Trioceros quadricornis Horns

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
It has been a long time since I have worked with this species however I'm still a huge fan. I have heard some old rumors that were never confirmed as false or true. Has anyone who has worked with this species ever come across a quadricornis male that was captive bred or wild caught that had more than four horns? I heard this rumor first in the 90's and it would be great to hear if someone from the forums had seen a wild caught with more than four horns and spectacular to hear someone captive bred a quadricornis with more than four horns. Are there any of you out there that have seen more than four horns on a male quadricornis?:cool::cool::cool:
 

Chase

Chameleon Enthusiast
Your thread sparked some intrest, so I went and counted my Quad's horns. Well, he has the four bigger ones, but has two smaller ones that I think will get bigger. I can see them, and they definately look like horns, just very small.

LPR08
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Your thread sparked some intrest, so I went and counted my Quad's horns. Well, he has the four bigger ones, but has two smaller ones that I think will get bigger. I can see them, and they definately look like horns, just very small.

LPR08

I would be interested to see if his back set of horns develops further into a well formed third pair of horns. Post some pictures to document his horn growth as he matures.

Anyone have got a quadricornis developing a fourth pair of horns:D!
 

Kent67

Retired Moderator
I had a wc male back in the days before digital cameras that had 8 horns. The 4th pair was little more than nubs but horns they were. I'll have to see if I can find the old photos and see if they're visible enough to post. Ardi Abate took some photos of him also but I don't think he ever made it to the CIN.
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
I had a wc male back in the days before digital cameras that had 8 horns. The 4th pair was little more than nubs but horns they were. I'll have to see if I can find the old photos and see if they're visible enough to post. Ardi Abate took some photos of him also but I don't think he ever made it to the CIN.

Sweet If you can post picture that would be great. I have got a video done buy Sticky Tongue Farms and they had a male that looked like it had 3 pairs of well developed horns (not the best footage). Kent was your males 3rd pair of horns well developed or were they noticeably smaller than the first two pairs of horns.
 

Kent67

Retired Moderator
Wow, you've got that video! That's one I never got a chance to pick up, Linda Davison is still a good friend and even SHE doesn't have a copy of it. Any chance I could get a dvd rip or borrow it, rip it, and send it right back? I'm sure she'd love a copy and so would I.

As for the quad, and from what I remember, the 3rd pair was well-formed but definitely not as large as the front 2 pairs.
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Wow, you've got that video! That's one I never got a chance to pick up, Linda Davison is still a good friend and even SHE doesn't have a copy of it. Any chance I could get a dvd rip or borrow it, rip it, and send it right back? I'm sure she'd love a copy and so would I.

As for the quad, and from what I remember, the 3rd pair was well-formed but definitely not as large as the front 2 pairs.

Actually I have got that video at my apartment in Davis as after I posted about the 6 horn quadricornis I was going to watch that movie and its not at the Calaveras county house. I can loan it to you if you send a dvd copy back to me with the original. I have got the first CIN video as well.


Six well formed horns is amazingly good!
 
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Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
One of the problems is determining what to count as horns and what are just enlarged scales of the rostral crest (it can be difficult to differentiate at times). Technically T. q. quadricornis is only supposed to have one to two pairs of horns while T. q. gracilior can have up to three pairs of horns. I believe there are photos in both the second edition of Necas' book and Tilbury's new book of what I would call classic examples of T. q. gracilior where the males exhibit a well formed third pair of rostral horns. Unfortunately I've never seen a good closeup of the horns themselves to see how exactly they developed. It is also known that T. q. gracilior can have a single or the more typical two pairs of horns but you never see photos of these specimens from the field so its often hard to definitively ID the subspecies. I'm leaving for Cameroon in 4 weeks and we'll be going to both T. q. quadricornis and T. q. gracilior habitat. I'm hoping to get some good material to help differentiate these two subspecies and I'll be sure to take good photos of the horns on any we find.

Chris
 
Triceros q. quadricornis with 5 well developed horns

He was sold to me as a quad with 7 horns, but upon close examination, he only has 5 truely annulated horns. What kind of looks like two other horns are simply scaly outgrowths (not annulated). Still, he's one of the coolest quads I've come across, both in terms of looks and temperament. Doesn't shy away from me in the slightest. I'd love to see this "calm" trait selectively bred. I'm looking for females to preserve his genes. :)

Perry
 

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