Best brand

Winterlandbullies

New Member
So when I purchased my veiled I ##### up and purchased from petsmart due to convenience.... well I purchased the reptibreeze "chameleon kit" and I gotta say I absolutely hated this setup. First off it's flimsy as hell. Second there is no real base to this they make you have to buy a substrate tray. Third have any idea how hard it is to keep the humidity in one of these when you live in a state like Michigan.... I couldn't keep humidity over 10%. I started to look online. And came across the petsmart brand thrive. And I gotta say. I absolutely love their tropical essentials kit. It has a seal glass bottom. With glass door and sides with a screen top. In the top it has a port hole for cords. This is wonderful if your running a electric water dripper plant.....once again petsmart came through on this aspect also. Their brand thrive makes a water drip plant that fits perfectly in the tropical tank.i personally believe petsmart has uped the reptile game. What some of the enclosure brands have you guys found to work for you? Please let me know
 

Jpeff

Avid Member
Don't want to use that dripper it just recycles the water. Inless u clean. It every day and put fresh water in. Plain dipper or a cup with a hole in bottom way better. Inless your looking at different thrive cages then I seen you don't get the ventilation or air flow needed. You'll still need t5 for uvb. Cage u have will work for little while depending on size of your chameleon. You can use those window kits to cover three side to help with humidity. Don't need tray they sell. Just wipe out bottom of cage daily.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Third have any idea how hard it is to keep the humidity in one of these when you live in a state like Michigan....
Actually, many of us do. For areas like the Northeast and Great Lakes (among others) a well-built hybrid enclosure filled with live plants is best for maintaining humidities.

I started to look online. And came across the petsmart brand thrive. And I gotta say. I absolutely love their tropical essentials kit. It has a seal glass bottom. With glass door and sides with a screen top. In the top it has a port hole for cords. This is wonderful if your running a electric water dripper plant.....once again petsmart came through on this aspect also. Their brand thrive makes a water drip plant that fits perfectly in the tropical tank.i personally believe petsmart has uped the reptile game.
I'm sorry, but I disagree; IMO, thrive products—for the most part—aren't much better.

tropical essentials kit—Is that the 30 gal. one?
https://www.petsmart.com/featured-b...tials-kit---30-gallon-54521.html?cgid=5000640

Most adult chameleons (panther, veiled, Jackson's) require a minimum of 24 x 24 x 48 enclosure, which comes out to 120 gal. And some mfrs. are moving toward twice that size (48W x 24D x 48H).
The 30 gal thrive is only 1/4 of the minimum size, and will need to be upsized when the cham is around 6-9 months.

What some of the enclosure brands have you guys found to work for you? Please let me know
The most bang for the buck I've seen are Zen Habitats.
https://www.zenhabitats.com/products/2x2x4-pvc-reptile-enclosure-1
https://www.zenhabitats.com/products/4x2x4-pvc-reptile-enclosures

Nicer but pricier are Tamura Designs
https://tamura-designs.com/collections/enclosures/products/white-acrylic-door-24wide_24tall_48deep
https://tamura-designs.com/collections/enclosures/products/24x48x24-white-enclosure

There are other custom enclosure builders that go higher still.
https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=custom+reptile+enclosures

DIY is still an excellent option. It may or may not save you any money, but you can get exactly what you want. There are quite a few fabricators of aluminum framing, and PVC sheet stock has become almost ubiquitous. Wood framing is another (less expensive) option; it just needs to be sealed against humidity and moisture from misters & foggers. I've found plate glass to be less expensive than either acrylic or PVC.
 

Winterlandbullies

New Member
Actually, many of us do. For areas like the Northeast and Great Lakes (among others) a well-built hybrid enclosure filled with live plants is best for maintaining humidities.


I'm sorry, but I disagree; IMO, thrive products—for the most part—aren't much better.

tropical essentials kit—Is that the 30 gal. one?
https://www.petsmart.com/featured-b...tials-kit---30-gallon-54521.html?cgid=5000640

Most adult chameleons (panther, veiled, Jackson's) require a minimum of 24 x 24 x 48 enclosure, which comes out to 120 gal. And some mfrs. are moving toward twice that size (48W x 24D x 48H).
The 30 gal thrive is only 1/4 of the minimum size, and will need to be upsized when the cham is around 6-9 months.


The most bang for the buck I've seen are Zen Habitats.
https://www.zenhabitats.com/products/2x2x4-pvc-reptile-enclosure-1
https://www.zenhabitats.com/products/4x2x4-pvc-reptile-enclosures

Nicer but pricier are Tamura Designs
https://tamura-designs.com/collections/enclosures/products/white-acrylic-door-24wide_24tall_48deep
https://tamura-designs.com/collections/enclosures/products/24x48x24-white-enclosure

There are other custom enclosure builders that go higher still.
https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=custom+reptile+enclosures

DIY is still an excellent option. It may or may not save you any money, but you can get exactly what you want. There are quite a few fabricators of aluminum framing, and PVC sheet stock has become almost ubiquitous. Wood framing is another (less expensive) option; it just needs to be sealed against humidity and moisture from misters & foggers. I've found plate glass to be less expensive than either acrylic or PVC.
Yeah like I said
Don't want to use that dripper it just recycles the water. Inless u clean. It every day and put fresh water in. Plain dipper or a cup with a hole in bottom way better. Inless your looking at different thrive cages then I seen you don't get the ventilation or air flow needed. You'll still need t5 for uvb. Cage u have will work for little while depending on size of your chameleon. You can use those window kits to cover three side to help with humidity. Don't need tray they sell. Just wipe out bottom of cage daily.
I am changing the water in the drip plant daily.. then I have mini dripper for when at night.
Actually, many of us do. For areas like the Northeast and Great Lakes (among others) a well-built hybrid enclosure filled with live plants is best for maintaining humidities.


