Jackson's Care/General Info

Jabba93

Established Member
To all the Jackson's chameleon owners,

I have never met any of you! Hello! I am creating this thread mostly because I would just like to know more about your chams. Where I am in Florida the chams being sold locally or with breeders are usually veiled or a few panthers. I have seen maybe 2 Jackson's and no one has given me any solid info about them.

What is their care like compared to a veiled?

I've been told they're a lot more sensitive or fragile than most chameleons. Is this true?

Are there any additional health problems or concerns when choosing a Jackson? Do those horns have to be trimmed like claws on other animals?

Any info on Care or just General information on Jackson's would be appreciated. I'm not looking to buy one, just expand my knowledge.

Thanks!
 

Graves923

Chameleon Enthusiast
https://www.chameleonforums.com/care/caresheets/jacksons/

Jacksons are a montane species so they prefer alittle bit cooler temps and higher humidity than veileds and panthers. They also require a more specific supplement routine. In comparison to veileds and panthers, Jacksons chams can be easily over dosed on D3 if the keeper has not done proper research before hand.

Very cool species but I would not recommend them to new chameleon keepers.
 

Jabba93

Established Member
https://www.chameleonforums.com/care/caresheets/jacksons/

Jacksons are a montane species so they prefer alittle bit cooler temps and higher humidity than veileds and panthers. They also require a more specific supplement routine. In comparison to veileds and panthers, Jacksons chams can be easily over dosed on D3 if the keeper has not done proper research before hand.

Very cool species but I would not recommend them to new chameleon keepers.

Thanks Graves! I knew they weren't for beginners, but I never knew why. Makes more sense now!
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
If you plan on owning a Jackson's there are things you have to have that you might be able to scrape by without for other species. You will need a good misting system like Mistking or Climist. You will need a drainage system to handle the runoff from the misting system because you will mist more than for other species. You may need an ultrasonic cool mist humidifier if your house doesn't stay humid at night. You will need to maintain a cage full of live plants. You may need to run a dripper as well depending on how well they drink. Jackson's do best with an over night temperature drop into the 60's. That can mean running your AC or placing ice packs on the cage at night above the sleeping spot. Not overheating them during the day is also important. You have to really understand their supplement schedule and dust very lightly to not over do it.
It's a bit of extra work but I think they are worth it.
 

Jabba93

Established Member
If you plan on owning a Jackson's there are things you have to have that you might be able to scrape by without for other species. You will need a good misting system like Mistking or Climist. You will need a drainage system to handle the runoff from the misting system because you will mist more than for other species. You may need an ultrasonic cool mist humidifier if your house doesn't stay humid at night. You will need to maintain a cage full of live plants. You may need to run a dripper as well depending on how well they drink. Jackson's do best with an over night temperature drop into the 60's. That can mean running your AC or placing ice packs on the cage at night above the sleeping spot. Not overheating them during the day is also important. You have to really understand their supplement schedule and dust very lightly to not over do it.
It's a bit of extra work but I think they are worth it.


Gotcha! Thanks for the info!
 

NickTide

Avid Member
some additional info for any species..... Feeder variety is possibly the most over looked part of husbandry. Do lots of research and learn to keep (or buy if you're rich) at least 4 varieties.... preferably more. And like Jacksjill said, lots of live pants. That makes keeping the humidity up waaaaaaay easier.
 

Mattmoo360

New Member
Also don't let anyone sell you a juvenile less than six months old. They don't handle the stress of relocating well below that age and many don't live to the six month mark.

Uh oh... I was sold mine at 3 months old.. now I'm worried...
 
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