Anole Rescue!

The Wild One

Chameleon Enthusiast
I recently (abt an hour ago) spotted a baby anole lizard in my yard struggling to move, when I took a closer look she was missing toes and was very clumsy. I’ve decided to re-habilitate her for about a week. I’ve made an enclosure, with lots of hiding places, and I am misting her 3 times a day. I’ve seen her drink but I put out some mealworms to see if she would eat. None are gone so far, is there anything else I can do?
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Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
WASH YOUR HANDS>>>> Do not handle and touch your cham... Do not use stuff for this anole that you then use for the cham. small sized crickets may be more to its liking.
 

reddog

Member
Question on anoles transferring nasties to chams-

What about people that use outdoor caging? Anoles would surely get in the cage for water, shelter and excess feeders, and then most likely be eaten by the cham. Unless you use window screen instead of hardware cloth.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Question on anoles transferring nasties to chams-

What about people that use outdoor caging? Anoles would surely get in the cage for water, shelter and excess feeders, and then most likely be eaten by the cham. Unless you use window screen instead of hardware cloth.
I know a few of our keepers use both screen and the hardware cloth on their out door cages to keep anoles out. When I build mine I will have to do this because we have banana slugs here that invade everything and carry parasites.

I think in this situation my worry was more about touching the anole... then going and feeding the cham or misting the cham. Toughing the anole then getting feeders out. We don't think about the things we can't see...
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Are there any studies or confirmed cases of anoles transferring parasites to chameleons?
I don't know... But with my current experience I am learning about all the things we can not see. Most are very easy to treat with a dewormer etc. Some are horrendous and highly contagious to other chams. Some can very easily kill a cham. Some are extremely expensive to try to treat and clean for. So I think it is more of a what do you want to risk.

Myself I would prefer to spend a bit more money and do both screen and hardware cloth on an outdoor cage to limit exposure to things that could carry stuff to my cham if eaten or exposed to.

Again I do not know how high risk it would be but I have the type of luck that if something is going to go wrong it always does for me lol.
 

Goose502

Chameleon Enthusiast
Are there any studies or confirmed cases of anoles transferring parasites to chameleons?
I doubt there would ever be a study. But a known prey animal transferring a parasite/pathogen to the animal eating it is common. The problem being a chameleon raised in a cage most likely does not have the immune system or strong gut biome required to tolerate a newly introduced “wild” parasite. This exact situation as been encountered countless times in the hobby.
 

reddog

Member
I doubt there would ever be a study. But a known prey animal transferring a parasite/pathogen to the animal eating it is common. The problem being a chameleon raised in a cage most likely does not have the immune system or strong gut biome required to tolerate a newly introduced “wild” parasite. This exact situation as been encountered countless times in the hobby.
This is the post that makes me bring this up:


"Parasite myth unleashed...

There is repeatedly a myth presented by chameleon breeders I would like to address...

Myth: Feeding native US (or European) field plankton (bugs) is risky because they are full of parasites and they can infest my chameleons

Response: NO RISK.
Chameleon parasites are extremely specific and in most of cases they have complex live cycles need also other specific hosts for their development
US and EU based insects (even reptiles) are not vectors/hosts of any chameleon parasites, so from this perspective, feeding wild insects is Safe. They can transmit diseases and parasites, however, they will not infest chameleons.
Basically, offsprings are Parasite-free once they hatch. They can just get contaminated by the contact of unclean environment in captivity, where before, parasite infested chameleons were housed and the space has not been properly cleaned.

Caution is only recommended in the case of obtaining chameleons from unreliable sources, as
1. They can claim being CB and instead, they are WC
2. They can be animal dealers not taking care of hygiene and quarantine measures, thus parasites can be transmitted by their improper practice
3. Some of big breeders obtaining shipments of wild caught animals do not take proper care for he above as well

Caution is to be taken when interpreting fecal samples, as some parasites can be present as pseudoparasites (parasites of the eaten food items) and have no significance for the health state of the chameleon."
 

Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
Aren’t those invasive species? Anyhow, very similar care to most chameleon species, just don’t house them together...that anole would make a nice snack. And yes, most likely has a parasite load.
The Brown or Cuban Anole is definitely invasive. My 6yo son and I caught dozens a few weeks ago with a lizard noose while on vacation in Florida. I let him keep one. They love crickets and flies. My understanding is that they are out-competing our native Green anoles. The Browns have their work cut out for them because the Greens are absolutely prolific here.

My son was “helping” me in my wood shop this weekend and he found 18 green anole eggs in some cypress. So of course with everything he sees me do with my chams he begged to hatch them. I let him do everything and unfortunately he did break one with his tweezers, the little Green was nearly fully developed. Should be hatching very soon!
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Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
This is the post that makes me bring this up:


"Parasite myth unleashed...

There is repeatedly a myth presented by chameleon breeders I would like to address...

Myth: Feeding native US (or European) field plankton (bugs) is risky because they are full of parasites and they can infest my chameleons

Response: NO RISK.
Chameleon parasites are extremely specific and in most of cases they have complex live cycles need also other specific hosts for their development
US and EU based insects (even reptiles) are not vectors/hosts of any chameleon parasites, so from this perspective, feeding wild insects is Safe. They can transmit diseases and parasites, however, they will not infest chameleons.
Basically, offsprings are Parasite-free once they hatch. They can just get contaminated by the contact of unclean environment in captivity, where before, parasite infested chameleons were housed and the space has not been properly cleaned.

