Jackson’s outside for the night

Kracker

Member
I have a Jackson’s, we live in western pa and it’s 78 today almost 90 in the sun but will drop to 51 tonight! Any thoughts on this being to much of a drop. Or is a 6 month old equipped for low almost 50 degrees through night? Oh it’s abought 40% humidity and I plan on watching him till morning humidity starts to rise.
 

Kracker

Member
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nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
id be worried when the temp gets over 75. 50 or even upper 40's is fine at night. They do not like it above 75...
 

Kracker

Member
Actual temp was 78. But direct sunlight made it quite a bit hotter and he kept pressing for the direct sun and I aided him (shame😔on me)! But I kept him well hydrated with regular showers. But abought the topic at hand, u really feel that 50 degrees is within safe range? Apologies this is my first summer with the Little feller.
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
Data from wild Jackson’s chameleons in Hawaii (T. j. xantholophus) shows that they prefer areas with daytime temperatures between 61-81°F (16-27°C) and nighttime temps between 39-64°F (4-18°C). (Preliminary Study of the Behavior and Ecology of Jackson’s Chameleon of Maui, Hawaii) However, this data can only be applied to wild-caught T. j. xantholophus and their descendants, and should not be applied to the other two subspecies.

As pets, Jackson’s chameleon keepers have noticed that they get the best results with the following temperature gradient:

  • Basking area (hot spot) — 83°F (28°C)
  • Shade temperature — 68-72°F (20-23°C)
  • Nighttime temps — 50-59°F (15°C)
Temperatures are sourced from Dr. Frances Baines’ UV Tool, adjusted according to observations from Bill Strand and Petr Necas.

Note that T. j. merumontanus prefers cooler temperatures than the other two, with a basking temperature around 79°F (26°C), shade temperatures of 64-68°F (18-22°C), and a nighttime drop preferably under 59°F (15°C).
 

Kracker

Member
Thank you very much, see I’m at odds because he was a pet show buy and seller wasn’t available at time of purchase. I know better but also know reptiles well enough to pick a healthy animal. However I have no clue if he’s mt. meru or of Hawaiian decent and there are some major temp differences in the two populations. His love of heat makes me think Hawaii but his perfect horns and colors makes me think Kenya. Either way I pay attention to what he wants as well as needs and adapt the two best I can.
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
Kinyonga knows that Kaizen and I both have a strong interest and a good bit of experience with this species and I breed the jacksonii jacksonii subspecies. She was tagging us to help out. She is rather a queen here because she researches everything on chameleons and has brought every possible scientific article to this forum. She also tirelessly gives of her time to help others with chameleon problems. She was keeping chameleons way way way before it became mainstream, a true pioneer. She is a fantastic person to have in your corner.

I can't tell from your picture what subspecies you have. I would need something closer without screen that shows the spines along the back and if possible the tail base area. The odds are that you have either a male yellow crested probably Hawaiian origin or have a Mount Kenya jacksonii jacksonii. The Mount Meru have not been available in the US for quite some time and if any one has them they have kept them hidden.

I keep a few of mine outdoors in California. I leave them out down to 50 F. I don't have the daytime heat and humidity you may have this summer. I keep them in mostly shade during the heat of the day. They come originally from an elevation of cooler temperatures and seek heat out of necessity there. I believe this leads them to seek more heat than they need in captivity and this could shorten their life. I keep yellow crested and jack jacks in the same temperature range and try not to let the basking area go above 82 F.
 

Kracker

Member
Last night went well but I caved in at about 53 degrees. It was still dropping in temp at 2am and I needed sleep so he spent the night in front doorway with screen door shut at abought 55-56 degrees. that’s almost ten degrees colder than I’ve managed indoors so far but I’m working on an extra air conditioned space for him at night. But it’s hard when most rooms are occupied by beings that don’t like it below 68 let alone below 60 LOL. But I’ll make it happen before outside night temps get to high for summer.
 

Kracker

Member
I didn't see your picture post until later. He's quite handsome.
Thank you he was a rescue from a reptile show I couldn’t bare watching him b handled over n over again he looked miserable and I had everything to care for him so, I just scooped him up and couldn’t b happier now that the adjustment Period is over and he is not petrified of everything anymore!
 
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