Id my cham please

Brad Ramsey

Retired Moderator
I am no expert at identifying chameleons that I do not have experience with but my guess is that you have a Senegal Chameleon.
Google it and see what you think.

-Brad
 

Aquaseafoam

New Member
thanks for the replies!
Judging from your link Chris, I don't see where Commons have any specific requirements as far as chameleons go. What I mean is, is it safe to assume I can take housing/feeding info from any respectable chameleon site (like one tailored to veileds)? Information dedicated to this species seems lacking.
Also, I have had him for two weeks but i haven't noticed him eat. There are appropriately sized crickets running around the cage, I just haven't witnessed him eating. He does drink and move about the cage though. When he stretches out he seems skinny, I can see his ribs.. should I be worried about him eating enough? Besides crickets, i have ordered butter worms and should receive them soon.
 

Brad Ramsey

Retired Moderator
Do you count your crickets?
When I was free range feeding I would count the # I put in in the morning and do a recount at night when I chased them down to remove them.
I don't believe in letting free range feeders stay in the enclosure at night for cham safety reasons.
This way I could get a fairly accurate count of what was eaten that day, although I would find the occasional cricket in the morning that I had missed.
I have since switched to using a feeder cup which makes the job much easier.

-Brad
 

Aquaseafoam

New Member
Good news! I witnessed him eating today. He was a little peeved by the misting tonight, and went to the bottom of the cage and snatched up two crickets! It was almost like he was taking out his frustration on them.. lol.
I don't remove the crickets at night, but he sleeps on an umbrella plant stem that goes to the top of the cage, and I've never seen the crickets up there thankfully. Once these guys are gone, and when the butter worms arrive I will be using a feeding cup. I just don't know if I can pinch off one of the crickets legs :eek:
 

Brad Ramsey

Retired Moderator
You don't need to.
I have had minimal escapes from my feeder and I don't remove any legs.
The cool thing about the rare occasion when a cricket gets out is that the cham gets super excited about hunting down the loose insect.
You can see how I made my feeder on the raising kitty blog.

-Brad
 
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