Need a bit of advice about abscess/ "pimple"

JeneenDeAnne

New Member
Just be aware that you will have to have her on the "diet" by the time she reaches sexual maturity/receptive colors and control the temperature to prevent her from laying huge clutches and developing MBD, follicular stasis, dystocia, etc. If you need information about the diet, etc, let us know.
Ok... What exactly is "the diet"? 😊
So far I have had her on a rotation/mixture of : dubai roaches, superworms, soldier fly larvae, as her staple and wax worms & crickets as a treat. Now that she is a bit older her appetite is about 4 staple & maybe a couple treat...depending if she comes to let me know (she has Me trained & when she wants food she is at the screen door staring me down & its usually late morning. I made a dripper & she will go to the top of her branch staring at the leaf the water drips from LoL) but she appears to have moved herself to an every-other-day feeding schedule.
Also, her temp stays at 82 at the top of her branch, 79-80 in her preferred mid range & 78 at her lowest perch spot. She does not seem to appreciate me if I allow her mid level temp to exceed 80 however. Her enclosure is screen w/plexi glass that I remove to give 100% fresh air
 

Decadancin

Moderatoris Americanus
Staff member
Not just “diet” but also temps. For females, the idea is to either slow or reduce the size of clutch development. In theory, if your temps are about 8 degrees lower than a male’s enclosure, this can have an effect on egg production. Also, by reducing feeding amounts and frequency, you can also reduce the size and frequency of clutches. It doesn’t always work, but is definitely recommended as egg production can do a number on the ladies. Some will even use liquid calcium as part of the routine. Hopefully some will chime in with what has worked for them.
 

Tonyww93

Established Member
Yep imo thats a female ciz the no spurs and the color patterns. Its a cutie tho! My lady is no where near that bright she likes to stay a dull green coloring
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
Controlling the diet and the temperatures seems to control the number of eggs laid but it's not an exact science. Part of the problem is that it seems to need to start just a bit before the chameleon reaches the receptive phase of her cycle for the first time...and there's no way for the average chameleon keeper to determine exactly when this will happen.

What we are trying to do is make sure she has enough food to attain an adult size but then lower the feeding amount enough to stop her from preparing too many follicles for ovulation so she then won't produce a huge clutch. A clutch that is too big will put too big of a demand on nutrients needed to form the eggs.

Females veileds that are constantly overfed almost always develop MBD, prolapse, develop follicular stasis, etc. The follicles can rot inside them. They usually can't lay their eggs or retain eggs and die.

So what we do is slow the diet down as they approach adult size...first we cut the feedings to the same amount of food every second or third day and then decrease the amount of food fed at each, feeding until we get down to 4 or 5 crickets or equal caloric amount of other insects every two or three days. We also keep the basking temperature at 80F to slow their metabolism so they won't feel so hungry.

As I said...it's not an exact science, so some will produce the 2 dozen or so eggs we are aiming for and others may still have a bigger clutch than we would like. Some may even stop reproduction altogether. Those that still produce too many eggs can have their "diet" adjusted even lower. (Keep in mind that we want them to look healthy but not skinny or fat.)

Of course, it's still important that your husbandry is spot on...supplements being used properly, proper UVB light, etc.

Hope I didn't miss anything in this explanation.

Btw...it's also important to provide real non toxic plants in chameleon cages. Fake ones can lead to problems if the chameleon eats them.
 

JeneenDeAnne

New Member
Controlling the diet and the temperatures seems to control the number of eggs laid but it's not an exact science. Part of the problem is that it seems to need to start just a bit before the chameleon reaches the receptive phase of her cycle for the first time...and there's no way for the average chameleon keeper to determine exactly when this will happen.

What we are trying to do is make sure she has enough food to attain an adult size but then lower the feeding amount enough to stop her from preparing too many follicles for ovulation so she then won't produce a huge clutch. A clutch that is too big will put too big of a demand on nutrients needed to form the eggs.

Females veileds that are constantly overfed almost always develop MBD, prolapse, develop follicular stasis, etc. The follicles can rot inside them. They usually can't lay their eggs or retain eggs and die.

So what we do is slow the diet down as they approach adult size...first we cut the feedings to the same amount of food every second or third day and then decrease the amount of food fed at each, feeding until we get down to 4 or 5 crickets or equal caloric amount of other insects every two or three days. We also keep the basking temperature at 80F to slow their metabolism so they won't feel so hungry.

