Dubia or crickets

Discussion in 'Chameleon Food' started by Char333p, Aug 11, 2018 at 11:43 PM.

  1. Char333p

    Char333p Established Member

    When it comes to maintaining your colony.
    I have trouble taking care of crickets w.o them dying easily and quickly. Even with awesome buffets of water crystals and foods.

    Will a dubia colony be much easier to sustain? Compared to crix?
     
  2. Matt Vanilla Gorilla

    Matt Vanilla Gorilla Chameleon Enthusiast

    Hi there. Sorry for your cricket challenge!

    Saying dubias or crickets is like saying that you will only eat apples or pears for the rest of your life! Nothing else! Pick one!

    I firmly believe that a massive amount of feeders are vital to chameleon health! I further believe that a massive variety in gutloading ingredients is vital to chameleon and bug health.

    Why not both?

    Let's problem solve your cricket situation! What do you feed them? Does the cricket cage have enough ventilation? Is it the correct tempersture? Etc.

    Please tell us about how you keep your crickets.
     
    #2 Matt Vanilla Gorilla, Aug 12, 2018 at 12:24 AM
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2018 at 6:00 PM
  3. Brodybreaux25

    Brodybreaux25 Avid Member

    Yes Dubai’s are about as easy as it gets. Read through this link:
    https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/dubai-roach-colony-care.129243/
     
    Arpretty likes this.
  4. Char333p

    Char333p Established Member

    I keep them in a 70 quart storage bin. Cut giant hole in top and added screen. I have assortment of cardboard tubes n egg cartons. Its kept in high 70s to mid 80s. Feed them carrots. Sweet potatoe some leafy greens and the flukers gutload.

    I have a second bin with younger crickets but theyre lasting longer then the larger ones.

    Wasnt planning on cutting them out of diet permenantly but as a main staple that will sustain itself a bit easier is what i meant.. when i go to feed my cham, its just like ohhh crap more crickets died gotta get more. Idk why theyre being stubborn for me.
     
  5. Brodybreaux25

    Brodybreaux25 Avid Member

    Some species of cricket are much hardier than others, what species are you trying to breed?
     
  6. Darthroastcoffee

    Darthroastcoffee Avid Member

    That’s odd! I keep a few hundred in a large tank at all times with a dirt and wood chip substrate so they keep breeding. I also keep a few hundred to 1000 crickets in a large plastic container for feeding off. The biggest thing I’ve found for myself is I never water them no water crystals nothing. Just fresh greens and they will get all the hydration they need. make sure they have a good spot to cluster up under something, I’ll take the egg crates and rip them up into strips and just throw them in a pile.
     
  7. NickTide

    NickTide Avid Member

    Crickets breed faster but roaches are easier. You will very seldom find dead nymphs in a dubia or orange head colony. And you could go on vacation for 2 weeks and it would only slow down breeding and growth. I use no water with my roaches just fruits and veggies.
     
  8. Char333p

    Char333p Established Member

    So do you leave heat on the breeding tank? And how do you keep soil damp for the eggs? Or does it not need to be?
     
  9. Char333p

    Char333p Established Member

    Banded crickets right now.
     
  10. Darthroastcoffee

    Darthroastcoffee Avid Member

    I don’t keep anything damp they do just fine. As long as it’s not rock hard, that’s why I mix with wood chips so it don’t pack together. If there’s nothing in there to mold up then you can spray once a week. I don’t spray them at all and they just keep reproducing! I have banded crickets also.
     
  11. Char333p

    Char333p Established Member

    May give your way a shot... can you private message me a picture of your breeding set up?
     
  12. todd2010

    todd2010 Member

    Yes, if you could start a threat on it, I would love it!
     
  13. JacksJill

    JacksJill Chameleon Enthusiast

    Are you buying adult crickets? They do have a life expectancy and you may be buying them at the end of theirs. I try to buy the minimum size mine will eat and raise them up from there.
     
    Matt Vanilla Gorilla likes this.
  14. Char333p

    Char333p Established Member

    Ive been getting mediums my guys only bout 6 to 7 months
     
    JacksJill likes this.
  15. Darthroastcoffee

    Darthroastcoffee Avid Member

    It’s hard to get time to sit and type anymore between chameleons and work my life has no spare moments! I try to reply and help that’s usually all I get time for. @Char333p I will try to get some time to send you some pics and more info. Sorry for the wait.
     
  16. Char333p

    Char333p Established Member

    Totally hear you been busy myself. But thanks for the info
     
  17. Char333p

    Char333p Established Member


    Omg!! So it turns out my younger cricket bin that i kept vermiculte on the bottom in. Had 100s of little babies!!!! Woohooo and i didnt even keep it damp either
     
  18. Darthroastcoffee

    Darthroastcoffee Avid Member

    There you go! now to keep them alive just throw some fresh greens I usually use kale, it’s not expensive and is usually always available in my supermarket. Your not gutloading them, yet!, your just keeping them fed and hydrated so they can grow! Also keep the same rule no water!. Just add some greens once a week not to much that it stays more then a few days without drying out.
     
  19. Char333p

    Char333p Established Member

    how do you recommend gutloading. Take the day or twos feeding and put them in smaller keeper with the proper foods? or does keeping the fluckers calcium food in there too
     
  20. Darthroastcoffee

    Darthroastcoffee Avid Member

    I don’t use any kind of commercial gutload. I only use fresh vegetables. I have tried using the gutload @Matt Vanilla Gorilla sells and it seems like it’s a really high quality mix. I’ve never seen my bugs eat anything up so quickly! I go through so many crickets I just put my gutload in every 2 days for them all to eat.
     

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