husbantry help for veiled chameleon please

tdeamicis

Member
Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care? Veiled chameleon, female, got her at 6 weeks old from breeder, her name is Pez
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon? daily - multiple times a week, depending on her mood
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders? Dubai roaches, superworms, wax worms, horn worms. She tends to eat between daily and every other day. We typically will feed her about 2 dubai roaches and 1-3 superworms a day. Dubai roaches we breed here, fed vegetables, watered, the babies especially love to eat Fluker's High Calcium cricket diet. Superworms are fed vegetables. Wax worms and horned worms are occasional and fed when we get them.
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule? we daily dust the feeder roaches (once she perks up and we know she is going to eat) with Zoo Med ReptiCalcium + D3 (will use this bi-monthly). We will occasionally dust the superworms with this as well, but it is sometimes hard to guess how much she wants to eat. I need to get the calcium phosphorus free no d3 to add to her daily feeders.
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking? spray bottle misting live plants, every morning and night, with the bulk of the spraying in the morning, more of a light misting at nighttime. We see her drinking quite often and I will spray a little more when I see her actively getting excited about the water to make sure she gets enough.
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites? Typically brown and white urates, but the bioactive enclosure cleans that up pretty quickly. Pez had a large dropping yesterday, very large and brown. A little abnormal for her, but I am not sure if that is a big problem or not. Not tested yet, but have a vet visit set up after her sister passed today.
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you. We got her at 6 weeks old and have played and held her since the beginning.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions? homemade cage, made out of wood (back and two sides) and screen (top and front). The dimensions are approximately 6 feet tall, 1.5 feet deep and 5 feet wide, but Pez only has access to the left side of this cage. Her sister had the other side, so they each have 6 feet tall, 1.5 feet deep and 2.5 feet wide.
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule? We have a Zoo Med ReptiSun T5 hood over the cage, with a Zoo Med ReptiSun 10.0 UVB T5HO 54W 46" bulb.
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps? I don't have this recorded, but will determine that today and share my update. We have a temperature/humity reader, but I don't record the levels usually and I don't want to state the wrong temp.
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity? humidity is around 45-60% depending on when I check, and obviously near the plants the humidity can get higher, near 70%, so it depends on where she is. Creating that by having a bioactive cage, with live plants and misting twice a day at least. Have a temperature/humidity level reader in the cage that we use to measure humidity.
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind? yes, pothos/ivy, boston fern, bromeliads
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor? cage is near the front door, as that is where the cage fits for now. There is a walkway there that we use to get to the bedrooms, but we are just a family of four, so it isn't super high traffic, though we are all at home lately, but this is consistant and we've always done this since we have had the chameleons.
  • Location - Where are you geographically located? DFW, Texas

Current Problem - The current problem you are concerned about. Wanting to see how the cage looks, what you think about my husbantry to see if there is anything I need to change/adjust/be concerned about.
 

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tdeamicis

Member
Based on my current readings, looks like the cage top/basking temp is around 90-91 degrees and the bottom of the cage is around 76-80 degrees.
I will find out the overnight bottom of the cage temp tonight and will share that tomorrow.
 

Flick boy

Chameleon Enthusiast
So I already mentioned supplements in the other thread calcium phosphorus free no d3 every feed then twice a month multivitamin +d3. Humidity is a bit high 30/50%daytime for veileds you could add a dripper and spray a bit less . Wired probes are best you will want the one at basking to be at the height that your girls back is ( as I mentioned to high temperatures and too much food ) makes your girl develop a higher number of eggs putting strain on her body and possibly shortening her life span. All worms mentioned are and only be used as treats. Charts added i keep a daily record this not only helps you keep track of feeding ,supplements but in the event of needing a vet you have records
 

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tdeamicis

Member
78 degrees for basking. That seems awfully low, especially looking everywhere online (that says 85-90).
Not trying to be rude, but what makes you think that 78 degrees is good for basking?
All commercial documentation and the general consensus online is much higher...

And yes, all worms are definitely more treats. The roaches are the main feeder for Pez.
Of course we do moths as often as we can get them, worms are when she wants them (she doesn't always eat them).
 

Mountain Dragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
78 degrees for basking. That seems awfully low, especially looking everywhere online (that says 85-90).
Not trying to be rude, but what makes you think that 78 degrees is good for basking?
All commercial documentation and the general consensus online is much higher...

And yes, all worms are definitely more treats. The roaches are the main feeder for Pez.
Of course we do moths as often as we can get them, worms are when she wants them (she doesn't always eat them).
78 is a good temp.
 

tdeamicis

Member
Since she is in a large cage, we are planning to open it up and allow her access to the full cage. I plan on letting it sit a while and cleaning it before giving her access. Do you have any suggestions on the best way to do this?
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
78 degrees for basking. That seems awfully low, especially looking everywhere online (that says 85-90).
Not trying to be rude, but what makes you think that 78 degrees is good for basking?
All commercial documentation and the general consensus online is much higher...

