Parasites

Kristen Wilkins

Chameleon Enthusiast
Of course in a perfect world obviously , not saying he’s right of course there are lots of stuff that comes into factors that need to be evaluated as well
At some point the parents would have been wild could . carried on through off spring saying Jills scenario is possible Coccidia is viable for two years . It could be generations really . Something to ask him I think anyhow .
 

JoXie411

Chameleon Enthusiast
At some point the parents would have been wild could . carried on through off spring saying Jills scenario is possible Coccidia is viable for two years . It could be generations really . Something to ask him I think anyhow .
He believes a reptile should always be tested b4 it’s sold. I’m not castrating any breeders Of course I know wild caught need to be brought in but in his opinion a Cham shouldn’t be breed till it comes out clean.

This aren’t my thought these are my vets so please understand I’m not calling anyone out.
 

Kristen Wilkins

Chameleon Enthusiast
I just wouldn't tar and feather someone because their second or third generation wasn't parasite free and convict them of selling wild caught as captive bred.
I find it interesting that he is saying eggs shouldn't be moved or cleaned after they are laid as this might be how we are reducing the rate of parasite infection down the line.
My thoughts !. It would have been from the wild caught from beginning . His theory would be correct , but carried through offspring .
 

Kristen Wilkins

Chameleon Enthusiast
He believes a reptile should always be tested b4 it’s sold. I’m not castrating any breeders Of course I know wild caught need to be brought in but in his opinion a Cham shouldn’t be breed till it comes out clean.

This aren’t my thought these are my vets so please understand I’m not calling anyone out.
Agreed I test my babies 3 times a year . Know under this theory I would not need to because they have always been clean . I do it because they spend time out side .
 

Rst_Cham

Chameleon Enthusiast
Credit: Petr Necas

Parasite myth unleashed...

There is repeatedly a myth presented by chameleon breeders I would like to address...

Myth: Feeding native US (or European) field plankton (bugs) is risky because they are full of parasites and they can infest my chameleons

Response: NO RISK.
Chameleon parasites are extremely specific and in most of cases they have complex live cycles need also other specific hosts for their development
US and EU based insects (even reptiles) are not vectors/hosts of any chameleon parasites, so from this perspective, feeding wild insects is Safe. They can transmit diseases and parasites, however, they will not infest chameleons.
Basically, offsprings are Parasite-free once they hatch. They can just get contaminated by the contact of unclean environment in captivity, where before, parasite infested chameleons were housed and the space has not been properly cleaned.

Caution is only recommended in the case of obtaining chameleons from unreliable sources, as
1. They can claim being CB and instead, they are WC
2. They can be animal dealers not taking care of hygiene and quarantine measures, thus parasites can be transmitted by their improper practice
3. Some of big breeders obtaining shipments of wild caught animals do not take proper care for he above as well

Caution is to be taken when interpreting fecal samples, as some parasites can be present as pseudoparasites (parasites of the eaten food items) and have no significance for the health state of the chameleon.
I remember reading this on his facebook page, very interesting. Since then, I've been feeding my cham some wild caught grasshoppers and he occasionally catches other bugs outside when in his little trees. I had a fecal done just yesterday, all clear!
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
@JacksJill quoted/said...Petr is right most parasites are host specific meaning a specific species of parasite can only infect and reproduce in certain species or maybe a whole genus of animals. What he fails to mention are
"Accidental or incidental parasite
These are parasites that establish themselves in or on a host in which they do not normally live. For example, it is common for nematodes, normally parasitic in insects, to live for a short time in the intestines of birds or for a dog flea to bite a human."
It is uncommon and this kind of infection will not produce offspring for the parasite it can cause mild or severe symptoms for the incidental host. If you do feed field caught insects you should let your veterinarian know you do so should any problems arise."...
Exactly! There are parasites that can get into the "wrong" host and cause immense problems.
 
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