Baby House Geckos - Good Source of Nutrients or Bad for Chams?

bberry820

Member
It is baby house gecko hatchling season here in Florida and I keep finding these cute little guys all over the place. They don't look like they would be poisonous and they are so small that their bones seem like they should be digestible. Aside the notion that you shouldn't feed wild caught food, would they be a good or bad food for an adult veiled chameleon? I am sure they would eat them in the wild if they had the opportunity but the house geckos are nocturnal so they probably don't run into each other often.

-Please base your opinion off of the food source and not the fact that these are wild caught. This is a curiosity question more than a practical question, I am not looking to test it out.-

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Beman

Social Media Manager
Staff member
So would a chameleon eat them yes. They are opportunistic feeders and will go after basically anything. Does this mean that we should feed them. Not in my opinion. Chameleons are insectivores so their system does not break down all the components of a live animal like this. It is not something that I would add to their diet for that simple fact. THe same as not feeding a Veiled fruit or vegetables. Again because their system does not break it down since they are insectivores. Just because something will eat something does not make it good for them.
 

bberry820

Member
So would a chameleon eat them yes. They are opportunistic feeders and will go after basically anything. Does this mean that we should feed them. Not in my opinion. Chameleons are insectivores so their system does not break down all the components of a live animal like this. It is not something that I would add to their diet for that simple fact. THe same as not feeding a Veiled fruit or vegetables. Again because their system does not break it down since they are insectivores. Just because something will eat something does not make it good for them.
I actually will give my veileds some apple slices once every while, its good dietary fiber and has a decent Ca:p ratio. They are more omnivorous than panthers and I would rather feed them fruit on occasion than have them eat their pothos.
 

Beman

Social Media Manager
Staff member
This what I read about it. So every other month. @Beman
yes more typically done with larger species like your Parsons... But again not commonly done. As Bill says it is a fair game thing. There are those that sit firmly on the side of not needed and those that insist on doing it. More commonly argued about then actively supported. lol
 

Beman

Social Media Manager
Staff member
I actually will give my veileds some apple slices once every while, its good dietary fiber and has a decent Ca:p ratio. They are more omnivorous than panthers and I would rather feed them fruit on occasion than have them eat their pothos.
That is up to you. But they do not process sugars... It is one thing to give them a leafy veg to munch on since that is plant matter that easily goes through their system but it is not recommended to do any fruit at all due to the sugar content.
 

Jpeff

Chameleon Enthusiast
I actually will give my veileds some apple slices once every while, its good dietary fiber and has a decent Ca:p ratio. They are more omnivorous than panthers and I would rather feed them fruit on occasion than have them eat their pothos.
Now on same page I got last pic of. Bill did have a whole thing about veiled. He said do not feed veiled anything but bugs. Had reason and reason y they think they do in wild so only bugs. It different when they eat ur plants
 

bbyoda

Chameleon Enthusiast
My vet has said feeding a pinkie mouse to a female chameleon that's just laid eggs can help replenish calcium levels. Other than helping with calcium, I'm not sure what nutrients the baby house gecko would provide, given that it's not being gutloaded.
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Ardi Abate and other CIN members have documented chameleons feeding on vertabrates (gecko's and baby chameleons) and plants in some chameleons species native habitats. That is especially Furcifer pardalis and Furcifer oustaleti (the CIN video "Madagascar A Land LIke No Other" is a good referrence). There are more than a few larger species that seem to relish making a meal out of vertabrates of appropriate size (personnel observations and article). That meaning these species seem to not be an unfamiliar part of some chameleons species diet. I think chameleons species making a meal out of vertabrates is a good way for them to load up on a natural source of calcium, preformed vitamin A, and in some scenerio's water.

Best Regards
Jeremy A. Rich
 
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