Shedding...twice?!

Amanda1801

New Member
Hey

Just wondering if its normal for a cham to shed twice in succession?

He's pretty much just finished his first shed - literally within a few days, and now appears to be starting to shed again?

I'm thinking that this may be because hes gained so much weight since ive had him (he was really malnourished when I got him) and because he's now got a proper diet, he's grown quite a bit too.

He's still active and drinking, but he's eating minimally. Today he ate 2 butterworms, which is the most he's eaten in one day for ages - hes only had one shed with me before this one/two and he stopped eating then so I'm not toooo concerned about that. Waiting for a delivery of silkworms, so hopefully they should entice him into eating normally again!

Just wanted peoples opinions really!

Cheers
 

jojackson

New Member
Occasionaly they shed seemingly in stages, for example, the casque first, spreading down the spine. This seems to be completed and a few days later, shedding the tail, legs, feet.
This can appear to be 2 complete sheds in succession which is confusing.
It may ofcourse have actually shed twice in succession re growth, or reparation of damaged skin e.g a burnt animal or similar injury can trigger a few 'healing sheds'.
Eitherway, Its no drama, provided your animal has not been infected by reptile mites from another animal in the room for example.
(dont panic, im sure its unlikely :))
 

Amanda1801

New Member
Occasionaly they shed seemingly in stages, for example, the casque first, spreading down the spine. This seems to be completed and a few days later, shedding the tail, legs, feet.
This can appear to be 2 complete sheds in succession which is confusing.
It may ofcourse have actually shed twice in succession re growth, or reparation of damaged skin e.g a burnt animal or similar injury can trigger a few 'healing sheds'.
Eitherway, Its no drama, provided your animal has not been infected by reptile mites from another animal in the room for example.
(dont panic, im sure its unlikely :))
It's def. twice going in his normal pattern of rib area first, then legs/spine/casque - I think he's just growing lots!
 

jojackson

New Member
Rapid growth in young chams is par for the course. The longer your a very small lizard, the more chance there is of ending up a wildlife happy meal! :)
If it's female, it's wise to be vigilent of food intake. Im currently raising my first female cham
and im finding that Ive had to alter feeding habits a bit, i.e. Im monitoring weight gain to ensure steady but slightly slower weight gain than in my male, and feeding on a per day basis rather than as-lib as I do with Homer.
Though both sexes will take full advantage of available food, a certain balance must be struck.
In nature, their rapid growth and sometimes voracious appetites, mean they will (given a good food supply) reach maturity quickly, which is an advantage if you wish to procreate
and pass on your genetics.
However, nature being random, this tends to balance out.
In captivity though, food avail and nutrition are less random, and naturally, your lizard will take full advantage.
For both males and females, one issue associated with captive food intake is that growth may outstrip bone development. This equates to a weaker skeleton and a higher possibility of injury/fractures and the possibility of metabolic bone disease.
For females specifically, this issue is somewhat intensified, since she requires a higher calcium absorbtion approaching maturity which is used for egg development.
Too rapid growth and weight gain in a female will fast track maturity and the development of eggs, and since the lizards body thinks times are good, larger clutches than its calcium reserves can accomodate.
This will lead to even heavier calcium depletion from the lizards body, making MBD and distocia (egg binding) far more likely.
Difference between wild and captive in this situation is that a wild diet will be naturally limited but also of far greater variety, meaning the uptake of minerals and calcium from varuios sources will be better.
So careful monitoring of a females weight/growth seems prudent and so far I have no issues to report, though mine is around 5 months or so.
Within a few months she will produce a first batch of unfertile eggs and Im hoping an average or minimal clutch, which will indicate im on the right track.
Its not unheard of though, that people have females producing eggs as early as this (not desirable) or producing very large calcium depleting clutches (not desirable either)
so please wish me and my lizard luck. :)
Regular weight monitoring (say once a month) will give you a better idea of your lizards development, be male or female.
Just thought Id mention that. Very likely though your chams growth is ok, It still amazes me! :)
 
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