Dark spot?????

Yarinil

New Member
Chameleon Info:
Your Chameleon - Veiled Cham, thinks is a male, 2-3 months (that was the breeder said) I'm taking care of him from april 11 (2 weeks)
Handling - daily... 1 time for feeding
Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders? Pinheads. 7 to 15 daily at 9 am and 10 am (two rounds) I'm giving the crickets fruits, peel potatoes and cricket food.
Supplements - 3 times a week Zilla's Calcium supplement. Not vitamin yet
Watering - Misting spray bottle, daily never seen drinking
Fecal Description - like a lizzards poop, black with a white tip


Cage Info:
Cage Type - Screened (homemade) round and is 17" x 36"
Lighting - Reptiglo Exo Terra UVB 5.0 25W and natural sun light (from the window)
Temperature - No basking spot, the temperature is like 80 to 85 F at night is 80 to 75 F (tropical island) Thermometer
Humidity - 60 to 80 with a hydrometer
Plants - Dendrobium orchids (2) and Epipremnum aureum (2)
Placement - near a window and is in front of the enter door
Location - Puerto Rico

Current Problem - I don't know if im overreacting but i saw some dark spot at his back and foots i will put some pictures about it maybe can help me know if is he or she :)
 

carol5208

Chameleon Enthusiast
In the last pics I see a little tarsal spur, so I say male. I could not see the spur in any of the other pics though. I don't see the spots???
 

Yarinil

New Member
In the last pics I see a little tarsal spur, so I say male. I could not see the spur in any of the other pics though. I don't see the spots???
If you see the first pic near his neck and shoulder looks like darker than the others... idk maybe i'm overreacting???:confused:

yeah .. yeah, I'm new mother.. first cham lol i'll make everyone crazy in this forum lol

how do you see him? healthy?
 

Lovereps

Avid Member
It could be a bruise or, if crickets are left in his cage, they may be biting him while he sleeps at night.

The natural sun light from the window might not be so good.
Chameleons need a basking spot so they can warm up enough to digest and absorb the nutrients from the feeders.
When sunlight travels through glass, it converts the UV rays into heat--and that might be making his cage too hot at times.
It is good that you have a UVB bulb for him.
Chameleons are a bit more delicate than many other types of reptiles, so it is very important to make sure that temperatures and humidity are in the right range and that supplements are not given too often or too infrequently.
Chams enjoy lots of foliage to hide behind and feel safe.
Veiled chams are known to eat their plants. You can offer him some fruits and vegetables, in addition to his feeder insects.

Please read this excellent Veiled caresheet for more details:

https://www.chameleonforums.com/care/caresheets/veiled/
 

Yarinil

New Member
Thanks a lot!

It could be a bruise or, if crickets are left in his cage, they may be biting him while he sleeps at night.

The natural sun light from the window might not be so good.
Chameleons need a basking spot so they can warm up enough to digest and absorb the nutrients from the feeders.
When sunlight travels through glass, it converts the UV rays into heat--and that might be making his cage too hot at times.
It is good that you have a UVB bulb for him.
Chameleons are a bit more delicate than many other types of reptiles, so it is very important to make sure that temperatures and humidity are in the right range and that supplements are not given too often or too infrequently.
Chams enjoy lots of foliage to hide behind and feel safe.
Veiled chams are known to eat their plants. You can offer him some fruits and vegetables, in addition to his feeder insects.

Please read this excellent Veiled caresheet for more details:

https://www.chameleonforums.com/care/caresheets/veiled/
Not glass windows... they are screened windows and i didn't offer him a basking spot because i read that for his age they dont need it yet and the temperature may be too hot because I'm from a tropical island and is always hot so i try to have it like 80 F. If i use a basking spot tthe temperature would rise quickly in all the enclosure maybe a 25W will be enough? remember the temperature in PR is always like 80 to 95 sometimes 98 and the lowest is 75 to 70 at night. (on spring and coolest summer)

I'm supervising his feedings because the pinheads are too tiny and they may escape if i let them be in his enclosure, so i'm taking the cham out of his enclosure and put him with his crickets in a glass aquarium till he finish his "hunt" then i put him again in his screened enclosure.

I do see crickets walking on him but he "shake" and take them off. I'm spraying calcium to his pinheads 3 times per week its good enough or too much?
 

Lovereps

Avid Member
Not glass windows... they are screened windows and i didn't offer him a basking spot because i read that for his age they dont need it yet and the temperature may be too hot because I'm from a tropical island and is always hot so i try to have it like 80 F. If i use a basking spot tthe temperature would rise quickly in all the enclosure maybe a 25W will be enough? remember the temperature in PR is always like 80 to 95 sometimes 98 and the lowest is 75 to 70 at night. (on spring and coolest summer)

I'm supervising his feedings because the pinheads are too tiny and they may escape if i let them be in his enclosure, so i'm taking the cham out of his enclosure and put him with his crickets in a glass aquarium till he finish his "hunt" then i put him again in his screened enclosure.

I do see crickets walking on him but he "shake" and take them off. I'm spraying calcium to his pinheads 3 times per week its good enough or too much?
Screen windows are a different story.
People in suitable climates often house their chams in outdoor screen enclosures.

