NEED ASSISTANCE/ADVICE - VERY UPSET

CC's Baby

Avid Member
So hello everyone. I am soooo very sad that this is occuring but we have figured out that I am allergic to what we believe to be the feeders dusting (calcium, etc......) . i have been very ill ever since I got Angus and we have tracked it back to this as of now but I am so ill, i continue to have respiratory illnesses requiring antiobiotics, medicines, and missing work, so it is affecting my job very badly as well. i am very upset and saddened by this because I love my little Angus, but I am not sure if the alternatives to liquid drops, etc.... are good for him much less the trouble and expense it may cost in order to keep him. I am curious if anyone else has had this happen to them where they are allergic and made adjustments (affordable and healthy adjustments not only for them but for your cham) that worked for them? I may be forced to have to find him a new home. He is only 5 months old and one of @Matt Vanilla Gorilla 's babies and he is PERFECT! I am very upset and saddened by this but it is important that I do what is best for not only me but for Angus. If anyone lives in Texas or close by and would be interested in him, please let me know. Looking for options??????
s
 

Syreptyon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Agh, that's terrible, I'm sorry to hear! I have never heard of anyone being allergic to the supplements, but who knows.

My first thought, however, is crickets. Are crickets a large part of your cham's diet? A lot of reptile owners develop a cricket allergy from repeated contact with the dirty b*stards. About 6 months ago I started to develop a rash on every joint in my body every time I got too close and inhaled cricket detritus-infected air. I'm asking this, hopeful that it could be the case for you too, because you can get around this problem with the use of gloves or disposable face masks to prevent the antigens from getting in your body. Fingers crossed this may be the case for you as well
 

Zilla23

Established Member
this is odd, most of the supplement particles are actually too large to cause inhalation allergy/respiratory issues. I have heard that some individuals have respiratory issues with the crickets (no idea why) but this is usually alleviated with vigilant cleaning where you keep them, I have two keepers and I swap the crickets back and forth every three days or so to keep everything clean, mainly because they stink if you don't. Have you had a physician actually link the supplements to your issue? are you sure you aren't just having an upper respiratory infection and it is just a coincidence that is coincides with having your cham? Could it be something else you changed in your environment? Seasonal?
 

CC's Baby

Avid Member
Agh, that's terrible, I'm sorry to hear! I have never heard of anyone being allergic to the supplements, but who knows.

My first thought, however, is crickets. Are crickets a large part of your cham's diet? A lot of reptile owners develop a cricket allergy from repeated contact with the dirty b*stards. About 6 months ago I started to develop a rash on every joint in my body every time I got too close and inhaled cricket detritus-infected air. I'm asking this, hopeful that it could be the case for you too, because you can get around this problem with the use of gloves or disposable face masks to prevent the antigens from getting in your body. Fingers crossed this may be the case for you as well
Yes, crickets are his favorite staple food. the roaches were bothering me and I heard they carry bad allergens for people, so I am almost out of them anyway and he has decided they are not fun enough to eat anymore anyway. He loves superworms too. I am so beside myself, but you have to understand. I am allergic to everything HIGHLY allergic , been tested several times, and I am even allergic to latex and Poinsettias plants. How unfare is that? Poinsettias have a latex protein in their stems, so I cannot breathe around them and get very ill. Never thought this would be an issue, but I am certain that it is. Will try some things first and see, but I am so sick right now, I have missed almost this entire week of work. I cannot afford to stay sick to keep him either.
 

