CLIMATE OF THE NATURAL HABITAT OF THE MIGHTY YEMEN CHAMELEON

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
When I asked the question about the longevity of the Yemen chameleons in Europe I was hoping for a different kind of detail....like...in Europe...
What specific lights do they use? Where are they placed?
What supplements and how often for each?
What do they feed the insects and what insects (scientific names please) do they feed the chameleons?
When are the basking lights on and at what temperature is the basking area and is it at the top of the cage?
Etc. Etc.

I've literally talked to john courtney smith(european, someone that has been a guest on CBP multiple times) over PM on a different forum about supplementation. What he suggested wasn't much different than what they do here regarding that.
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
I have explained already
they keep them according to the climate in Yemen
Do not overheat them
Do not overfeed Them And keep them in enclosures on a average double size than in the US
It is illegal to let them suffer in bad conditions and rhe law is executed

Usually it seems people underheat them if we're going by their natural habitat. Almost everyone here has their cages at room temp or lower if they have AC with just a warm basking spot allowing them to choose that spot. I linked the exact place that you showed us in another thread and there is an average of 83 degrees at their hottest month, same here where I live, and half our month was in the 90s. So to just have a spot around 85-90 and the rest being 70s, I don't see how that'd be a huge problem. But I'm not against going lower either, just saying. (Btw with this said. I could understand the argument they're deeper in the forest or near a stream where it would be cooler, but then the daytime humidity would probably be higher too)

I do agree about the overfeeding. Overweight veileds are pretty common. Don't seem to see it as much with other species.
 

PetNcs

Chameleon Enthusiast
When I asked the question about the longevity of the Yemen chameleons in Europe I was hoping for a different kind of detail....like...in Europe...
What specific lights do they use? Where are they placed?
What supplements and how often for each?
What do they feed the insects and what insects (scientific names please) do they feed the chameleons?
When are the basking lights on and at what temperature is the basking area and is it at the top of the cage?
Etc. Etc.

you will be surprized, there is nothing extremely special, on contraryC
All simple
Rhey i. Principle 100% follow my care sheet or other way around, their care is fully reflected in my care sheet which is so strongly wuestioned in the US

the key issues:
Basking spot not higer than 80
Basking limited to two seberal minutes long periods per day
Nigjttime drop significant in the 60s, in winter in 50s
Simulating of low temp wintertime fir se eral
Months
No forcing females lay eggs several times per year
Pollen fed
Daily calcium fed
UV lamps often HQI or Linear T5HO
Size of the cage iminimum according to governmental guidelines, it means fir Yemen often 3,5ft by 4ft by 4 ft
Only living plants
Usually bioactive
Foggernin in ise, no spraying at daytime,
If st all only outside of basking lights on
Stapple food usually Grullus assimilis, often BSF
But not BSFL
Not handled at all
No experiments with complex and absurd gutloading, just wuality feeding of feeders and gutload with pollen

as I say,do not think they do something magic, they just Strictky follow meaningful guidelines and Yemens ezceeding 10yrars are a standard
 

PetNcs

Chameleon Enthusiast
Usually it seems people underheat them if we're going by their natural habitat. Almost everyone here has their cages at room temp or lower if they have AC with just a warm basking spot allowing them to choose that spot. I linked the exact place that you showed us in another thread and there is an average of 83 degrees at their hottest month, same here where I live, and half our month was in the 90s. So to just have a spot around 85-90 and the rest being 70s, I don't see how that'd be a huge problem. But I'm not against going lower either, just saying. (Btw with this said. I could understand the argument they're deeper in the forest or near a stream where it would be cooler, but then the daytime humidity would probably be higher too)

I do agree about the overfeeding. Overweight veileds are pretty common. Don't seem to see it as much with other species.

on contrary, Insee them heavily overheated with basking ligts baking them all day long.
Be xareful with reliable source of data about the climate. Even BBC server mistakenky does not show ibb but about 700km distant Saudi Arabian station Khamis Mushait woth much warmer weather.

moreover, with citing the weather you name, you refer to the three hottest months of the year only, the weather in the rest of the year is significantly colder,
So pardon me, but i really thinknit is absolutelyninadequat to take as benchmark for their wellbeint the hottest heather ever and add 5 degrees more and thi k thisnis optimum. Itnis not

it causes soeeeding the metabolism and early aging
Inevitably
 

NashansCamos

Chameleon Enthusiast
Almost everyone here has their cages at room temp or lower if they have AC with just a warm basking spot allowing them to choose that spot.
I vaguely remember @PetNcs said something about how veileds get confused because in the wild if they want to bask they go to the left or right of the tree to get the sunlight, not up and down. Can you explain more and am I remembering correctly?
 