And yes, all worms are definitely more treats. The roaches are the main feeder for Pez.
Of course we do moths as often as we can get them, worms are when she wants them (she doesn't always eat them).
Reduced feeding amounts and temps control clutch size. If your are keeping females hot with increased food they are going to lay much larger clutches impacting their health and increasing their risk of becoming eggbound which in turn can lead to death without proper vet treatment. This is something that has been more popular the last few years as more and more people are seeing healthier females living long lives vs those living short lives due to egg laying complications. Old way of thought was keeping them hotter. Even with males we are reducing temps to max 85 to prolong lifespan.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
I keep the basking temperature at 80F for female veiled chameleons.

If you overfeed them as they approach maturity and keep the temperatures too high, you will put her in the position of producing a large clutch of eggs. (They produce eggs without being mated, once they are mature depending on the husbandry.)

Improper husbandry may also lead to follicular stasis, egg binding, MBD, prolapses and other health issues.
 

Mountain Dragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care? Veiled chameleon, female, got her at 6 weeks old from breeder, her name is Pez
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon? daily - multiple times a week, depending on her mood
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders? Dubai roaches, superworms, wax worms, horn worms. She tends to eat between daily and every other day. We typically will feed her about 2 dubai roaches and 1-3 superworms a day. Dubai roaches we breed here, fed vegetables, watered, the babies especially love to eat Fluker's High Calcium cricket diet. Superworms are fed vegetables. Wax worms and horned worms are occasional and fed when we get them.
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule? we daily dust the feeder roaches (once she perks up and we know she is going to eat) with Zoo Med ReptiCalcium + D3 (will use this bi-monthly). We will occasionally dust the superworms with this as well, but it is sometimes hard to guess how much she wants to eat. I need to get the calcium phosphorus free no d3 to add to her daily feeders.
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking? spray bottle misting live plants, every morning and night, with the bulk of the spraying in the morning, more of a light misting at nighttime. We see her drinking quite often and I will spray a little more when I see her actively getting excited about the water to make sure she gets enough.
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites? Typically brown and white urates, but the bioactive enclosure cleans that up pretty quickly. Pez had a large dropping yesterday, very large and brown. A little abnormal for her, but I am not sure if that is a big problem or not. Not tested yet, but have a vet visit set up after her sister passed today.
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you. We got her at 6 weeks old and have played and held her since the beginning.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions? homemade cage, made out of wood (back and two sides) and screen (top and front). The dimensions are approximately 6 feet tall, 1.5 feet deep and 5 feet wide, but Pez only has access to the left side of this cage. Her sister had the other side, so they each have 6 feet tall, 1.5 feet deep and 2.5 feet wide.
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule? We have a Zoo Med ReptiSun T5 hood over the cage, with a Zoo Med ReptiSun 10.0 UVB T5HO 54W 46" bulb.
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps? I don't have this recorded, but will determine that today and share my update. We have a temperature/humity reader, but I don't record the levels usually and I don't want to state the wrong temp.
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity? humidity is around 45-60% depending on when I check, and obviously near the plants the humidity can get higher, near 70%, so it depends on where she is. Creating that by having a bioactive cage, with live plants and misting twice a day at least. Have a temperature/humidity level reader in the cage that we use to measure humidity.
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind? yes, pothos/ivy, boston fern, bromeliads
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor? cage is near the front door, as that is where the cage fits for now. There is a walkway there that we use to get to the bedrooms, but we are just a family of four, so it isn't super high traffic, though we are all at home lately, but this is consistant and we've always done this since we have had the chameleons.
  • Location - Where are you geographically located? DFW, Texas

Current Problem - The current problem you are concerned about. Wanting to see how the cage looks, what you think about my husbantry to see if there is anything I need to change/adjust/be concerned about.
Do you have a lay bin also you could take down the wall and let her have the full cage since the other passed

edit: oop didn’t see that u said u might open it up
 

tdeamicis

Member
Reduced feeding amounts and temps control clutch size. If your are keeping females hot with increased food they are going to lay much larger clutches impacting their health and increasing their risk of becoming eggbound which in turn can lead to death without proper vet treatment. This is something that has been more popular the last few years as more and more people are seeing healthier females living long lives vs those living short lives due to egg laying complications. Old way of thought was keeping them hotter. Even with males we are reducing temps to max 85 to prolong lifespan.
I totally get that, I was just thinking it would be nice to see documentation on this. It seems like so far this is just what people on a forum say. And not saying this isn't credible, but man, it is just so hard for people to take care of an animal when all the information about raising them is wrong... :( I can't imagine trying to help so many people so often. It has to get so hard on your heart... :(
 

Mountain Dragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
I totally get that, I was just thinking it would be nice to see documentation on this. It seems like so far this is just what people on a forum say. And not saying this isn't credible, but man, it is just so hard for people to take care of an animal when all the information about raising them is wrong... :( I can't imagine trying to help so many people so often. It has to get so hard on your heart... :(
For me it’s very fun
 

tdeamicis

Member
Do you have a lay bin also you could take down the wall and let her have the full cage since the other passed

edit: oop didn’t see that u said u might open it up
I am not going to add a lay bin. The entire substrate is her lay bin.
And yes, definitely going to remove the wall in between. It was just up to separate the two females. And is up still to ensure we don't give anything to the remaining female.
 

Mountain Dragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
My biggest issue right now is determining how to attach long branches (they each need to be more than 5 feet long).
Well once you get branches long enough there’s the hanging garden method on chameleon academy donkesh does a great one and dragon strand ledges are a good way and fishing line
 
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