As I said...it's not an exact science, so some will produce the 2 dozen or so eggs we are aiming for and others may still have a bigger clutch than we would like. Some may even stop reproduction altogether. Those that still produce too many eggs can have their "diet" adjusted even lower. (Keep in mind that we want them to look healthy but not skinny or fat.)

Of course, it's still important that your husbandry is spot on...supplements being used properly, proper UVB light, etc.

Hope I didn't miss anything in this explanation.

Btw...it's also important to provide real non toxic plants in chameleon cages. Fake ones can lead to problems if the chameleon eats them.
Oh my gosh you have been a God send! Thank You!! After what you have explained it almost seems as if Ivy has been adjusting her own diet & temperature. However, I think I'll take over from here.
As far as the plants, I agree 100% & this enclosure is temporary. I have had a few plants in with her but I took them out while my son had her because neither him or his dad monitored her while eating & the first time I seen her grab a roach with dirt & debris stuck to her tongue I pulled them out. Now the she is with me I am making her enclosure that is at least 5ft tall to accommodate a Hibiscus plant (seems to be the only one appealing to her). But I have seen her fall a few times before going to the vet & thought it may be a good idea to form a "net" with branches to break falls so she don't land on the edge of the pots or straight to the floor. Not a fan of substrate after witnessing the dirty dubai roach LoL
Again, Thank You for all your advice & expertise 😊 I'm sure I'll be asking Many questions during my enclosure build (& possible redesign)
 

JeneenDeAnne

New Member
(Don't know how to edit last post yet🤣)
I am aware of the dangers these fake plants pose. Due to this I have observed her for hours upon hours (she is next to me in the dining room & we spend a whole lot of time just watching one another...could be how she has trained me so well!) And this girl has no interest in any type of vegetation aside from Hibiscus...so far. And she has a very odd way of drinking (??) One time I watched her "catch a drip" with her tongue but ever since that time she literally holds her mouth open Under the leaf as it drops down & a preference of at least 2 drops/second.
One more quick question : for calcium & multi-vitamin do you have a preference? I'm not a big fan of average "pet shop" brands
 

JeneenDeAnne

New Member
Yep imo thats a female ciz the no spurs and the color patterns. Its a cutie tho! My lady is no where near that bright she likes to stay a dull green coloring
Ivy stayed quite dull & dark while living at my sons house. With me she was getting outside while it was warm & her enclosure gets about 4 hours of morning sun. When I wake up I open everything up, pull down her plexiglass & turn on her humidity. After her morning refreshment she bops over to the sunshine & basks until it moves away 😊
She also gets a lot of fresh air & has an air purifier next to her. This gives me the ability to regulate temp & humidity but also guarantee her ventilation & purity. I'm actually considering using velcro (or something) along the edges of new enclosure to keep this ability with the plexi-glass. I'm new to chams so I don't know if these are factors playing into her color but I have noticed a significant difference since she has been with me.
All I know....I'm Loving Chams!! ❤🦎 So intriguing & simply fascinating! Watching Ivy has the same calming effect as watching my fish tank!
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
Many veiled females will start to munch on the leaves as they begin producing eggs...so I would get rid of all the fake ones soon. Also, many veiled females will eat sand and soil...so it's recommended to cover the soil in plant pots with big enough stones that they cannot possibly ingest them. I also use a specific sand for the egglaying bins because it has never caused any issues when ingested...no blockages, no eye infections, etc. It's produced by Kings and comes in a white bag that has yellow, blue red sand toys in the front. It's playsand, of course.

Regarding supplements...for many years I used Herptivite (twice a month lightly), RepCal calcium (every feeding but 4 a month lightly) and RepCal calcium with D3 (twice a month lightly). But nowadays there are lots of other ones that are as good or maybe even better.
Hopefully others will chime in about it.
 

Jpeff

Chameleon Enthusiast
You might want to fill this out to make sure you have every set right.

Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?

Current Problem - The current problem you are concerned about.

