Metal Halide Lighting - Need Advice

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
Foreign language for me trying to figure out how to convert those numbers... If you get time can you post the UVI numbers for those of us that have a solarmeter 6.5 these are what we are used to reading.
Its 35-45 to 1 ratio. The generic conversion is 40:1. Its impossible to do a straight conversion like C to F
 

Goose502

Chameleon Enthusiast
No, that's an index meter and what I got is strictly a UVB meter. It's made by an instrument company out of Shanghai.
The 6.2 is Solarmeters UVB meter. I use a 6.5(UVI). I went with that as it seems to now be considered the industry standard. I did not know their was a mathematical conversion though, very interesting.
 
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iMi

Established Member
40:1 to convert to uvi. Uvi should be around .5. uW/cm2 should be around 35. Its hard to do a direct conversion since each manufacture has their own formula, and uvi/UVB changes with the seasons and time of day.


Still looks like a good setup, Mid tank is the recomended min, an 8" is like 2.5 uvi, which is semi shade, 6.5 is full sun.
Spot on. That's what I've gathered. There is a research paper discussing it. I'll try to find it. Basically 350 uW/cm2 would be mid-day full sun in temperate climate. Minimums for vitamin D production I've seen are somewhere between 35-100, if I understand correctly. Still learning about this topic. It's quite interesting.
 

iMi

Established Member
The 6.2 is Solarmeters UVB meter. I use a 6.5(UVI). I went with that as it seems to now be considered the industry standard. I did not know their was a mathematical conversion though, very interesting.
I asked them to send me UVB meter and that's what I've got. :) Now that I looked up the Solarmeter 6.2, I can confirm that is exactly the same product. In fact, I think it's made in their factory. The concern with metal halide for me is mainly the degradation of output. I don't think you can really overexpose the chameleon to UVB because if the setup is correct, the animal will have access to full shade. They seem to regulate their own exposure just fine. So, this being the sole source of light, heat and UVB, I want to be able to measure the output over time.
 

Goose502

Chameleon Enthusiast
I asked them to send me UVB meter and that's what I've got. :) Now that I looked up the Solarmeter 6.2, I can confirm that is exactly the same product. In fact, I think it's made in their factory. The concern with metal halide for me is mainly the degradation of output. I don't think you can really overexpose the chameleon to UVB because if the setup is correct, the animal will have access to full shade. They seem to regulate their own exposure just fine. So, this being the sole source of light, heat and UVB, I want to be able to measure the output over time.
I think overexposure is possible, but that involves very high levels of UVB, along with other spectrums. The UVI gives a more rounded value for overall UV exposure(all wavelengths), at least I think. Either method, measuring is by far the best way to provide safe exposure, and catch degradation over time.
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
A 6.2 is for measuring exposure to uvb and uvc that humans should not be exposed to. AKA an industrial environment or to check if a tanning bed went bad.
A 6.5 is for measuring exposure to uva and uvb that humans should be exposed to. Its for measuring how long skin can be exposed without causing damage, and how much exposure is necessary for bone growth(like alaska).

Ideally you want the 6.5 or UVI meter. You can get by just fine with a 6.2, but it does have a few issues. The 6.2 gets more sensitives as the wave lengths get closer to non terrestrial/ nasty. A 6.2 would go nuts when measuring those first gen CFLs that were causing eye and skin damage to reptiles due to the huge amount of uvc they were putting out. A 6.5 odds are would not pick it up. However a 6.2 can also say "reading are perfect for your reptile" when really there is almost no output in the D3 production zone, but a lot of output in the deep uvb zone. A 6.5 can not be tricked, its designed to measure the D3 zone and the UVA skin damage zone.

So if you want to measure natural light(or artificially made natural light) you want a 6.5. If you want to know if you are being exposed to nasty stuff, get a 6.2.
 

iMi

Established Member
A 6.2 is for measuring exposure to uvb and uvc that humans should not be exposed to. AKA an industrial environment or to check if a tanning bed went bad.
A 6.5 is for measuring exposure to uva and uvb that humans should be exposed to. Its for measuring how long skin can be exposed without causing damage, and how much exposure is necessary for bone growth(like alaska).

Ideally you want the 6.5 or UVI meter. You can get by just fine with a 6.2, but it does have a few issues. The 6.2 gets more sensitives as the wave lengths get closer to non terrestrial/ nasty. A 6.2 would go nuts when measuring those first gen CFLs that were causing eye and skin damage to reptiles due to the huge amount of uvc they were putting out. A 6.5 odds are would not pick it up. However a 6.2 can also say "reading are perfect for your reptile" when really there is almost no output in the D3 production zone, but a lot of output in the deep uvb zone. A 6.5 can not be tricked, its designed to measure the D3 zone and the UVA skin damage zone.

So if you want to measure natural light(or artificially made natural light) you want a 6.5. If you want to know if you are being exposed to nasty stuff, get a 6.2.
Very informative. I will need to pick up the 6.5 as well.
 
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