released some superworms

vasol

New Member
so i had a container of superworms for awhile since my cham is too small to eat them. they kept chewing through the lid and escaping so i decided to release them in my garden, are they gona go crazy and eat everything LOL
 

jojackson

New Member
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"Eh He He He, Oh My Word Yes, They're Gonna eat Your neighbour lawns to Dirt, possibly becoming a plague which may starve and become attracted to human flesh and go on a feeding frenzy consuming everything in their path!"
Dr-Hibbert.jpg

"Eh He He he!" :D
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:) NO!
 
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Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
so i had a container of superworms for awhile since my cham is too small to eat them. they kept chewing through the lid and escaping so i decided to release them in my garden, are they gona go crazy and eat everything LOL

Get your flack jacket on...releasing any non-native animal to your yard is irresponsible! You could unintentionally create or establish a population of pest insects, poison soil organisms, injure naturally occurring beneficial insects, attract birds to a place where they are endangered by other risks (like free roaming cats).

Maybe the chances of any of these events happening because of YOUR particular superworms is remote, but the point is...dumping something alien in your yard because it is inconvenient for you is a terrible idea! Why do you think we now have unwanted exotic plants and animals roaming this country? (bullfrogs, pythons, weeds, agricultural pest insects, plant diseases, chytrid fungus, parasites, bacteria, rats, mice, feral cats, dogs, starlings, who knows what else) Because of ditching unwanted animals without a thought for the consequences.

The next time you have something live and exotic you don't want, think twice.
 

pssh

Avid Member
If it's a bug, throw them in the freezer or you can make a quick buck and sell them. Problem solved.
 

jojackson

New Member
Great Thinking Kara, I use frozen ones for feeding my turtles and fish (after thawing).
Good safe 'environmentally friendly' method of disposal.
That said, Im sure it's more likely they very quickly became wildlife meals than wildlife pests, but Carlton is right, try not to do that if you can. :)
 

Picasso123

New Member
Darkling beetles eat both fresh and decaying vegetation. Major predators include birds, rodents, sunspiders, and lizards.
 

Elizadolots

New Member
What sense of humor? I'm serious. I tossed some supers out the front door and my daughter and I were afraid to go outside for a week....
 

vasol

New Member
interesting, yea i thought about the whole introducing a new species to my backyard thing, but i figured 20-30 worms wouldnt hurt. i just hope they dont eat my dads crops...as hes getting ready to plant stuff since its springtime
 
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