Swollen foot with black spot

ChumCharlie

New Member
Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - Male Jackson - owned for 5 months
  • Handling - extremely rarely
  • Feeding - Super worms, crickets, dubia roaches - gut loaded with papaya/carrots. He generally only eats ~3 large roaches daily but always has access to food.
  • Supplements - D3 2x monthly, Multivit 2x monthly, Calcium daily
  • Watering - Mistking mister - mists 5x daily in 2-4 minute increments
  • Fecal Description - White urate and solid feces
  • History - N/A

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Screen front, 4ft tall
  • Lighting - 5.0 UVB and basking lamp
  • Temperature - Basking spot ~80-85. Lowest temps overnight ~70-72
  • Humidity - Humidity ~60-75
  • Plants - All chameleon friendly plants
  • Placement - Low traffic office area
  • Location - WA state

Current Problem - I noticed a couple days ago that he was favoring one of his feet and it seemed to swell up a bit. It's been swollen since, but this morning I noticed a black spot on the top of his foot. I don't see how he could burn his foot with the way the cage is set up, so I don't really think it was that, though I suppose he could have climbed to the top and sat his foot directly under the lamp. I know a vet visit is probably due but wanted some opinions, as he seems to just dangle his foot and not really put weight on it.
I tried to get the best picture I could but didn't want to handle him for too long.

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CJ's Exotics

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hard to be sure but it could be an infection? Any more photos? Has he had any wounds previously to his feet?
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
Your supplement schedule is twice as much as it should be for a montane species like Jackson,s. It maybe setting him up to have gout. What ever the source that infection and swelling will need veterinary care. I'm guessing antibiotics and other meds may be needed.

"As a montane species (native to higher altitudes) Jackson's have decreased supplementation requirements compared to tropical species due to metabolism differences. Use calcium (without D3 or phosphorus) twice a week, a multivitamin once a month, and calcium with D3 once a month."
 
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