The calcium can and should be used at nearly every feeding because it is just calcium--it does not contain vitamin D3.
He also needs a multivitamin dusting of his food once every 2 weeks.
If he gets at least an hour each day of natural sunlight, then he will not need to receive any vitamin D3 supplement.
You should add more variety to his diet by giving him silkworms, hornworms, dubias, phoenix worms, etc.
In nature, chameleons eat a wide variety of insects that have eaten nutritious foods--and this is what cham owners should try to do.


Please read this caresheet because it has much more info and, unlike much of what people are told by petstore employees or read in other places on the internet, it is good , reliable care info:
https://www.chameleonforums.com/care/caresheets/veiled/

Please read this one about foods to use:
https://www.chameleonforums.com/care/food/
 

Yarinil

New Member
I'm still trying to find a person who sell super worms here cause the person who sells me crickets just sell a lot i have 500 pinheads for one chameleon... and he sells 500 worms... i thinks is too much...

still working on the vitamins and i put him for about 30 mins outside...

i read that links already but thanks :D i reading them again to make sure i learn ALL i have to learn :p

i still dont find any link about fruits that i can give him and orchids that i can use for his enclosure.
I have a small guava tree. Maybe i can use the fruits for him? if you find a link about guava trees and orchids please let me know!
 

Lovereps

Avid Member
Superworms are an "OK" food but are rather high in fat and low in calcium.
Silkworms, hornworms and phoenixworms are all higher in calcium and lower in fat.
One thing that is good about the superworms is that they can live for a few months if you feed them (you should feed your feeders nutritious foods anyway).
Many, if not most of us, have to mailorder feeders.
I don't know if that is a problem for P.R.
Places like this one:
http://www.mulberryfarms.com/
or
http://www.coastalsilkworms.com/
or
http://www.phoenixworm.com/servlet/StoreFront

I actually looked for info on the orchids but didn't find any.
What chams do appreciate is lots of leaves to hide behind/blend in with.

The second link I gave you does not list specific fruits or vegetables but
I'm not aware of any fruits or vegetables that cannot be fed to chams.

FWIW, the mutivitamin that I use is this one
http://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-Repti...67021582&sr=8-1&keywords=reptivite+without+d3
 

Yarinil

New Member
OMG! Thanks!

Superworms are an "OK" food but are rather high in fat and low in calcium.
Silkworms, hornworms and phoenixworms are all higher in calcium and lower in fat.
One thing that is good about the superworms is that they can live for a few months if you feed them (you should feed your feeders nutritious foods anyway).
Many, if not most of us, have to mailorder feeders.
I don't know if that is a problem for P.R.
Places like this one:
http://www.mulberryfarms.com/
or
http://www.coastalsilkworms.com/
or
http://www.phoenixworm.com/servlet/StoreFront

I actually looked for info on the orchids but didn't find any.
What chams do appreciate is lots of leaves to hide behind/blend in with.

The second link I gave you does not list specific fruits or vegetables but
I'm not aware of any fruits or vegetables that cannot be fed to chams.

FWIW, the mutivitamin that I use is this one
http://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-Repti...67021582&sr=8-1&keywords=reptivite+without+d3

If i dont find any supplier here (i think is not problem to find it) then i'll order online, yes i have 2 orchids 2 pothos and i'll go shopping for ficus or hibiscus i also have 2 dracaena outside the enclosure and planning on make another enclosure for the outside to take him for a "sun-tan"

how do you see me? I'm doing good? I'll have to add more plants, multivitamins and another feeders.

How about the basking spot and my climate of my country?
 

Lovereps

Avid Member
A young Veiled cham like yours really can't tolerate temperatures in the 90s for very long, although it can be done after he is much older.

South Florida weather is very similar to the weather in many parts of Puerto Rico, but I think PR is even a little hotter than South Florida.

Here are a couple of posts and, if you use the search button, you will find many more useful posts:

https://www.chameleonforums.com/florida-heat-question-66923/

https://www.chameleonforums.com/chams-outside-florida-time-yr-60319/


I do know that any cham taken outside for natural sunlight needs to be able to go into the shade whenever he wants to.

With the few changes already suggested and using caution about temperatures, I think you'll be a successful chameleon keeper.
 

Yarinil

New Member
A young Veiled cham like yours really can't tolerate temperatures in the 90s for very long, although it can be done after he is much older.

South Florida weather is very similar to the weather in many parts of Puerto Rico, but I think PR is even a little hotter than South Florida.

Here are a couple of posts and, if you use the search button, you will find many more useful posts:

https://www.chameleonforums.com/florida-heat-question-66923/

https://www.chameleonforums.com/chams-outside-florida-time-yr-60319/


I do know that any cham taken outside for natural sunlight needs to be able to go into the shade whenever he wants to.

With the few changes already suggested and using caution about temperatures, I think you'll be a successful chameleon keeper.

Right now he's been keep in 80's temperatures I was concerned about outside so i'll put a LOT of plants for him. Also I bought another plants today and the multivitamins :) in spray... Zilla's same brand of the calcium I'm using

I'm still searching for more feeders so i can add to his diet and some fruits too :)
 
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