Some Questions About My Rudis Chameleon Enclosure

johncjb

New Member
I am about to get 2-3 Rudis Chameleons and I have some questions: :D

Is it alright to keep 2 - 3 of these little guys in one 2'x2'x4' screen cage? According to the New Chameleon Handbook they can be kept together, but according to some (random online) sources they can't.

Is it alright if I keep them in this large cage as babies? (They will be 2-3 inches from Backwater Reptiles).

Is it ok if I use terrarium moss to cover the plants dirt instead of rocks? (I'm afraid a little guy might try to climb underneath a rock and get crushed). This is what I'm looking at: http://www.lllreptile.com/products/2756-live-terrarium-moss
 

xephyr17

New Member
I might say (don't tell anyone I said this) you could keep the little ones together.

However, you'll need separate spaces for them when they're older
 

johncjb

New Member
I might say (don't tell anyone I said this) you could keep the little ones together.

However, you'll need separate spaces for them when they're older
Really? Because the New Chameleon Handbook says they can be kept in groups. :confused:

Not sure what to think here :confused:
 

Cait0420

New Member
I keep mine together with no problems. I have read and have been told by many people that they do in fact prefer to be in groups
 

junglefries

Established Member
If you get babies down the road or for some reason decide to sell them, pm please about them. Curious little critters. On the fence about trying them.
 

CarlC

Established Member
Yes you can raise sternfeldi babies in the same enclosure. I have eight young ones living together currently. This weekend the young ones will be split up into smaller groups. Once the ones I decide to keep get closer to maturity the will be kept singly. My adult group (2.4) all live separately. I do not keep the adults in groups because it makes it way to difficult to monitor food intake and breeding.

Keep your eye's on the classified section if interested. I will have some available very soon.

Carl
 
Since I've never kept them I most likely should keep my mouth shut but I would worry about keeping them together at first as it would be easier to monitor their health as they settle in if they are separated - also easier to monitor food intake & such with a smaller cage -
 

Manu

New Member
Hello from good (c)old Austria (no, not where kangaroos are coming from... ;) )!



Of course keeping them single is not the only way to success - but it's a quite good way (if the animal's remaining requirements are fullfilled at the best).
As already said, keeping them single gives you the option of more control.
When a single animal in a group isn't eating very well, you can't definitely say if it is sick or "just" stressed by the others.


And most keepers and breeders with long-term experience (not only f1-generation once or twice) know, that it just sounds like a lot of work raising chameleons single - in fact it makes nearly everything much easier (for example [as mentioned above]: feeding a group requires a lot of monitoring (who's eating, who not, maybe also: how can I put some "extra food" to the conspicuous animal backward without seen by the others, do I have to separate the animal right away or not... and so on);

feeding a single animals is usually: open the terrarium - putting the food insinde - shot.
So, also if there are "many" seperate small enclosures, one would be still faster at last (and over some time).



With the best regards,
Emanuel
 

johncjb

New Member
Yes you can raise sternfeldi babies in the same enclosure. I have eight young ones living together currently. This weekend the young ones will be split up into smaller groups. Once the ones I decide to keep get closer to maturity the will be kept singly. My adult group (2.4) all live separately. I do not keep the adults in groups because it makes it way to difficult to monitor food intake and breeding.

Keep your eye's on the classified section if interested. I will have some available very soon.

Carl
I certainly will. :D I was going to buy them from Backwater until I saw the reviews :eek:
Ill probably go with having 2-3 in one cage, but having a spare cage in case they feel stressed or sick.

Anyone know if it is possible to place moss in the plants' pots instead of stones?
 

Manu

New Member
Hi!



Anyone know if it is possible to place moss in the plants' pots instead of stones?
I'm afraid I do not fully understand - you mean stones to cover the soil of the pots?

If so - yes, moss would be very fine. To be honest, I used moss very keenly (concerning "livebearers" such as Trioceros).
That and lichens - both have an excellent (positive) effect on the stability of the micro-climate in the terrarium.



With the best regards,
Emanuel
 

johncjb

New Member
Hi!





I'm afraid I do not fully understand - you mean stones to cover the soil of the pots?

If so - yes, moss would be very fine. To be honest, I used moss very keenly (concerning "livebearers" such as Trioceros).
That and lichens - both have an excellent (positive) effect on the stability of the micro-climate in the terrarium.



With the best regards,
Emanuel
Yes, because I'm afraid that they will be crushed if they try to climb under the rocks. Also because I think they should have somewhere to stand on the ground, as the bottom of the cage will have small puddles of water and will not be very comfy for a tired/pregnant cham.
 

Manu

New Member
Hi,



for sitting and "resting" pieces of bark fixed on their "favourite-branches" (e. g. with cable fixers...) would do well.
Most females would also prefer this places for "giving birth"!

As mentioned, covering the pots with moss would be great; you can also "carpet" the rest of the ground with moss.
Branches with loads of lichens (the bearded ones - "bearded moss") would help to keep moisture more constantly, the animals would drink the water dripping down from them, they sometimes would serve as additional diet, give the chameleons a feeling of security and last but not least they would look great (habitat-like)!



With the best regards,
Emanuel
 

johncjb

New Member
I actually never even thought of covering the ground with moss. Would it survive on the plastic if it was moist?
 

Manu

New Member
Hey,




hereafter just a few examples from some of my („livebearing“) Trioceros-enclosures (for neonates, juveniles/subadults, adults).
As you can see, mostly pure moss is used as soil – outdoor as well as indoor. Proper moisting and live plants (loads of various lichens, epiphytic plants and climbers) prevent the terrarium from becoming to marshy, but help to keep levels of higher (resp. more stable) moisture for a longer time.
Moderate moisture is no problem, the moss and most plants will benefit from it.
































With the best regards,
Emanuel
 

johncjb

New Member
Wow, that's an incredible collection of plants in there! It's difficult to tell from the pics, but do you have dirt on the floor? if so, how do you keep it from slipping through the screen cage?
 

Manu

New Member
Hello,

no, the bottoms of my indoor-eclosures are all proof to water and dirt. If the bottom isn't already waterproof, I use plastic tablecloths (readily available, easy to process & adapt to own ideas, cheap...).

With the best regards,
Emanuel
 
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