How to gutload bugs for your chameleon - YouTube video

Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
Learn what gutloading is, how often to gutload, and what ingredients you should feed to your bugs before feeding them to your chameleon. Feel free to check out my other videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3n4S2GRkOGfk2U8-xhaw6Q/



Good ingredients to use for gutloading: mustard greens, turnip greens, dandelion leaves, collard greens, escarole lettuce, papaya, watercress and alfalfa
Sort of good things to use for gutloading: sweet potato, carrots, oranges, mango, butternut squash, kale, apples, beet greens, blackberries, bok choy and green beans
Dry ingredients to use: bee pollen, organic non-salted sunflower seeds, spirulina, dried seaweed, flax seed and organic non-salted almonds
Bad things to use for gutloading: potatoes, cabbage, iceberg lettuce, romaine lettuce, spinach, broccoli, tomatoes, corn, grains, beans, oats, bread, cereal, meat, eggs, dog food, cat food, fish food, canned or dead insects, and vertebrates
 

JoXie411

Chameleon Enthusiast
What's the thought process behind using organic fruits and veggies? Same reasons why humans eat organic?
Like I explained in my original post organic / pesticide free, witch means there are not added chemicals that could kill your insects. Remember these insects are going into your reptile. Why would you give them radiated food? Food for thought
 

Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
Like I explained in my original post organic / pesticide free, witch means there are not added chemicals that could kill your insects. Remember these insects are going into your reptile. Why would you give them radiated food? Food for thought

Right. I was just trying to see if there was another reason besides the obvious. Sounds like it's the same reason why humans would buy organic for themselves. Unfortunately, pesticides are still used in organically produced food. The only way to 100% guarantee your produce isn't being exposed to chemicals would be to grow it yourself. Kind of a bummer :/

Not trying to stir up any sort of ethical debate when it comes to organic foods, but I found this article you might find interesting: https://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com/what-do-natural-organic-and-non-gmo-actually-mean

Some impactful excerpts:
"Organic does not mean pesticide free or chemical free. To be certified organic, a farmer must allow a previously non-organic field to be used without synthetic chemicals, pesticides, or GMOs for at least three years. Naturally based pesticides are used regularly. (A list of exempted chemicals is available on the USDA website). Though the USDA claims that these chemicals do not affect or alter the foods we eat, the fact remains that they are in many of our organic foods without our knowledge."

Also this "Methyl bromide has been banned from agricultural use, with a few exceptions, due to its association with a rise in prostate cancer in farm workers. Yet, it is one of many chemicals approved for use in organic production by the National Organic Standards Board."

Another great article: https://citygreens.in/2018/03/20/organic-debate-pesticides-organic-food/

"That pesticides of Organic origin are safer is one of the most widely accepted myth, even in regulatory circles. It is surprising that unlike for inorganic pesticides, there are limited guidelines or monitoring for usage of Organic pesticides. It is a foolhardy belief ignoring most available cues in nature all around us. The most of the deadliest known poisons to humans are of Organic origin. One of the Organic pesticides, ‘Rotenone,’ the use of which went unregulated for almost three decades, and was considered safe for Organic application, was finally banned in the US after it was found to be deadly to humans."
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Right. I was just trying to see if there was another reason besides the obvious. Sounds like it's the same reason why humans would buy organic for themselves. Unfortunately, pesticides are still used in organically produced food. The only way to 100% guarantee your produce isn't being exposed to chemicals would be to grow it yourself. Kind of a bummer :/

Not trying to stir up any sort of ethical debate when it comes to organic foods, but I found this article you might find interesting: https://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com/what-do-natural-organic-and-non-gmo-actually-mean

Some impactful excerpts:
"Organic does not mean pesticide free or chemical free. To be certified organic, a farmer must allow a previously non-organic field to be used without synthetic chemicals, pesticides, or GMOs for at least three years. Naturally based pesticides are used regularly. (A list of exempted chemicals is available on the USDA website). Though the USDA claims that these chemicals do not affect or alter the foods we eat, the fact remains that they are in many of our organic foods without our knowledge."

