Chamazon

Not that I'm saying we should put a bunch of chameleons in South America but how do you think chams would do in the South American rain forest.

If all of the chameleons natural habitat is slashed and burned someday And South America is still left do you think that it would make a good place to put remaining chameleons.


Or would chameleons be kept in captivity until there. Natural habitat could be regrown
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
Depends on the cham

jacksons dont like the heat

veiled/panthers dont like LOTZ OF RAIN FOR WEEKS

On the other hand they could do like they are doing with the frogs; setup cargo containers with internal support systems. They take in fresh water and light from the outside can try to simulate the natural habitat.
 
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Olimpia

Biologist & Ecologist
Well, anyone who has been to the forests in Central and South America knows, there are cool areas too. In Costa Rica, for example, up on the volcanic mountains it gets cool at night, doesn't get very warm during the day, and during the rainy season (our summer) there is constantly water. Half the country is drier (the Pacific side) and the other is much more humid. So yea, these countries aren't just one solid warm blob, just like Madagascar's ecosystems change dramatically from one area to another.

That said, that would be a horrendous idea. It's what the animals in these other ecosystems need, is for new animals to come in an compete for food. So all the reptiles and amphibians that are also teetering on the edge in Central and South America would have to fight even harder to survive with added competition.

It never seems like a species is going to have as much impact on anther/others as it ultimately does.
 

nick barta

Chameleon Enthusiast
Site Sponsor
Well, anyone who has been to the forests in Central and South America knows, there are cool areas too. In Costa Rica, for example, up on the volcanic mountains it gets cool at night, doesn't get very warm during the day, and during the rainy season (our summer) there is constantly water. Half the country is drier (the Pacific side) and the other is much more humid. So yea, these countries aren't just one solid warm blob, just like Madagascar's ecosystems change dramatically from one area to another.

That said, that would be a horrendous idea. It's what the animals in these other ecosystems need, is for new animals to come in an compete for food. So all the reptiles and amphibians that are also teetering on the edge in Central and South America would have to fight even harder to survive with added competition.

It never seems like a species is going to have as much impact on anther/others as it ultimately does.
Well said.
 
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