MINIMUM time to gutload crickets or "sanitize" them

Discussion in 'Chameleon Food' started by Franquixote, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. Franquixote

    Franquixote Member

    Hoping one of our experts can offer some thoughts on the minimum amount of time it takes to make a significant difference and MORE IMPORTANTLY if anyone has some fact-based data or info on the amount of time it takes to rid crickets of other things such as parasites.
    Hear me out on this, I know that in many species of animals used for human consumption that proper care and feeding results in significantly reduced parasite/pathogen loads. For example, finishing cows on grass will allow them to shed more than 75% (I've heard as much as 90% +) of dangerous strains of E. coli. Another example is escargot, where a week of clean feed accomplishes similar results.

    While I am trying to establish a routine it has been necessary for me to purchase crickets from a local pet shop- not a big box store, but I don't know the source of his feeders. I do not want a cricket colony in the house, but need some for now until other feeder colonies are established.

    Please point me to any data if possible rather than just anecdotes, but I welcome opinions as well.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Andee

    Andee Chameleon Enthusiast

    Feeders cannot be rid of the parasites you want to rid them of. Because it's intestinal worms. Not bacterium like e. coli. Escargot are not rid of most parasites that we worry about them carrying, like lung worms etc, by purging their stomachs. Their stomachs are purged so that they taste better and it rid their stomachs of stuff like e. coli. Which e. coli though it is nasty is nothing like a parasite. It's a bacteria that destroys your ability to digest food well and therefore you get something that ruins your ability to absorb nutrients well and also something that screws with your hydration levels etc. And e.coli can be survived with minor issues by healthy adults, it sick, young children, and the elderly who are at most risk for it, even from the nastier strains. Most healthy adults only need some supportive care to survive nastier strains and their systems will naturally flush it out with the correct supportive treatment. It's blown far out of proportion.

    Now how we humans don't get parasites from snails etc, is we cook our food, if it's game meat etc and doesn't have to be alive before cooking we freeze it for 3 weeks and -15 at least I think?
     
    jamest0o0 likes this.
  3. jamest0o0

    jamest0o0 Chameleon Enthusiast

    In this hobby you'll find, there simply not data like this around. Sure you find small things here and there but IMO the little amounts of research don't stand much ground compared to the keepers words who have done this for years and years. I think people put too much faith in research that is minor at best
     
    Scottsquatch, Sloppysponge and Andee like this.
  4. jamest0o0

    jamest0o0 Chameleon Enthusiast

    And what andee said 100% you're not going to purge crickets from parasites and aflatoxins
     
    Sloppysponge likes this.
  5. jamest0o0

    jamest0o0 Chameleon Enthusiast

    Btw I'm not saying a well researched topic isn't worthwhile, but a lot of studies, especially in this hobby, are done with small groups. There are so many variables into play, it's more of a headache to worry about it all that much. Just happily average out what the best keepers have been doing and I'm sure you'll find success.
     
    Scottsquatch, Sloppysponge and Andee like this.
  6. Franquixote

    Franquixote Member

    I get what you are saying, and also appreciate that you remind me I sometimes overthink these kinds of things : )

    Just out of curiosity though, I wonder if there is anything akin to a dewormer that'd be useful.

    For my aquariums I use Panacur-C (the generic is fenbendazole) which kills planaria and worms but doesn't bother the snails, inverts like shrimp, or even scaleless fish like freshwater puffers, catfish, etc.

    No idea if reptiles tolerate it but I'm going to look into it.

    EDIT:

    Looks like the chameleons tolerate fenbendazole and it's very cheap- maybe I will run some tests on crickets to see how well they tolerate it.

    https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/fenbendazole-safe-guard.124560/
     
  7. Franquixote

    Franquixote Member

    Looks like a good book on the subject:


    Understanding Reptile Parasites: A Basic Manual for Herpetoculturists & Veterinarians

    Roger Klingenberg
     
  8. jamest0o0

    jamest0o0 Chameleon Enthusiast

    My understanding is that medications are harsh on chameleons and only to be used as needed. I'm not experienced in that aspect though, my chams have yet to be needing treatment for anything.
     
    Sloppysponge likes this.
  9. jamest0o0

    jamest0o0 Chameleon Enthusiast

    What i would do is listen to everything you can on the chameleon breeder podcast, there's a couple books I have as well just for resources.
     
    Sloppysponge likes this.
  10. Andee

    Andee Chameleon Enthusiast

    There's no reason to do a deworming unless the fecal comes with a heavy parasite load. Killing parasites in general can be dangerous for chameleons and they aren't always bothered by parasites unless they have a different health issue going on. The thing with offering crickets loaded with parasites is that the amount a pet store cricket carries in my opinion often shows whatever that single cricket carries shows it is a bad feeder in general and could make your chameleon sick. And if you cham is generally stressed which can happen more than you'd expect in captivity as well as the wild the parasite load they naturally carry can bloom out of control
     
    Scottsquatch and jamest0o0 like this.
  11. Scottsquatch

    Scottsquatch Avid Member

    Your gonna give yourself an ulcer dude! LOL! Why not check around for local reptile clubs and see if anybody raises crickets?Maybe they could sell you some until your roaches get rolling? That way you won't have to worry about parasites.
     
    jamest0o0 likes this.
  12. jamest0o0

    jamest0o0 Chameleon Enthusiast

Share This Page



Loading...