Also this "Methyl bromide has been banned from agricultural use, with a few exceptions, due to its association with a rise in prostate cancer in farm workers. Yet, it is one of many chemicals approved for use in organic production by the National Organic Standards Board."

Another great article: https://citygreens.in/2018/03/20/organic-debate-pesticides-organic-food/

"That pesticides of Organic origin are safer is one of the most widely accepted myth, even in regulatory circles. It is surprising that unlike for inorganic pesticides, there are limited guidelines or monitoring for usage of Organic pesticides. It is a foolhardy belief ignoring most available cues in nature all around us. The most of the deadliest known poisons to humans are of Organic origin. One of the Organic pesticides, ‘Rotenone,’ the use of which went unregulated for almost three decades, and was considered safe for Organic application, was finally banned in the US after it was found to be deadly to humans."
I think the point that she was making since you are doing a video for other new keepers is to make sure your covering all aspects like buying organic food for gutload or growing your own. Letting them know that this is an option and why. While it may not be something you believe in doing with your gutload some other experienced keepers do. It is important especially when we give info to others as someone that "knows" what is correct that we provide all aspects we can to properly educate them. :)
 

Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
I think the point that she was making since you are doing a video for other new keepers is to make sure your covering all aspects like buying organic food for gutload or growing your own. Letting them know that this is an option and why. While it may not be something you believe in doing with your gutload some other experienced keepers do. It is important especially when we give info to others as someone that "knows" what is correct that we provide all aspects we can to properly educate them. :)

Totally get it. It just didn't cross my mind to mention while I was filming. It gets nerve wracking to stand up in front of a camera and start talking. Feels like my brain turns to mush haha I did make the edit to mention using organic in the description of the video.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Totally get it. It just didn't cross my mind to mention while I was filming. It gets nerve wracking to stand up in front of a camera and start talking. Feels like my brain turns to mush haha I did make the edit to mention using organic in the description of the video.
I understand... It is just a whole picture sort of thing. They are looking at your video as you being an authority. Think back to when you knew nothing and watched something or read something. It is hard to know what is right or wrong. It is why I always red line an entire help form rather then giving bits and pieces of the information. I feel if they take the time to fill it out then I should take the time to give thoughtful advice.

I do really like that your linking the videos back to the forum. So that if people need additional help they can get it. :)
 
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RyanBRZ

Avid Member
I think it pretty much goes without saying that organic is ideal.. this applies for yourself, your kids, your pets, your bugs, etc. Maybe add a line below the body of text under the video, 'Buy organic when possible'. Good job on the video
 

Gingero

Chameleon Enthusiast
I think it pretty much goes without saying that organic is ideal.. this applies to yourself, your kids, your pets, your bugs, etc. Maybe add a line below the body of text under the video, 'Buy organic when possible'

Yeah I already added text about buying organic in the description box of the video. I don't buy organic even for myself, so it just didn't even cross my mind. That's why I have you guys to remind me :)
 

GoodKarma19

Chameleon Enthusiast
I don't buy organic even for myself, so it just didn't even cross my mind

100% me, right there! I only ever consider organic for my birds, and now the bugs. If I can get it at a reasonable price, awesome! If not, well... I'm a broke student, and if it's good enough for me to eat my "kids" are just going to have to deal! :notworthy:
 

RyanBRZ

Avid Member

GoodKarma19

Chameleon Enthusiast
I personally buy organic apples and banana's every week for breakfast, but that's about it, I honestly think it's a scam and it's rarely legitimately organic.

I think it's cost effective to buy organic for gutloading if you make gel cubes that you freeze. You can make it last a long time and almost none would go to waste.

I followed this video using these trays: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07GJQFYJM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Fair enough, and nice selection! It's almost time for me to whip up my next batch of frozen gutload... this weekend, I figure!

Yeah, organic is largely just out of my price range and I dont quite trust it. I so buy lots of local produce, though - I live in an agriculture heavy sector, and it'd be a real shame if I didn't take advantage of it!
 
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