(GRAPHIC CONTENT) Hungry bioactive cleaner crew: P. Scaber "Giant Orange" aggressive protein seekers!

A friend of mine, big in to Bio active substrates, seeded his substrate with these marvels (P. Scaber "Giant Orange"). They eat everything but absolutely love Protein!
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Pinky Rat after 24 hours.
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Pinky Rat after 48 hours! Wow, amazing!

I wonder how dangerous they could be to our Chameleons since they aggressively search day-and-night for high protein food sources.

Chameleon keepers be ware, potential danger!
 
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dshuld

Chameleon Enthusiast
While we're at it, here is the comparison shot from the giant canyon tub at 24 hrs. Pinky rats were about the same size when put in. The interesting thing for me is the p. dilatatus do a hell of a job as a c.u.c. as far as dead bugs and poo yet didn't hit the rat nearly at all. Both of the tubs have about 45 adults, 200+ babies and 100+ sub adults roughly.
 

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dshuld

Chameleon Enthusiast
I saved others their lunch, dinner, and breakfast :p

:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:, with all the bio active talk lately, hopefully it'll help some with their decisions though. Not sure if they are actiive here but Eli Castro and Shawn Kramer have some good posts on fb about what to use and what not to use. The first two pics are part of the reason p. scaber aren't recommended by either of them for c.u.c.'s.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:, with all the bio active talk lately, hopefully it'll help some with their decisions though. Not sure if they are actiive here but Eli Castro and Shawn Kramer have some good posts on fb about what to use and what not to use. The first two pics are part of the reason p. scaber aren't recommended by either of them for c.u.c.'s.
I totally understand the need for posting this. Absolutely will be great for the bio active people. I just had no idea with bio active that this was the intended result. Like omg flesh stripping bugs! This is what nightmares are made of for me LOL. I think I will stick to my potted live plants a plenty over here.

But seriously I do have a question in relation to this.... So with a bio active set up. Is it not dangerous for say a female cham laying her eggs down in the dirt with these things? Also what if a Cham has an illness and goes downhill very quickly wouldn't these things kill it off if it was laying on the ground?
 

dshuld

Chameleon Enthusiast
I totally understand the need for posting this. Absolutely will be great for the bio active people. I just had no idea with bio active that this was the intended result. Like omg flesh stripping bugs! This is what nightmares are made of for me LOL. I think I will stick to my potted live plants a plenty over here.

But seriously I do have a question in relation to this.... So with a bio active set up. Is it not dangerous for say a female cham laying her eggs down in the dirt with these things? Also what if a Cham has an illness and goes downhill very quickly wouldn't these things kill it off if it was laying on the ground?

I only use p.dilatatus and spring tails in my bio actives for the males. Females I only have springtails in with from a fear of the isopods getting to the eggs before I do. The p. dilatatus stay hidden for the most part during the day from what I've experienced over the last 15/ 16 months with my males that are bio active already though. Something else scary is from what I've read dwarf white can be almost as bad as p. scaber and they are a recommended c.u.c species :oops:.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
I only use p.dilatatus and spring tails in my bio actives for the males. Females I only have springtails in with from a fear of the isopods getting to the eggs before I do. The p. dilatatus stay hidden for the most part during the day from what I've experienced over the last 15/ 16 months with my males that are bio active already though. Something else scary is from what I've read dwarf white can be almost as bad as p. scaber and they are a recommended c.u.c species :oops:.
Wow ok so the key here is really knowing what the heck your doing. I have seen a few of y'all that really seem to know the ins and outs of bio active. Very impressive the knowledge y'all have. Thank you for answering my question. :)
 

dshuld

Chameleon Enthusiast
Wow ok so the key here is really knowing what the heck your doing. I have seen a few of y'all that really seem to know the ins and outs of bio active. Very impressive the knowledge y'all have. Thank you for answering my question. :)

I wouldn't say knowing exactly what you're doing because I certainly don't know all of the ins and outs myself lol. I do stalk the isopod groups on fb like I stalk the cham grps and here though hahaha. Tbh, of the 9 master cultures I have going, two have really surprised me. The p. ornatus and p. dilatatus tubs have barely touched their rats as of last night (first time giving any rats for the pic ops lol). The p. ornatus really surprised me with this since they are not a shy species from what I've gathered over the last 4/ 5 months having them. They behave similarly to p. scaber, are escape artists like p. scaber, breed as fast if not faster in my case as p. pruinosis "powder orange" but have similar eating habits to my p. dilatatus :confused:.
 
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Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
I wouldn't say knowing what you're doing because I certainly don't know all of the ins and outs myself lol. I do stalk the isopod groups on fb like I stalk the cham grps and here though hahaha. Tbh, of the 9 master cultures I have going, two have really surprised me. The p. ornatus and p. dilatatus tubs have barely touched their rats as of last night (first time giving any rats for the pic ops lol). The p. ornatus really surprised me with this since they are not a shy species from what I've gathered over the last 4/ 5 months having them. They behave similarly to p. scaber, are escape artists like p. scaber, breed as fast if not faster in my case as p. pruinosis "powder orange" but have similar eating habits to my p. dilatatus :confused:.
So they are cleaners right? That is why you have to feed them mice and stuff? When they are in a bio active set up do you have to do the same thing? Or are the mice just for pics to get an idea of how fast they can take apart something? Escape artists oh lord no lol.
 

dshuld

Chameleon Enthusiast
So they are cleaners right? That is why you have to feed them mice and stuff? When they are in a bio active set up do you have to do the same thing? Or are the mice just for pics to get an idea of how fast they can take apart something? Escape artists oh lord no lol.

The rats were just for the visual of something I tried to mention in another thread since p. scaber were recommended to @Brodybreaux25 . I'm on his ignore list though so Matt was kind enough to start this for me in hopes Brody sees the pics since that recommendation has been bugging me since then. Normally my master cultures only get pieces of cheese, dead discoids, the same veggies I use for the other bugs and repashy morning wood as far as beyond the leaf litter, cuddle bone, palm bark and cork bark. The ones in enclosures get cuddle bone, either a small piece of carrot or sweet potato to supplment the leaf litter, shed and poop.
 
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Goose502

Chameleon Enthusiast
I thought that first pic was a baby parrot! Lol! BSFL have quite the affinity to protein as well. I had a house gecko die in the enclosure(he was supposed to be food, but after a few weeks became another pet) and my cleanup crew had it down to bones in 2 days! BTW, he lived for over a year comfortably with my chameleon.
 

dshuld

Chameleon Enthusiast
72 hour comparions.

P. Ornatus "south/ yellow dot" - still nearly intact.

P. Pruinosis "powder orange" - oddly a species recommended for bio active c.u.c, is gone bones and all like the p. scaber "giant orange". There is probably close to 1000 or more in the tub though.

A. Maculatum- 45 adult/ sub adults in the tub, have not even touched it.

P. Hoffmanseggi

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P. Scaber giant orange, bones and all gone.
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P. dilatatus (giant canyons) still mostly there.
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P.scaber "dalmation" - not as aggressive as "giant orange"
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