CC's Baby

Avid Member
this is odd, most of the supplement particles are actually too large to cause inhalation allergy/respiratory issues. I have heard that some individuals have respiratory issues with the crickets (no idea why) but this is usually alleviated with vigilant cleaning where you keep them, I have two keepers and I swap the crickets back and forth every three days or so to keep everything clean, mainly because they stink if you don't. Have you had a physician actually link the supplements to your issue? are you sure you aren't just having an upper respiratory infection and it is just a coincidence that is coincides with having your cham? Could it be something else you changed in your environment? Seasonal?
Well, I keep the containers spotless DAILY on the crickets so there are no smells. I just know how I feel when I am around them too because I am so allergy prone. I am 98% certain but it may be the crickets themselves. Not sure. That is why I posted, looking for alternatives
 

alphakenc

Chameleon Enthusiast
If Angus likes cricket (fast moving) you might want to try red runner ( way much cleaner n fast moving )
Screenshot_2019-03-22-13-01-49-1.png


And you might need more
Screenshot_2019-03-22-13-04-48-1.png

Which I think you probably already have.
 

alphakenc

Chameleon Enthusiast
Adult females are dark brown to black, with cream-colored markings on the shield and a cream-colored stripe edging its wings; they are broader than males, and have short vestigial wings.males are more commonly encountered than females, due to their ability to fly and an attraction to lights.
But all u need is the young nymphs(like the pic) not the adult.
 

JacksJill

Chameleon Enthusiast
I'm assuming you already have an allergist if you don't and you have decent insurance get one. Allergy injections have changed my life. I ride horses and while I'm not allergic to them I am allergic to everything they eat or live in (hay and straw) and the great outdoors as well. I made many a mud pie as a child and it didn't save me either.

Try switching to silkworms as your primary feeder they are pricey and you will probably have to hatch out your own to make it work but they stack up pretty well nutritionally.
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
Silkworms are a good idea for a staple as well.

I've heard locally sourced honey helps allergies, though I have no clue. Especially with this intensity, I'd imagine most natural remedies wouldn't do much.
 

snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
Sorry to hear about your troubles, I'm sure its very upsetting (and its a real bummer to feel sick all the time). As others have said, if you want to try to stick it out for another month or two, you could try other feeders. It may take a month or two for your symptoms to subside even after making a change.

I just got some silkworms from @Spyro88 as well as eggs. They are more difficult to source and raise than crickets or dubias, but less likely to cause a reaction. My guys LOVE BSFL (black soldier fly larva aka Phoenix Worms). I feed them the larva and put some in their enclosures to turn to flies. I don't think BSFL will cut it as a staple (although they are quite healthy), but would be worth a shot adding to some other feeders. Isopods could be a possibility, as well.

Maybe give silkies, BSFL, superworms and hornworms a try (supers and hornworms less frequently than the others). And if/when you add crickets to the mix, wear a face mask/gloves to cut down exposure. Since you're in Texas maybe you can store your crickets outside in a shed or something, during the milder months.
 
Sorry to hear about your troubles, I'm sure its very upsetting (and its a real bummer to feel sick all the time). As others have said, if you want to try to stick it out for another month or two, you could try other feeders. It may take a month or two for your symptoms to subside even after making a change.

I just got some silkworms from @Spyro88 as well as eggs. They are more difficult to source and raise than crickets or dubias, but less likely to cause a reaction. My guys LOVE BSFL (black soldier fly larva aka Phoenix Worms). I feed them the larva and put some in their enclosures to turn to flies. I don't think BSFL will cut it as a staple (although they are quite healthy), but would be worth a shot adding to some other feeders. Isopods could be a possibility, as well.

Maybe give silkies, BSFL, superworms and hornworms a try (supers and hornworms less frequently than the others). And if/when you add crickets to the mix, wear a face mask/gloves to cut down exposure. Since you're in Texas maybe you can store your crickets outside in a shed or something, during the milder months.
Haha, those are the feeders I recommended this morning when poor @CC's Baby contacted me in tears about the situation (silk worms, superworms, hornworms black soldier fly larvae). I also thaught that a big food allergy is sea food. A lot of/most of our calcium supliments comes from the exo and end skeletons of sea creatures such as oyster shells. If you @CC's Baby are allergic to sea food you might have to try liquid suplimentation. Liquid calcium such as calcium glubionate is used by veterinarians and experts chameleon keepers to rescue chameleons with metabolic bone disease.

Would be so wonderful if we can help solve this problem! Thank you so much to everyone for adding your suggestions!
 
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