PetNcs

Chameleon Enthusiast
I vaguely remember @PetNcs said something about how veileds get confused because in the wild if they want to bask they go to the left or right of the tree to get the sunlight, not up and down. Can you explain more and am I remembering correctly?

sure
Why should the bush inhabiting chameleons climb up to bask? There is no rationale
They go tk the closest place where they are exposed to the sun, means to the side to get out of the shade of the bush. The tempnis same on basking spot 2m above ground and 20. Absolutely same

this is why they are confused in captivity when we force them to climb up for heat, as it is unnatiral.

actually, IMHO they climb ip more to get more ligjt as our cages are very dark at the bottom (the higher indoor xage, the darker down there) and get too much exposure to heat not eillingly just because of staying in the iluminaged - and heated area
 

Hydra_cosplay

Avid Member
Heya so I own a veiled as well, and from what I've been gathering from this post thus far that I want to be sure of is the basking. I need to be limiting the time my basking light is on correct?
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
on contrary, Insee them heavily overheated with basking ligts baking them all day long.
Be xareful with reliable source of data about the climate. Even BBC server mistakenky does not show ibb but about 700km distant Saudi Arabian station Khamis Mushait woth much warmer weather.

moreover, with citing the weather you name, you refer to the three hottest months of the year only, the weather in the rest of the year is significantly colder,
So pardon me, but i really thinknit is absolutelyninadequat to take as benchmark for their wellbeint the hottest heather ever and add 5 degrees more and thi k thisnis optimum. Itnis not

it causes soeeeding the metabolism and early aging
Inevitably

I don't disagree with anything you're saying and I definitely agree with a lot of it. I just struggle to see how a small warm area would harm them so much if the rest is cool. It could simulate a sunny day where the light/heat is breaking through the trees, no? And usually cooler temps coincide with higher humidity from more trees/plants, I would think at least.

I do agree cage sizes are probably all too small recommendations.

Personally, I think bioactive is overlooked too much as just an option rather than a beneficial addition. I feel it would help their immune systems along with putting them at ease with a more natural setting. It's starting to catch on here slowly, but surely. I remember when I started bioactive I think almost 4 years ago almost nobody did it and a lot of people were still warning of its dangers. Cool to see how far we've come in just that time though.


Lastly I'll say, I think another big impact on shorter lifespans could just be the quality of veileds here. Our pet stores are mostly garbage. Many breeders are too. The animals come from unhealthy lineage, are nutrient deficient, etc..
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
I've literally talked to john courtney smith(european, someone that has been a guest on CBP multiple times) over PM on a different forum about supplementation. What he suggested wasn't much different than what they do here regarding that.
Thanks @jamest0o0
you will be surprized, there is nothing extremely special, on contraryC
All simple
Rhey i. Principle 100% follow my care sheet or other way around, their care is fully reflected in my care sheet which is so strongly wuestioned in the US

the key issues:
Basking spot not higer than 80
Basking limited to two seberal minutes long periods per day
Nigjttime drop significant in the 60s, in winter in 50s
Simulating of low temp wintertime fir se eral
Months
No forcing females lay eggs several times per year
Pollen fed
Daily calcium fed
UV lamps often HQI or Linear T5HO
Size of the cage iminimum according to governmental guidelines, it means fir Yemen often 3,5ft by 4ft by 4 ft
Only living plants
Usually bioactive
Foggernin in ise, no spraying at daytime,
If st all only outside of basking lights on
Stapple food usually Grullus assimilis, often BSF
But not BSFL
Not handled at all
No experiments with complex and absurd gutloading, just wuality feeding of feeders and gutload with pollen

as I say,do not think they do something magic, they just Strictky follow meaningful guidelines and Yemens ezceeding 10yrars are a standard
Thank you Petr....this is more what I was looking for!

When I first started keeping Yemen chameleons back in the 90's I worried that I wasn't keeping them warm enough but they did well with a basking temperature in the very low 80'sF and they did well with the lower amount of food I fed them as adults.
I still couldn't get the females to consistently live past 7 though...but I didn't use bee pollen :( Although I gutloaded the insects well with healthy veggies, greens, etc. I guess it wasn't enough. Very few people could keep them alive here then so I had nobody to learn from here...it was all by hook or by crook. I didn't run
afoggerat at night either. It took time to learn what worked and what didn't....sadly for the chameleons at the start...but I always told people what I did as I figured things out...so I may have "saved" a few too.
 
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