Gutload

jmart

Member
Hi,

I have been reading the past threads about tongue problems (cham aiming but tongue going too high), as I have a problem with a couple of mine.

This is the gutload I use for the crickets:
rice baby cereal, bee pollen, wheat germ, brewers yeast and kelp. I also give them oranges, carrots and "spring mix" salad. Is there enough vitamin B in this?
The threads said that tongue problems were mostly from a lack of this vitamin. Maybe the 2 that are showing this problem need more vitamins than my others?
I am supplementing the same as everyone on here with Rep-Cal with/without D3 and Herptivite. I also give Reptivite to the panthers every 2 weeks for the vitamin A.
I was thinking of trying to "dust" the insects with crushed vitamin B pills (just for the 2) and see if it improves.
They also get supers, hornworms and silkworms.

Is there something else going on, in your opinion? there is no evidence of MBD (except in 1 rescue that I got that way)

Thank You
 

jojackson

New Member
Please begin by providing as much info as possible, this will save you being asked the same questions one by one /over and over from now till xmas.
please type your answers between. :)



Chameleon Info:
Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:
Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
Location - Where are you geographically located?

Current Problem - The current problem you are concerned about.


Pictures are helpful
 
How do you feed the insects? Size of cage used? I'm of the opinion that chameleons can do damage to their tongues within cramped spaces, over time. Tongues are shot out and not full expanded, or they hit the screen cage with such force that injuries occur over time.

I try to add insects to a corner with distants away from the chameleon or add feeder to natural items like branches and leaves, when possible.
 

jmart

Member
Oustaleti M, wild-caught, in my care 1 yr. (young adult-15 ")
Panther M, captive, in my care 5 months (6 months old)
no handling
They get superworms 2x week, and silkworms or hornworms 1 x week, crickets on other days. The gut load was already posted for crickets.
Supplementing RepCal without D3 3x week, with D3 1x week (in winter) and Herptivite every 2 weeks, Reptivite every 2 weeks for panther only.
I do not put supplements on anything but the crickets, which they get 3 x week. They are fasted 1 day.
They are not handled, Oustalet hand fed, panther cup fed
Misted daily and dripped on leaves. Dripped directly on head every 2 days by hand.
Feces are brown with white urates.
Screen cages 4ftx 2.5 ftx2.5 ft.
Lighting UVB linear bulb exoterra 5.0 for Oustalet, Mega Ray UVB for panther. They go outside in summer for 16 hrs week.
Temps 85 basking spot and down to 68 at night.
Pothos in panther cage, plastic in oustalet cage.
They are in rooms that door is closed so cats cannot bother them.
 

jojackson

New Member
How do you feed the insects? Size of cage used? I'm of the opinion that chameleons can do damage to their tongues within cramped spaces, over time. Tongues are shot out and not full expanded, or they hit the screen cage with such force that injuries occur over time.

I try to add insects to a corner with distants away from the chameleon or add feeder to natural items like branches and leaves, when possible.
That makes sense but congruously I find from my experience, they get lazy, if thats an appropriate word. My guy prefers to get as close as possible before shooting, despite being able to hit bugs at full length.
Certainly plenty of space and nothing wrong with his eyesight either.
But it makes sense also that an opportunist feeder wants to be sure of its catch, who knows where/when the next meal will be?
 

jmart

Member
I forgot to mention that it happened over time. The panther, as a baby, had this problem occasionally, but the breeder could not help.
I just wanted to know if adding more vitamin B to the diet would be helpful. Otherwise, I will have to wait and see if it improves in the spring when they can go back outside.
I can't really let crickets loose as the screening is too large and they will get out.
The oustalet does poke his tongue at me whenever he sees me, because he always wants to eat.
I can't do pics right now as I need new equipment. this pc is really old.
 
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