--------------

Please Note:
  1. The more details you provide the better and more accurate help you will receive.
  2. Photos can be very helpful.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hi and very glad that you’ve found your way here. :) I’ve been watching this thread and you’ve gotten advice from the very best, so no need for me to say anything. A couple of your comments though have made me wanting more info though and wonder if perhaps you would benefit from a full husbandry review.
her enclosure gets about 4 hours of morning sun. When I wake up I open everything up, pull down her plexiglass & turn on her humidity
I’m not sure if you’re aware or not that uvb from the sun doesn’t pass through glass and most things. I’m also wondering what you mean by “turn on her humidity”. What do you keep your humidity at?
Adding to @kinyonga post about supplements, I use Zoo Med ReptiCalcium without D3 lightly dusted at every feeding except one every other week, in which I use Zoo Med Reptivite with D3. This has been working well for my chameleons and me. Also, I feed all of my chameleons 3-4 feeders, 3 days a week. One of my veiled girls hasn’t laid eggs since Feb 2020 and my other lays just once a year. I keep my girls basking temps no higher than 80. @kinyonga ’s method has been working great for my girls. I also have a panther girl who is just over a year old and hasn’t laid eggs.
 

JeneenDeAnne

New Member
Hi and very glad that you’ve found your way here. :) I’ve been watching this thread and you’ve gotten advice from the very best, so no need for me to say anything. A couple of your comments though have made me wanting more info though and wonder if perhaps you would benefit from a full husbandry review.

I’m not sure if you’re aware or not that uvb from the sun doesn’t pass through glass and most things. I’m also wondering what you mean by “turn on her humidity”. What do you keep your humidity at?
Adding to @kinyonga post about supplements, I use Zoo Med ReptiCalcium without D3 lightly dusted at every feeding except one every other week, in which I use Zoo Med Reptivite with D3. This has been working well for my chameleons and me. Also, I feed all of my chameleons 3-4 feeders, 3 days a week. One of my veiled girls hasn’t laid eggs since Feb 2020 and my other lays just once a year. I keep my girls basking temps no higher than 80. @kinyonga ’s method has been working great for my girls. I also have a panther girl who is just over a year old and hasn’t laid eggs.
Good Morning 🌞 Fair questions & I am loving all the help & advise!
I am fully aware that glass & plexi glass block uvb & I know now that screen can also reduce the amount. I've had Ivy with me now approximately 4 weeks & her cage is temporary. When she got here I noticed how much she would Try to bask in the real sun so I started taking her entire enclosure out on my deck & pulled the plexi glass off (I have it velcroed so I have the ability to maintain steady temp/humidity but also give her complete ventilation & have the air purifier near her so shes not getting dusty or furry: 4cats & a wolf hybrid as well) so she could get as much pure sun as possible. However I live in Toledo Ohio & unfortunately it is now autumn & dang chilly already! 🙁 Needless to say she does not get my deck & that pure sunshine at the moment so I turn her heat & uvb on about 8am but still pull one panel off because she just Loves going over to the real sunlight. I actually came in these forums as a guest before I purchased her to make sure the pet shop didn't Try to sell me all the wrong items so I could give her an optimal enclosure. She IS in a prefab screen cage at the moment but everything I got her I discovered here & followed the advise. A few things I'm not happy with & becoming impatient: fake plants, the uvb bulb because it is the small coil 10.0...30w. I'm also upgrading her dripper because I made this one & it is not much to look at LoL
Aside from the bump on her nose she seems quit peaceful & healthy. Although she has Not been happy with actually taking the medicine 😁 I'm Still kissing up to her & purposely leaving the dining room after I get her going in the morning....I do put a towel over 2 sides of her cage at night so the night lights don't throw her rhythm off.
Hope I didn't forget anything..& I'm working on the husbandry questionnaire😊
 

