free range source of uv light

darrensimps

New Member
i was considering having a free range panther chameleon in my frog room, and had a thought about a sort of sun tunnel passing through the roof of the converted garage roof and having a basking spot below. but as ive been reading, glass wouldnt let enough uv light pass through for the cham, does anyone know what material would work on each end of the pipe?

thanks, darren
 

Venutus1

Avid Member
The reason I ask is for energy saving and a assume the light from the sun is the best form of light for any reptile?
Hi Darren,

Yes. sort of.
But only if your animal is outside in a properly set up (and amply shaded) cage.

Sunlight through a window *can* give you good "general" light...

but guess what... ?

ALL the UV is filtered out by the glass.

So if you are thinking that you can have your pet in front of a window like a potted plant... and it will live and thrive with no regulated heat/basking light or proper levels of UV....

I am sorry to say that you will kill it.

:eek:

Sorry to be blunt... :eek:..

so please forgive me.
:eek:

It is just because I care about this.

I must emphasize the seriousness of creating a PROPER ENVIRONMENT for these delicate tropical animals.
:)

A Cham plunked inside in front of a window...
probably will have trouble thermo-regulating and digesting its food,
just for starters.

Especially if the sun only comes through a short time each day.
Because that will not be enough to create a proper, controlled heat basking spot so they can thermoregulate and digest.

(OR - you will get TOO much and cook it.:eek:)

If that doesn't "do it in" first....
then it will just end up with MBD from lack of UV anyway.
Get stunted, deformed and crippled and and die a horrible death.

But there is good news!:D

If you do a search here - you will see you can use proper UV lighting and a basking spot over your free range animal and they can live a long happy life.

And be near a window to enjoy some "natural" (be it with filtered out UV) day-light.


Think:
Create an Environment that it has access to and can CHOOSE its own correct UV and heat/basking levels.:)

Good luck and use the knowledge in this forum wisely and ask questions & you will have a wonderful long lived healthy pet!
:)

Cheers!
Todd

oh BTW... *sigh*
reptiles are not an "energy efficient" hobby.
I once calculated once I have probably spent over 40,000.00 on electricity keeping animals alive. (reptiles, reef tanks, birds etc. etc.)
I am not saying that's a good thing- Talk about big carbon foot print!
ugh.
 

darrensimps

New Member
Thanks for the reply :). It wouldn't be placed by a window, my frog room is outside in a wee insulated brick garage with a flat roof, I was looking at a sun pipe (a small window in the roof with a highly reflective tubecoming into the room that could create a spot light of natural sun light) to create a basking area on the tree if I could find a material the keeps rain out but allows uv to pass through? I've read that quartz glass is transparent to uv?

I know hobbies aren't cheap, my frogs set ups cost me a small fortune, my thinking was that you can't beat natural uv?
 

Venutus1

Avid Member
OH!
LOL

Well then.....:cool:

Solacryl.

That is the the brand name of the UV transparent Plexi Glass.

Like the stuff they use in Tanning beds that you lay on.

If you have handy skills, then all you need to do is to do a google search,

get some of that... (warning : Its not very cheap.) and whip up sky lights!

It works well and many Zoos use it in transparent reptile room & green house set-ups.

But I still advise you to create some spot light set ups that are on to create a daily "predictable" basking spot for the animals.... that maybe could incorporate a thermal over-ride just to protect against over heating on the real hot summer days.

And I also would do a ceiling fixed fixture with at least one Arcadia 12% Ho t5 bulb in it.
Instead of it being on all day, you may want to have it on an inexpensive timer and on... say .. just a minimal, but predictable, few hours a day.
So you will still have a fail safe to give them UV for a few hours, and if they don't want it, then they would have a large enough "range" to move away. But it would still be there for them, like the heat lamps.

Cheers & can't wait to see pics!:D
Good luck!
Todd

Thanks for the reply :). It wouldn't be placed by a window, my frog room is outside in a wee insulated brick garage with a flat roof, I was looking at a sun pipe (a small window in the roof with a highly reflective tubecoming into the room that could create a spot light of natural sun light) to create a basking area on the tree if I could find a material the keeps rain out but allows uv to pass through? I've read that quartz glass is transparent to uv?

I know hobbies aren't cheap, my frogs set ups cost me a small fortune, my thinking was that you can't beat natural uv?
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
I think one of the main issues with your idea of the sun tube is creating one large enough to be beneficial. One reason using UV bulbs over cages works is because we can attract the chams to sit under them with a basking bulb located right next to the UV. They end up sitting under the UV daily that they get enough exposure. If your outdoor sun tube doesn't cover much of your cham's roaming area he can end up getting very little. I agree...a backup UV bulb on a regular schedule will do a lot and it will be available every day year round.

I suppose the only way you would not need the light was if you had some sort of photo sensitive switch that could detect "real" sunlight and turn off your bulb.
 

darrensimps

New Member
I see what you guys are saying, I could easily hook up a basking bulb on a timer, so he could get at it if he wants it.

I'm going to ring around some sun bed repair and maintenance companies tomorrow and see if they have anything I could use, was hoping to make some thing around 18" square, maybe if explain what it's for the might help.

I'm going to start work on extending one end of the frog room to make room for the main tree shortly, I'll keep a photo diary and show how its getting on.
Hopefully all these froglets that are coming through will find most of the work.
 

bradley

New Member
I would recommend a 12% Arcadia T5 bulb as it will give good uv over quite a large area. These bulbs are great.
 

Venutus1

Avid Member
I have those along my rows of dart frog vivs, plants love them!
Yes Sir!

Certain plants do real well with the Arcadia's... even though they say "in theory" that UV B does not do much for plants.

you know....
I sell tons of the 12% HO T5's to many indoor gardeners that swear by them for the health and vitality of their plants:rolleyes:.
;)

UV B light is a natural fungicide and has bacteriostatic properties and that may also be a reason because it may cut down on leaf mold & fungus related ailments too boot!

Cheers.
 

kodycorduan

New Member
Natural light is definitely the way to go with lizards. Even if it's less time with real sunlight that's better than more time with bulbs. My two cents anyways.
 

darrensimps

New Member
Natural light is definitely the way to go with lizards. Even if it's less time with real sunlight that's better than more time with bulbs. My two cents anyways.
That's what I was thinking in the beginning. :).




What sort of bush/tree would you all recommend?

Cheers, Dar
 
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