Bean WEEVIL

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Are bean weevils available as feeders. Please not, I’m not asking about bean beetles, but bonafide been weevils, aka Acanthoscelides obtectus.
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
The reason I ask is that I stumbled across a chemical composition of them that had the calcium to phosphorus ratio of like 15 to 1!
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Interesting. I'd look for a second source to be sure it wasn't a typo like spinach.
It was a peer reviewed academic publication, so I think the error would have been corrected. The problem is google has a hard time finding info on the chemical composition of obscure bugs. Frustrating.
 

cyberlocc

Chameleon Enthusiast
The reason I ask is that I stumbled across a chemical composition of them that had the calcium to phosphorus ratio of like 15 to 1!
Seems valid, it's due to the Exo Skeleton mostly I believe. Beetles do not taste good to Chams, they are bitter, also very hard to digest.

Both that, and a calcium ratio similar, applies to most beetle species I believe.

Also Callosobruchus maculatus are "Bonafide, Bean Beetle Weevils" :). They are labelled as Cowpeas, due to their diffrening bean choice. Both both are extremely close relatives.

If you want a smaller High Calcium feeder, why not just go to the easy basic. Isopods :). You can get them in a few different sizes, baby chameleon sized (like this guy) up to 1/2 inch monsters. 12:1 C/P

Another goodie would be snails. There shell is entirely composed of Calcium Carbonate and a Protein. Chams can eat them, shell and all.

Once again, we have drastic size per species. From tiny glass snails, to massive Giant Afircans the size of footballs.
 
Last edited:

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Seems valid, it's due to the Exo Skeleton mostly I believe. Beetles do not taste good to Chams, they are bitter, also very hard to digest.

Both that, and a calcium ratio similar, applies to most beetle species I believe.

Also Callosobruchus maculatus are "Bonafide, Bean Beetle Weevils" :). They are labelled as Cowpeas, due to their diffrening bean choice. Both both are extremely close relatives.

If you want a smaller High Calcium feeder, why not just go to the easy basic. Isopods :). You can get them in a few different sizes, baby chameleon sized (like this guy) up to 1/2 inch monsters. 12:1 C/P

Another goodie would be snails. There shell is entirely composed of Calcium Carbonate and a Protein. Chams can eat them, shell and all.

Once again, we have drastic size per species. From tiny glass snails, to massive Giant Afircans the size of footballs.
Bean beetles are not weevils, though they are called that. They are missing the long rostral appendage characteristic of all true weevils. Isopods are a good idea, as are snails.
 

cyberlocc

Chameleon Enthusiast
Bean beetles are not weevils, though they are called that. They are missing the long rostral appendage characteristic of all true weevils. Isopods are a good idea, as are snails.
Neither Callosobruchus maculatus nor Acanthoscelides obtectus are Weevils. They are both known as "Bean Beetle Weevils" however.

Acanthoscelides obtectus were classed as Weevils, they are not anymore. They now belong to the Family Chrysomelidae (leaf beetles) same as Callosobruchus maculatus.
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Neither Callosobruchus maculatus nor Acanthoscelides obtectus are Weevils. They are both known as "Bean Beetle Weevils" however.

Acanthoscelides obtectus were classed as Weevils, they are not anymore. They now belong to the Family Chrysomelidae (leaf beetles) same as Callosobruchus maculatus.
Nice! I appreciate the correction.
 

salty dog

Chameleon Enthusiast
The football size snail sounds awesome!!! A head of lettuce gobbled up in hours and a 1/4" thick snail slime left behind it's travel path..awesome!!
 

cyberlocc

Chameleon Enthusiast
The football size snail sounds awesome!!! A head of lettuce gobbled up in hours and a 1/4" thick snail slime left behind it's travel path..awesome!!
Dude I WANT ONE SO BAD! Sadly we cant have nice things because stupid people in Florida bought them as pets, let them go and they decimated local agriculture so now they are HIGHLY illegal in the US :(, I remember really an article a while back some dude was importing them and selling them, got like 20 years, they aint playing about GALs.

giant-african-land-snail-babies-5b6899da002a8.jpg

Those are babies BTW :).

Here is a big one :)
GAL.jpg
 

cyberlocc

Chameleon Enthusiast
Do you keep those snails as pets @cyberlocc ?
I had two big ones a very long time ago but they didn't do well for me. I was so disappointed.
Kind of a Mix, we keep them as pets for now, with plans to feed the babies but still keep a couple "Breeders" as pets.

I see all my bugs as Pets, or I wouldn't keep them :). I just realize at the same time Circle of life and all that. Especially with Pet bugs. As they don't live very long.

I really want to (and hopefully I will get one or a couple) get some albinos. Those would def never be fed. :).

I wish I could get more interesting snails in AZ though. I like those grove snails, alot, but all we got where I live is Helix Aspersa.

If we could get Gals in the states, I would def do it.

And I been thinking about (but kind of risky) getting a GAM, and throwing it in the Cham cage for a CUC. I know that they can be poisonous if ingested, but as big as those things are, I doubt that would happen.
 

cyberlocc

Chameleon Enthusiast
Albinos would be interesting. Do they throw albinos very often?
Idk to be honest, I have seen pics on the net, and they did say that it's a trait like with snakes that can be passed. So breeding an albino will yeild quite a few per clucth. It's def a thing with Gals, they are sold, cost a pretty bit more, but they are sold in quantity so possible it's not that rare.
 
Top Bottom