JeneenDeAnne

New Member
Good Morning 🌞 Fair questions & I am loving all the help & advise!
I am fully aware that glass & plexi glass block uvb & I know now that screen can also reduce the amount. I've had Ivy with me now approximately 4 weeks & her cage is temporary. When she got here I noticed how much she would Try to bask in the real sun so I started taking her entire enclosure out on my deck & pulled the plexi glass off (I have it velcroed so I have the ability to maintain steady temp/humidity but also give her complete ventilation & have the air purifier near her so shes not getting dusty or furry: 4cats & a wolf hybrid as well) so she could get as much pure sun as possible. However I live in Toledo Ohio & unfortunately it is now autumn & dang chilly already! 🙁 Needless to say she does not get my deck & that pure sunshine at the moment so I turn her heat & uvb on about 8am but still pull one panel off because she just Loves going over to the real sunlight. I actually came in these forums as a guest before I purchased her to make sure the pet shop didn't Try to sell me all the wrong items so I could give her an optimal enclosure. She IS in a prefab screen cage at the moment but everything I got her I discovered here & followed the advise. A few things I'm not happy with & becoming impatient: fake plants, the uvb bulb because it is the small coil 10.0...30w. I'm also upgrading her dripper because I made this one & it is not much to look at LoL
Aside from the bump on her nose she seems quit peaceful & healthy. Although she has Not been happy with actually taking the medicine 😁 I'm Still kissing up to her & purposely leaving the dining room after I get her going in the morning....I do put a towel over 2 sides of her cage at night so the night lights don't throw her rhythm off.
Hope I didn't forget anything..& I'm working on the husbandry questionnaire😊
Oh boy, I missed one...I keep her humidity between 60-80%. Higher end she sheds.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Oh boy, I missed one...I keep her humidity between 60-80%. Higher end she sheds.
You’ll want to lower this to between 30-50% during the day. Chameleons are dry shedders, so having the humidity too high can interfere. I keep my panthers and veileds in the same room and struggle to keep the humidity at a compromising 40-50%, which is a bit low for the panthers and a bit high for the veiled. While my panthers have no problem shedding, all of my veileds don’t have clean sheds.
The other and primary issue with having your humidity too high is risk of respiratory infection. High heat + high humidity is a recipe for that.
A few things I'm not happy with & becoming impatient: fake plants, the uvb bulb because it is the small coil 10.0...30w. I'm also upgrading her dripper because I made this one & it is not much to look at
It often takes a bit of time to get everything just right. However, the uvb bulb is a priority to upgrade. The coil screw in bulbs have no gradient or range. They only provide the needed uv index of 3.0 at about 2” away and at that distance, the risk for burns is very high. You’ll want a linear T5 fixture with either ReptiSun 5.0 or Arcadia 6% uvb bulb. Then you will need a distance of 8-9” between basking area and lights for that ideal 3.0 uvi.
What some of us do to get the most plants for our $$, is buy the bushiest pothos you can find and then split it into at least 2-3 individual plants. Although not on the lists, philodendron can also be used - has the same ‘toxic’ properties as pothos.
I wouldn’t worry about a fancy dripper. Often the simpler diy drippers work better than the commercial. The control valve of the big/little dripper is very hard to control and I would suggest putting your $$ towards something else.
 

JeneenDeAnne

New Member
You’ll want to lower this to between 30-50% during the day. Chameleons are dry shedders, so having the humidity too high can interfere. I keep my panthers and veileds in the same room and struggle to keep the humidity at a compromising 40-50%, which is a bit low for the panthers and a bit high for the veiled. While my panthers have no problem shedding, all of my veileds don’t have clean sheds.
The other and primary issue with having your humidity too high is risk of respiratory infection. High heat + high humidity is a recipe for that.

It often takes a bit of time to get everything just right. However, the uvb bulb is a priority to upgrade. The coil screw in bulbs have no gradient or range. They only provide the needed uv index of 3.0 at about 2” away and at that distance, the risk for burns is very high. You’ll want a linear T5 fixture with either ReptiSun 5.0 or Arcadia 6% uvb bulb. Then you will need a distance of 8-9” between basking area and lights for that ideal 3.0 uvi.
What some of us do to get the most plants for our $$, is buy the bushiest pothos you can find and then split it into at least 2-3 individual plants. Although not on the lists, philodendron can also be used - has the same ‘toxic’ properties as pothos.
I wouldn’t worry about a fancy dripper. Often the simpler diy drippers work better than the commercial. The control valve of the big/little dripper is very hard to control and I would suggest putting your $$ towards something else.
Thank You! 😊 I've read so much about the humidity level zone & there were so many contradictions I had no idea what to follow. So Thank You! I'll take the advise of the pros over "articles" Any day!! I am actually going today to upgrade her lighting & get some more dubai roaches. So that will be proper in a couple hours 😁 The light is a bit large for the current enclosure but it is temporary & I'm going to hang it from the ceiling rather than set it directly on the cage which will also give me the ability to adjust the height. I may be able to find a few plants today but if I fail today I will go to the greenhouse tomorrow!
And Again Thank You....Thank All of You😊🦎
 
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