Egg control

Chameleon Nation

New Member
We have been experimenting with temps and food intake over the last year to see if it were possible to predict the amount of eggs laid. Here are some findings.

3-5 crix daily at 85F ambient temps, basking at 95F produced 15-20 eggs.
3-5 crix daily at 75F ambient temps, basking at 90F produced 10-15 eggs.

7-10 crix daily at 85F ambient temps, basking at 95F produced 30-40 eggs.
7-10 crix daily at 75F ambient temps, basking at 90F produced 20-30 eggs.

Tests were done on Ambilobe, Nosy Be, Nosy Faly, and Nosy Mitsio. In every case Ambilobe and Nosy Be produced 10-20% more eggs than Mitsio and Faly. Of the smaller clutches about 95% survived. Only 60-75% survived out of the larger clutches.

Smaller clutches produce larger eggs. Babies hatch out bigger and healthier.
 
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We have been experimenting with temps and food intake over the last year to see if it were possible to predict the amount of eggs laid. Here are some findings.

3-5 crix daily at 85F ambient temps, basking at 95F produced 15-20 eggs.
3-5 crix daily at 75F ambient temps, basking at 90F produced 10-15 eggs.

7-10 crix daily at 85F ambient temps, basking at 95F produced 30-40 eggs.
7-10 crix daily at 75F ambient temps, basking at 90F produced 20-30 eggs.

Tests were done on Ambilobe, Nosy Be, Nosy Faly, and Nosy Mitsio. In every case Ambilobe and Nosy Be produced 10-20% more eggs than Mitsio and Faly. Of the smaller clutches about 95% survived. Only 60-75% survived out of the larger clutches.

Smaller clutches produce larger eggs. Babies hatch out bigger and healthier.
Thats interesting thanks for sharing :D

Edit: It seem worth it to limit the intake and produce the smaller clutches that are stronger! Plus the easier on the chameleon it is.
 

Hoj

Friendly Grasshopper
cool bit of info Drew, any difference in ratio to males/females with the different temps
 

Chameleon Nation

New Member
The larger clutches with higher death rates seem to be mostly male deaths. In all cases there were more females than males that survived. Presently we are working on incubation temps to see if that makes a difference in the male to female ratio. Trying to see if the death rate changes aswell.

Some are incubating at 70-73F. Others at 75-80F. I am wondering if there will be more males in the warmer clutches? Hopefully we have good survival rates. All are without diapause. We believe in longer incubation periods.
 

Hoj

Friendly Grasshopper
The larger clutches with higher death rates seem to be mostly male deaths. In all cases there were more females than males that survived. Presently we are working on incubation temps to see if that makes a difference in the male to female ratio. Trying to see if the death rate changes aswell.

Some are incubating at 70-73F. Others at 75-80F. I am wondering if there will be more males in the warmer clutches? Hopefully we have good survival rates. All are without diapause. We believe in longer incubation periods.
i will be curious to see those results i belive temps dictate sex in many other reptiles like alligators.
 

Chameleon Nation

New Member
Steve Irwin did a study on crocs before he passed with different temps. Incubating at higher temps gave him roughly a 75-25 ratio. Male to female. It would be interesting to see if it happens with chams aswell.
 

bighutch917

New Member
We have been experimenting with temps and food intake over the last year to see if it were possible to predict the amount of eggs laid. Here are some findings.

3-5 crix daily at 85F ambient temps, basking at 95F produced 15-20 eggs.
3-5 crix daily at 75F ambient temps, basking at 90F produced 10-15 eggs.

7-10 crix daily at 85F ambient temps, basking at 95F produced 30-40 eggs.
7-10 crix daily at 75F ambient temps, basking at 90F produced 20-30 eggs.

Tests were done on Ambilobe, Nosy Be, Nosy Faly, and Nosy Mitsio. In every case Ambilobe and Nosy Be produced 10-20% more eggs than Mitsio and Faly. Of the smaller clutches about 95% survived. Only 60-75% survived out of the larger clutches.

Smaller clutches produce larger eggs. Babies hatch out bigger and healthier.
What about supplementation and gutload? Do you think those variables played a role as well?
 

Chameleon Nation

New Member
This is another variable we were thinking of trying. Gutload, in all cases was a variety of oranges, carrots, lettuce, potatoes and a few fruits. We give ours more D3 and multivitamin while prego. Calcium is another variable we are going to mess with.

There are so many variables that contribute to the amount of eggs produced. Same with raising chams to adulthood. Change their environment, food and nutrition and even stress will contribute to how chams will turn out.
 

Hoj

Friendly Grasshopper
Steve Irwin did a study on crocs before he passed with different temps. Incubating at higher temps gave him roughly a 75-25 ratio. Male to female. It would be interesting to see if it happens with chams aswell.
yes i have read this before that eggs lowwer in the ground will be male as they were incubated at a higher temp and cooler incubation will result in females.

here is a link i found
http://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=alligator egg temperature&source=web&cd=2&sqi=2&ved=0CDAQFjAB&url=http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/life/zoology/reptiles-amphibians/alligator4.htm&ei=JLp4T4KeDOakiQKgsbmnDg&usg=AFQjCNF4U-KiZ-DMIM0XuEIlfQWOzWcKsQ&sig2=5C_LaHrMn5s2Q8aLOUddOg

would be very cool to see if chams are effected this way
 

sdheli420

Established Member
nice info..always nice to see some numbers..

my jaw is open about the 95 degree basking temp and 85 ambient temps tho...mine would be going through water like cars in california eating through gasoline..:)
 

bighutch917

New Member
This is another variable we were thinking of trying. Gutload, in all cases was a variety of oranges, carrots, lettuce, potatoes and a few fruits. We give ours more D3 and multivitamin while prego. Calcium is another variable we are going to mess with.

There are so many variables that contribute to the amount of eggs produced. Same with raising chams to adulthood. Change their environment, food and nutrition and even stress will contribute to how chams will turn out.
I was just curious. We all know that it's not an exact science. Thanks for sharing the info.
 
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