some adjustments to humidity already. One place I was getting feeders smelled like death one day so I've refused to buy from them. I was sick and my boyfriend went and got feeders for me and it was from this place .maybe a week later the infection took place so I was curious on it
 

Alycia

Member
I submitted request to join that group
I've talked to elies and Petr necas about it lol. Seems like the circle is actually very small
 
Top Bottom