new guy here

bfaus875

New Member
well i have been trying to raise african cichlids (Fish)but that is really being a pain and no luck what so ever. im looking for another hobby and i was thinking of getting a chameleon. i would like to use my 75 gallon aquarium as its home. What would i all need and what kind of chameleon is best for amateurs (not to expensive ether)

Thanks everyone.
 

Julirs

New Member
I am fairly new to this Chameleon thing-but let me warn you that unless you want to spend tons of time and $$ along with some stress, do not bother getting a chameleon. They cannot be kept in tanks. They must have the correct lighting and humidity and supplements. I have done months of research, and lost my first (too young) cham after only 4 days. Have only had my new one for a week but thanks to a good breeder, internet research, and this forum we are off to a good start. Sounds like you may be better off with something like a bearded dragon???
 

Brad Ramsey

Retired Moderator
If you want to use that aquarium, I would look into the pygmy or leaf chameleons. I don't have experience with them, but several people here do. It is an animal I am very interested in exploring and a glass aquarium that size could house a nice community of them.

-Brad
 
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scooter4n

Established Member
This is pretty much only chameleon you can have in the glass tank, for all the other kinds you will need screen cage
http://www.chameleonnews.com/brevcare.html
http://www.chameleonnews.com/stumphabitat.html
read this article in here very much everything you need to know about them.
Do a search on this forum for more posts about this chameleon, search for names: pygmy ; leaf chameleon
Talk to this members, they are very experienced :
roo
Heika
my leaf chams coming tomorrow and I can't wait, read up my post here about me preping my setup: https://www.chameleonforums.com/leaf-chameleon-help-needed-2223/
 
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MWheelock

Veterinarian
If you think african ciclids are a pain, you will be in a world of hurt with chameleons regardless of the species.

My suggestion would be crested gecko's if you want something arboreal. No real UVB lights required (though I use them.) No real temp issues as they like ambiant temps that are in the home. They can eat babyfood (or T-Rex diet) +/- insects. They are pretty friendly and will handfeed without much effert. Don't mind being held and come in a variety of colors. You also can keep multiple animals in an enclosure without problem (no multiple males). Only down side is that humidity has to be kept high. Also they are nocturnal, so they really become super active until like 10pm-4am.

I agree that beardies or uromastyx would also be a good choice for a tank that big if you are looking for a larger lizard. Blue tongued skink may also be on that list, though now you start talking about UVB bulbs and increases in heating requirements. You also start talking about increased efforts in dealing with nutritional demands if they won't eat pelleted diets. Probably more expensive to keep than geckos.

If "not too expensive" is one of your prerequisites, DO NOT get a chameleon. These little buggers are expensive pains in the ass. Most of them are pretty ungrateful. Mine gives me the hairy eyeball every day when I feed him or just walk by his cage.
Don't get me wrong, I find him interesting and hilarious, but I'm not dillusional about our relationship.

Good luck,
Matthew
 

jleahl

New Member
Or, you could consider a frog or two...that tank would make a great terrarium-type setup for a couple White's tree frogs, or several red-eyed tree frogs, or a whole lot of dart frogs. Actually, that sort of depends on the shape of the tank....if it's not real tall, the White's probably wouldn't enjoy it a lot. I think you should hit Kingsnake and look at all the different critters people keep; there are a lot less expensive and demanding than chams!:)
 
Go with a group of Mali Uromastyx. You'll love them. Out of all the reptiles I sell, I feel best about selling Uromastyx- to any experience level of reptile keeper.

In a 75 gallon, you could comfortably fit one male, and up to few females. Males reach around 14" and females a tad smaller.

They are primarily vegitarian, so food costs will be cheap even in groups.
The newer Mercury Vapour bulbs are incredible for these guys, providing enough heat and UV.
 
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