Caution is only recommended in the case of obtaining chameleons from unreliable sources, as
1. They can claim being CB and instead, they are WC
2. They can be animal dealers not taking care of hygiene and quarantine measures, thus parasites can be transmitted by their improper practice
3. Some of big breeders obtaining shipments of wild caught animals do not take proper care for he above as well

Caution is to be taken when interpreting fecal samples, as some parasites can be present as pseudoparasites (parasites of the eaten food items) and have no significance for the health state of the chameleon."
My chams are fed a nearly 100% wild caught diet from spring to fall for a few years now. That means running hundreds of WC feeders through each Cham and I have never picked up a parasite. They are tested every 6 months. I realize this isn’t a scientific study but my experience does back up his claims.
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
Are there any studies or confirmed cases of anoles transferring parasites to chameleons?
There is a guy here with parsons(plural) that gets a kick out of it when the anoles and tree frogs manage to get into the cages, and the parsons go on the hunt.

There are plenty of people here who have outdoor bug collectors, i assume they check for spraying in the area.

You would have to do some research on what parasites can be transferred via touch and eating. Most are not transferable. They can not survive the stomach in the adult form. You have seen the videos of the nightmare fuel horse hair worms escaping from crickets and spiders, but a cham can eat them all day long.
 

cyberlocc

Chameleon Enthusiast
This is the post that makes me bring this up:


"Parasite myth unleashed...

There is repeatedly a myth presented by chameleon breeders I would like to address...

Myth: Feeding native US (or European) field plankton (bugs) is risky because they are full of parasites and they can infest my chameleons

Response: NO RISK.
Chameleon parasites are extremely specific and in most of cases they have complex live cycles need also other specific hosts for their development
US and EU based insects (even reptiles) are not vectors/hosts of any chameleon parasites, so from this perspective, feeding wild insects is Safe. They can transmit diseases and parasites, however, they will not infest chameleons.
Basically, offsprings are Parasite-free once they hatch. They can just get contaminated by the contact of unclean environment in captivity, where before, parasite infested chameleons were housed and the space has not been properly cleaned.

Caution is only recommended in the case of obtaining chameleons from unreliable sources, as
1. They can claim being CB and instead, they are WC
2. They can be animal dealers not taking care of hygiene and quarantine measures, thus parasites can be transmitted by their improper practice
3. Some of big breeders obtaining shipments of wild caught animals do not take proper care for he above as well

Caution is to be taken when interpreting fecal samples, as some parasites can be present as pseudoparasites (parasites of the eaten food items) and have no significance for the health state of the chameleon."

The problem with this statement, and I tried to explain this to him, when he told me this same speel (long before this post, however we were discussing WC Vieileds in Florida)

For 1, it's not completely correct, as far as plankton as he says maybe. However things like Rat Lungworm, found in land snail's can and will infect Chams, and Humans alike.

The second issue, is more area specific. This may have some truth if you live in the Midwest, like Brody. However WC veilied in Florida, and Jackson's in Hawaii have been introduced with Parasites in their system.

Parasites don't stay in them, they leave through their fecal ect. Which is then walked through/eaten by bugs, which then transfer the disease. Remeber Bemans thread the other day? Coccidia can live for years in soil, without a host.

Is the Coccidia native to FL? No, but it doesn't have to be, as it was introduced when people brought wild vieleds who then escaped their free range farms.
 

reddog

Member
The Brown or Cuban Anole is definitely invasive. My 6yo son and I caught dozens a few weeks ago with a lizard noose while on vacation in Florida. I let him keep one. They love crickets and flies. My understanding is that they are out-competing our native Green anoles. The Browns have their work cut out for them because the Greens are absolutely prolific here.

My son was “helping” me in my wood shop this weekend and he found 18 green anole eggs in some cypress. So of course with everything he sees me do with my chams he begged to hatch them. I let him do everything and unfortunately he did break one with his tweezers, the little Green was nearly fully developed. Should be hatching very soon!
View attachment 239814View attachment 239815View attachment 239816
Glad to hear the greens are doing well where you are. The browns are really taking over here. How can you tell the difference between green and brown eggs?
 

Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
The problem with this statement, and I tried to explain this to him, when he told me this same speel (long before this post, however we were discussing WC Vieileds in Florida)

For 1, it's not completely correct, as far as plankton as he says maybe. However things like Rat Lungworm, found in land snail's can and will infect Chams, and Humans alike.

The second issue, is more area specific. This may have some truth if you live in the Midwest, like Brody. However WC veilied in Florida, and Jackson's in Hawaii have been introduced with Parasites in their system.

Parasites don't stay in them, they leave through their fecal ect. Which is then walked through/eaten by bugs, which then transfer the disease. Remeber Bemans thread the other day? Coccidia can live for years in soil, without a host.

Is the Coccidia native to FL? No, but it doesn't have to be, as it was introduced when people brought wild vieleds who then escaped their free range farms.
Lol Southeast Louisiana, about an hour from the Gulf of Mexico.
 
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