I'm sorry, but I disagree; IMO, thrive products—for the most part—aren't much better.

tropical essentials kit—Is that the 30 gal. one?
https://www.petsmart.com/featured-b...tials-kit---30-gallon-54521.html?cgid=5000640

Most adult chameleons (panther, veiled, Jackson's) require a minimum of 24 x 24 x 48 enclosure, which comes out to 120 gal. And some mfrs. are moving toward twice that size (48W x 24D x 48H).
The 30 gal thrive is only 1/4 of the minimum size, and will need to be upsized when the cham is around 6-9 months.


The most bang for the buck I've seen are Zen Habitats.
https://www.zenhabitats.com/products/2x2x4-pvc-reptile-enclosure-1
https://www.zenhabitats.com/products/4x2x4-pvc-reptile-enclosures

Nicer but pricier are Tamura Designs
https://tamura-designs.com/collections/enclosures/products/white-acrylic-door-24wide_24tall_48deep
https://tamura-designs.com/collections/enclosures/products/24x48x24-white-enclosure

There are other custom enclosure builders that go higher still.
https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=custom+reptile+enclosures

DIY is still an excellent option. It may or may not save you any money, but you can get exactly what you want. There are quite a few fabricators of aluminum framing, and PVC sheet stock has become almost ubiquitous. Wood framing is another (less expensive) option; it just needs to be sealed against humidity and moisture from misters & foggers. I've found plate glass to be less expensive than either acrylic or PVC.
Yes that's the enclosure. This one is only temporary. Thankfully my veiled is just a youngin little small dude. I am currently working on a larger bioactive enclosure for it. And I agree that a hybrid enclosure is the best move. Just for time being the thrive tank is perfect. For my currently setup location it is very dry. To a point where I could use a whole house humidifier and it wouldn't put a dent I a single bedroom. Literally only raised humidity in the room 10%.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Yes that's the enclosure. This one is only temporary. Thankfully my veiled is just a youngin little small dude. I am currently working on a larger bioactive enclosure for it. And I agree that a hybrid enclosure is the best move. Just for time being the thrive tank is perfect. For my currently setup location it is very dry. To a point where I could use a whole house humidifier and it wouldn't put a dent I a single bedroom. Literally only raised humidity in the room 10%.
(y)

I'm not sure "hybrid" is the best/most descriptive term anymore. :unsure: 🤷‍♂️ IME, when folks (and mfrs) began talking about 'hybrid' enclosures a few years ago, they were back & sides solid with screened front, door, & top. Since then, the mfrs have gone to glass or acrylic doors as well, leaving only a small screened area directly under the door—and the screened top for stack effect ventilation.

Bioactive should also help retain humidity, but IDK by how much (%).
Some things I've learned along the way...
1649338969292.png
:eek:

It's working out far better than we imagined.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Just a warning about those kits. They are not recommended for chameleons. Reason being they are built without an airflow intake at the bottom of the cage. So the air does not pull in and up to the top provide clean air. So there is no chimney effect for air circulation. You end up with stagnant air. Chams develop respiratory infections in these enclosures. Watch your temps as well. without the airflow intake it is very easy to end up with temps that are far too high for a young cham.

As for best brands... I use dragonstrand hybrid enclosures. I have been very impressed with Tamura designs enclosures as well.
 
Last edited:

Winterlandbullies

New Member
(y)

I'm not sure "hybrid" is the best/most descriptive term anymore. :unsure: 🤷‍♂️ IME, when folks (and mfrs) began talking about 'hybrid' enclosures a few years ago, they were back & sides solid with screened front, door, & top. Since then, the mfrs have gone to glass or acrylic doors as well, leaving only a small screened area directly under the door—and the screened top for stack effect ventilation.

Bioactive should also help retain humidity, but IDK by how much (%).
Some things I've learned along the way...

It's working out far better than we imagined.
Technically I should be able to use a diamond hole saw and add those covers to glass tank. Correct?
 

Jpeff

Avid Member
I've used diamond hole saw before. To cut drain hole and returns for salt water. If you don't knw what your doing will break glass. Water and lots of it. If it gets hot or catches its done. I've only broken 1 so far. Thinner the glass the harder it is. So keep that in mind. Also 1/4 inch and less glass is hard to drill. Most of time it's just bottom that u can't drill. But do 📷 test frist or will just end up with glass everywhere
 
Last edited:

Jpeff

Avid Member
Google how to see if glass is tempered can't drill tempered glass if just blows up. Most bowed or cuvred glass and bottom tempered
 

Jpeff

Avid Member
Score and tap is easy. Drilling easy to just need to knw how to and right tools. Better to have someone help to spray glass while drilling. Straight hole is hard part depend on how your doing it. YouTube has plenty of videos. But in my mind a 2x2x4 glass cage cost more then other options. Thrive brand is at the bottom of quality list is why they so cheap. Tried one for dart frogs leaked water after 2 month and went with zoomed one
 

Thatwizard420

Chameleon Enthusiast
SerpaDesign Youtube channel has really good info on Glass Cutting and glass drilling. That's where I learned the Phone Method to test for tempered glass.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom