Glass or screen cage

Chammy007

Member
Hello, some people seem to say go with screen, others say glass. Any opinions? What are the benefits of each?disadvantages?thanks much.chammy007
 

AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
Where do you live? What type of species are you housing? Glass can help keep humidity in and better control the climate. Screen allows total ventillation. I live in Colorado and If I had it to do again I would have gotten a solid side enclosure -- the all screen is a real pain to keep humidity in.
 

Chammy007

Member
Where do you live? What type of species are you housing? Glass can help keep humidity in and better control the climate. Screen allows total ventillation. I live in Colorado and If I had it to do again I would have gotten a solid side enclosure -- the all screen is a real pain to keep humidity in.
Hey thanks for the reply. I actually live in Montana. Haven’t decided what species I’ll be going with. Either a Veiled Cham or a Jacksons. I already ordered a screen cage from diycages.com. If need be I’ll return it and go with a glass habitat. Any suggestions on where to buy a glass enclosure?thanks again,chammy007
 

Tony_S

Chameleon Enthusiast
I went with glass. But it works with my local conditions.

What is your normal room temperature/humidity? What species are you thinking about getting?

Different species have different temperature/humidity requirements. If your room humidity is only 30% you are going to have a hard time maintaining 60-70% humidity in a screen enclosure.

so it would be better to go glass or get a species that requires a lower humidity.
 

AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
Should I decide on what species to go with first?chammy007
Yes. If you got a screen enclosure you can also block off the sides. I have bamboo curtains that are now blocking off the sides -- just some suggestions if you can't return it.

You definitely want to figure out which species you want before setting up the enclosure. Each one requires slightly to significantly different setups for their health.
 

Blustrgzr

Established Member
Should I decide on what species to go with first?chammy007
I'm new to the Cham world, but you'll get a lot of excellent advice here. I def. would suggest knowing what type you're getting in advance, and do all the research you can (Like you're doing now) so you're super prepared. I did a ton of research before I came to the forum, but not nearly as much as I thought once I started reading and asking here. I felt so much more prepared having found this group, and these forums, the amount of knowledge here is awesome. Good luck!
 
I have a screen cage . and i always have it between 60 and 70 humidity, and the top of cage is always 50 -60 . Get a good timer and a Good humidifer . I got a travel size one they are small and powerful. And under 20$.

Depending where you have him, you might need to cover one or two sides of cage. I have him in a tighter space so its always humid . i have a Jacksonii Jacksonnii
 

Chammy007

Member
I have a screen cage . and i always have it between 60 and 70 humidity, and the top of cage is always 50 -60 . Get a good timer and a Good humidifer . I got a travel size one they are small and powerful. And under 20$.

Depending where you have him, you might need to cover one or two sides of cage. I have him in a tighter space so its always humid . i have a Jacksonii Jacksonnii
As far as a timer goes, is it to simulate night and day?or for the humidifier?pardon my newbiness thanks much.chammy007
 

Connorology

Established Member
I prefer glass enclosures with vents for the reasons already described (humidity in my house is usually around 45% and keeping it up with a screen cage wasn't working very well). If you do go with a screen cage I would recommend an automated misting system as it will need to be misted very frequently to keep the humidity in acceptable range.

The big con to glass/solid side enclosures is cost/availability. An extra large glass Exo-Terra is around 250-400 dollars and is barely large enough for my Panther chameleon. It's also incredibly heavy with the plants in it and awkward to move.
 

Chammy007

Member
I’ve finally decided on which species I’ll be going with. If they still have it available I’ll be going with the flap neck cham linked below. Any idea what colors it changes from and to. I really like the yellow.

What should I do next?choose a cage? The cage I already ordered is a diycage.com 36x18x18 vertical screen. While researching here on chameleonforums.com I read that this was the minimum dimensions. Any help/opinions is greatly appreciated. thanks much.chammy007

https://reptmart.com/flap-neck-chameleon-chamaeleo-dilepis/
 
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Connorology

Established Member
For what it's worth I might reconsider the flap neck as your first chameleon. In my experience captive bred is one of the most important aspects to consider when selecting a reptile, and it'll be hard to find a CB flapneck (the link is for wild caught animals).

Wild caught animals, particularly imports like those linked, can have a number of health problems. Parasites, kidney damage from chronic dehydration, injuries, etc. They also might not adapt as well to living in a cage as their captive bred counterparts. Additionally, as species that are less commonly kept, the information available about their care is not as readily available as it would be for more common species. Husbandry info will be harder to come by, and your local exotics veterinarian is unlikely to have much (if any) experience with them should you need veterinary care.

Generally speaking, Panther chameleons and Veiled chameleons are considered to be the best first chameleons. They're also the most readily available as captive bred animals. Jacksons are maybe a close third, but they can be tough to get as CB as well because there are so many imports from feral populations in Florida. I am personally a big fan of Panther chameleons, but I think a Veiled could also be a good choice. Personally I would shy away from a Jackson's or an import of a rarer species.
 

CamoChameleonsHuman

Chameleon Enthusiast
For what it's worth I might reconsider the flap neck as your first chameleon. In my experience captive bred is one of the most important aspects to consider when selecting a reptile, and it'll be hard to find a CB flapneck (the link is for wild caught animals).

Wild caught animals, particularly imports like those linked, can have a number of health problems. Parasites, kidney damage from chronic dehydration, injuries, etc. They also might not adapt as well to living in a cage as their captive bred counterparts. Additionally, as species that are less commonly kept, the information available about their care is not as readily available as it would be for more common species. Husbandry info will be harder to come by, and your local exotics veterinarian is unlikely to have much (if any) experience with them should you need veterinary care.

Generally speaking, Panther chameleons and Veiled chameleons are considered to be the best first chameleons. They're also the most readily available as captive bred animals. Jacksons are maybe a close third, but they can be tough to get as CB as well because there are so many imports from feral populations in Florida. I am personally a big fan of Panther chameleons, but I think a Veiled could also be a good choice. Personally I would shy away from a Jackson's or an import of a rarer species.
Never having had chameleons before, I have found it’s challenging enough having captive bred veileds. Their needs are well within my abilities to provide for and I’m able to enjoy them rather than worrying over them. Start with a veiled or panther and work your way up to the more difficult to keep chams.
Agreed. @Chammy007 Get yourself a male veiled chameleon. If you want color get a male panther.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Regarding which type of enclosure you should get, glass or screen, take a look at one of the site sponsors, Dragonstrand. They make a clearside that is a little bit of both.
 

Chammy007

Member
Thanks much. I had my heart set on the flap neck. Although I consider myself to be a quick learner I respect your opinions. How about the panther below? I really like the color but the pic below isn’t of the actual Cham they’ll be shipping.They hatched in September and will be ready November /December, which gives me more than enough time to get my terrarium up and ready for the Cham. Until then I’ll still be searching for other options regarding which Cham to go with.
249330

https://chameleonsonly.com/collecti...alia-hatched-september-2019-ready-est-nov-dec
 

The Wild One

Chameleon Enthusiast
Panthers and veileds are usually considered starter Chams, as long as you have enough time to learn as much as you can, I’d say is ok
 
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