New owner question

NakedDogMom

New Member
I will be picking up our new Jackson's tonight. She is a 1 1/2 year old female and is coming from a local breeder who is getting out of Jackson's and into other chams.

Now, she is already in a screen enclosure and that is coming with her, but it sounds like he's had soil and sphagum (is that how you spell it?) peat moss on top.

From what I've read, this is not acceptable. He's housed her in this since he's had her from 2 months old.

Can anyone let me know about this?
 

MWheelock

Veterinarian
There are lots of ways to do things, but some things are better than others.

He was probably using soil and moss to help maintain humidity in the cage as they will hold moisture better. These two substrates are not ultimately bad, but can create issues that you may not wish to deal with.

Chams are arboreal (with exceptions), so don't really need a substrate at all. Things like moss and soil may provide cover for the insects that you will be feeding. It may also cause issues if ingested by the cham. (Usually not, but if you don't really need it, why use it.) You also must remember that alot of potting soil contains fertilizers that may present problems as well. Finally, it is much harder to clean if you have naturalistic substrate. Paper towels are a lot easier to change out.

For my cham, I don't have any substrate except the soil that is in the potted plants. I change the soil to not fertilized and cover them with some large river stones. The live plants maintain humidity, but I still mist frequently.

I do have crested geckos that are in a naturalistic vivaria. They have moss and coconut fiber and a little soil for their substrate. They have a higher humidity requirment, so this is how I help to maintain it.

Good luck.:)
Matthew
 
Can anyone let me know about this?
I use paper towel in my cages as well, I find it much easier to clean. Plus, I have some Chams that will eat the substrate no matter what, specifically my Veileds. It's such a pain. That, and moss and peat really encourage bacterial growth, which can cause health problems. Something nobody wants to deal with.

Is there a drain in the bottom of the cage? What kind of drip system was being used??

-Jaz
 
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