Grasshoppers

Boricua

New Member
does anyone knows where to go find a vendor of live grasshoppers? I’m trying to find that out online but can’t find a legit one.
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Grasshopper are known as a pest, and I believe can only transfer hands if you both live and do the transaction in the same state. You can catch your own, just make sure it's out in a rural place so there's no pesticides on them or anything
 
No interstate shipping allowed so no market viability for it in USA, seems common in Europe, though. You could learn how to breed them but given how many I see in the summer, likely easier just to go out and catch a bunch. I've read there is one toxic species in USA, though. I feed some I catch in my organic garden. I have a pretty small garden so I only catch 2 or 3 at a time, but if you went into a big batch of weeds when it is warm, I imagine you'd catch a lot of them. Sometimes they are out thick.
 

Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
No interstate shipping allowed so no market viability for it in USA, seems common in Europe, though. You could learn how to breed them but given how many I see in the summer, likely easier just to go out and catch a bunch. I've read there is one toxic species in USA, though. I feed some I catch in my organic garden. I have a pretty small garden so I only catch 2 or 3 at a time, but if you went into a big batch of weeds when it is warm, I imagine you'd catch a lot of them. Sometimes they are out thick.
It’s the Lubbers that are toxic, all others are safe.
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Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
It’s too late this year but the easiest thing to do is get you a good headlamp and find an overgrown field or wood line and walk them at night. Look in the grass and all the way up to about 6ft above ground or about as high as you can reach. The headlamp makes them freeze just like deer in headlights. They won’t try to run, it’s almost unfair how easy it is. I never pay for feeders during the summer because they are so plentiful around here. We also catch a lot of moths and praying mantises too.
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Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
Please read this whole post!

Every animal has parasites in/on them right now, including you! It’s just a question of what kind and how much.

My chams are fed an almost exclusively wild caught diet all summer, not a parisite yet. Thing is, that doesn’t mean it’s right for you too.

I live in southeast Louisiana and catch them all myself from areas in the deep swamp, places only accessible by boat or ATV. I know there are zero pesticides there. Yes, my chams are definitely at higher risk of contracting parasites than a Cham fed captive feeders but I do it because I know their diet is FAR more nutritious than anything I could buy them. However there have been cases where parasites have been passed along through CB feeders as well.

I have a rigorous testing schedule for my chams, they are tested every 6mos. I am fortunate to have a Vet friend who does them all for free in exchange for some WC feeders for her reptiles as well.

I save ALOT of money by not paying for feeders or breeding them. But I’m sure a day will come when one is contracted, when that day comes I will suck it up and pay whatever it takes to get them back in tip top shape. Anything else would be unacceptable, they are my responsibility.
 

Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
I think the worry of parasites from wild feeders is greatly overblown but is still a very valid concern. You are unlikely to have issues with parasites if your just catching a few here and there as treats.
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Horse hair worm right?
Some kind of parasite that I don't want my chameleons or other reptiles eating. I think that is what those worms are called. There are other nasty parasites you can find in wild caught insects that fit the same bill though. I recommend starting your own captive bred colonies to breed out parasites from your systems.

Best Regards
Jeremy A. Rich
 

Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
Some kind of parasite that I don't want my chameleons or other reptiles eating. I think that is what those worms are called. There are other nasty parasites you can find in wild caught insects that fit the same bill though. I recommend starting your own captive bred colonies to breed out parasites from your systems.

Best Regards
Jeremy A. Rich
That’s exactly what they are, chams can eat them all day long like spaghetti. But I do understand the point your trying to make, and I agree, there are risks involved in a wildcaught diet. While the big parasites make for a good shock video, they aren’t the scary ones, it’s the small ones you have to worry about.
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
That’s exactly what they are, chams can eat them all day long like spaghetti. But I do understand the point your trying to make, and I agree, there are risks involved in a wildcaught diet. While the big parasites make for a good shock video, they aren’t the scary ones, it’s the small ones you have to worry about.
I learned about agriculture plants and parasites and non native plants can be infected by native parasites. I rather not deal with that problem at all. The situation is similar to keepers who have never seen a wild caught dehydrated imported chameleons. They are most often infested with parasites and their prospects of living are not that great. The same thing goes for wild caught insects to be used as feeders. The way to forgo the prospects of all the terror of giving your chameleons a parasite load is to start captive bred colonies to breed out these parasites out of your systems. That is one way to improve everyone's sleep.

The picture of the Katydids and Hoppers is not that bad of a haul for an evening of collecting.

Best Regards
Jeremy A. Rich
 
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