Enclosed water resvoir with ro system. Thinking through complications a d how to setup properly.

SAYiWONT30

Member
So I have been plagued with lots of questions and planning out every detail for my build (still waiting on the frame from Ez tube) and I'm currently trying to figure out the misting/rain and the reservoir or the lack of one. In my mind I want to use a 15 gallon food grade barrel and install a bulkhead up top to feed 1/4 tubing in to fill the barrel directly from the ro system which would be under my kitchen sink. Then install the mitking bulkhead near the bottom for the MK pump which will sit below the barrel. I would like the Ro system to automatically fill the barrel gets low but I'm not certain how to do that. Also when the system is setup I wouldn't be opening the reservoir at all so it essentially is a closed off system in my mind but would I still need to be worried about bacteria in my reservoir? Am I missing anything? I still haven't figured out what pump to use for rain either. Ideally one that sits outside the reservoir like the MK pump, i may need a bleed off back into the reservoir though if pressure is to much for the 1/4 drip tubing.

I am open to better ideas. I have been working on this project for a long time lol and am very patient in getting everything perfect. If it costs more then so be it im not going cheap on any part of this build. If it makes more sense to show what I'm planning for the entire build then I can walk through every part of it. Nothing is set in stone yet I question myself on alot lol.
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
Ill throw a monkey into the wrench. A "mist king" is just the booster section of the RO system. You dont need a bucket if you can run the RO directly to the mistking pump. The only additional wiring needed is a valve that runs off the 12v ( think the new mistkings are 12v) or 120v that opens between the RO and mist king when its on.
http://www.eastcooler.com/water-purifier-parts/240-high-pressure-valve-for-water-purifier.html

They cost like 5 bucks.


In the normal world, the mistking pump would always be "on" and the nozzles dont exist. When you get a drink of water, an inline sensor goes off when it sees a pressure drop, and completes the circuit to the pump, and turns on the pump to "boost" the water pressure.

If you go a step further, if you have enough line pressure, you dont even need the pump at all :)
 
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SAYiWONT30

Member
Ill throw a monkey into the wrench. A "mist king" is just the booster section of the RO system. You dont need a bucket if you can run the RO directly to the mistking pump. The only additional wiring needed is a valve that runs off the 12v ( think the new mistkings are 12v) or 120v that opens between the RO and mist king when its on.
http://www.eastcooler.com/water-purifier-parts/240-high-pressure-valve-for-water-purifier.html

They cost like 5 bucks.


In the normal world, the mistking pump would always be "on" and the nozzles dont exist. When you get a drink of water, an inline sensor goes off when it sees a pressure drop, and completes the circuit to the pump, and turns on the pump to "boost" the water pressure.



I like that idea but then I'm still left figuring out how to do the rain. Maybe I just stick to the misters and worry about a dripper lol.
Also that sensor would go before the pump? So when the pump kicks on the sensor will open up until the pump kicks off then close off the supply? Is it better to have the sensor closer to the pump or the ro system?
 

SAYiWONT30

Member
I'm a hands on learner and can generally figure things out by messing with them but in this case I'd prefer to cry once and not be yelled at for water damage in the house
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
I like that idea but then I'm still left figuring out how to do the rain. Maybe I just stick to the misters and worry about a dripper lol.
Also that sensor would go before the pump? So when the pump kicks on the sensor will open up until the pump kicks off then close off the supply? Is it better to have the sensor closer to the pump or the ro system?

I got around the dripper problem, by having one nozzle in a bottle. So the mister goes off, mists, and fills the bottle, then when everything is off the bottle slowly drips till the next misting in a few hours.

As for the sensor, every RO system is a bit different.

For the classic version, You have the house water in, through some filters and the RO membrane. Then it comes out of "the system" and goes to your water spigot. In-between the system and the spigot people install a booster pump. after the pump there is a mechanical switch that is actuated with water pressure. So when you are not filling your glass, the pump is not running, and the switch "sees" at least 50 psi. When you start to fill your glass, the pressure the switch sees will drop to below 50 psi, it will complete the circuit, and cause the pump to turn on to boost the pressure.


What im suggesting is not using the booster pump, but instead use another optional part of the system. The electronic valve that is sometimes put inbetween the house water and the system. So now it goes house water, electric valve, system, same pressure switch, and out the spigot. When the spigot is open, the pressure drops, which causes the new valve to open till you finish filling your glass.

Instead what you would do is jimmy rig the new valve to simply turn on when the misting system is running. the new valve is "the pump". WHen the valve is open your misting nozzles should see within 30 psi of your house pressure, which normally is enough to run misters.


SOrry im not having any luck finding an infographic
 

SAYiWONT30

Member
I got around the dripper problem, by having one nozzle in a bottle. So the mister goes off, mists, and fills the bottle, then when everything is off the bottle slowly drips till the next misting in a few hours.

As for the sensor, every RO system is a bit different.

For the classic version, You have the house water in, through some filters and the RO membrane. Then it comes out of "the system" and goes to your water spigot. In-between the system and the spigot people install a booster pump. after the pump there is a mechanical switch that is actuated with water pressure. So when you are not filling your glass, the pump is not running, and the switch "sees" at least 50 psi. When you start to fill your glass, the pressure the switch sees will drop to below 50 psi, it will complete the circuit, and cause the pump to turn on to boost the pressure.


What im suggesting is not using the booster pump, but instead use another optional part of the system. The electronic valve that is sometimes put inbetween the house water and the system. So now it goes house water, electric valve, system, same pressure switch, and out the spigot. When the spigot is open, the pressure drops, which causes the new valve to open till you finish filling your glass.

Instead what you would do is jimmy rig the new valve to simply turn on when the misting system is running. the new valve is "the pump". WHen the valve is open your misting nozzles should see within 30 psi of your house pressure, which normally is enough to run misters.


SOrry im not having any luck finding an infographic


Ok i think i can figure that out. I was looking at the 150 GALLON PER DAY WATER SAVER DELUXE PLUS from Bulk Reef Supply if that helps with the automatic flush valve
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
I like your idea for the dripper as well



https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/sv-1-solenoid-valve-neptune-systems.html

You can use a different solenoid if you want. But basically this goes between the out of the system and the misters. You apply 24v and it starts misting. Most "pumps" are 24v. So you just have to replace the pump with this solenoid. If its still not enough pressure you can run the solenoid and pump at the same time.

One issue you will have is you may want to install some backups. If that valve fails, it will mist forever, just like an over flowing washer.

So you are basically using all the normal RO system parts, you are just rearranging them.
 

SAYiWONT30

Member
So for backups just add the same solenoid? So there will be 2 or 3 and put them all on a timer to turn on at the same time?
 
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