Chameleon Burn Urgent!!!!!!!!

I have an ambilobe male who has had a "history" of skin "defects". When i first purchased him, he started to devlope what seemed to be a burn on his side. It didnt get worse, but i treated it with Neosporin. Just the other day, i noticed it happened to his spikes on hisback, and now some have literally worn off. It is spreading.

Could this be skin rot?

Any help would mean the world!

Thanks/please,
-Jake
 
I just looked up pics. on google. It looks somewhat like this(which is a burn). I am going to adjust his set-up and tempurature tonight and see if it helps. I also put Neosporin on the wounds.

-Jake
 

chameleon76

New Member
I am sorry to hear about your problem.Hear is my experience.My sambava got burnt it was a total accident.I was devistated first pic it turned bright color for a while then it turned white when the old skin died then it scabed in pic 2.The best thing to do is let the scab fall off on its own.I also treat with neosporin or other triple antibiotic cream.its been a over a year they take along time to heal completely if ever.final pic3 is today.He is healthy in every way and has healed alot .I hope this can help good luck and keep us posted
Kevin
chameleon76
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I may take it to the vet. Chameleon 76, my chameleons "burn" is not white, but black...and only one part has scabbed, also...the back looks exactly like your chameleons back! Maybe the burn was not as bad, and more quicly resulted in that typeof texture, color, Ect.

I will see how it progresses within the next couple days.

Thanks,
-Jake
 

Fate X

New Member
my veiled fireball got some minimum thermal burns back in october when she was maybe 3-6 weeks old. i had used neosporin type stuff then i got some silvadene cream and it worked good at speeding up the healing and preventing a infection.
 

FaunaBgirl

New Member
I'd be suspicious of what is going on underneath the black. And if it is spreading, it's not good. You may need an internal antibiotic from the vet, as well as the (light applications) of neosporin.
 

Dave Weldon

Avid Member
Howdy Jake,

Post some photos of the skin damage. I'm suspicious that it might be something other than a burn... maybe fungi/bacteria...? Plan on a vet visit either way. As was mentioned, it may require an injectable drug to treat it.

I recommend that anyone visiting their chameleon vet, ask if they will provide you with a prescription for Silvadene or it's generic equivalent - Silver Sulfadiazine. It is a good antibiotic cream that many vets use for burns and small skin injuries and just handy to have around.
 

Dave Weldon

Avid Member
Howdy Jake,

The recommended chameleon vet in your area is: Dr. Daniel Reimer at Adler veterinary clinic on Roscoe and Balboa. Ask to see him. I've heard good things about him from several independent chameleon experts. I'd be sending you to Dr. Geek in Yorba Linda if I thought you'd go 50 miles...:).
 

Mylo124

Member
Hey. Im sorry to hear about your cham, that really sucks. I hope all is well with him now. I was reading your advice and story about what happened when i came across the point when you said you put triple antibiotic ointment on his burn. Just wondering a stupid question, but was this just the regular stuff for humans? And to clarify, no harm is at risk for the cham when using it, right? I have a male jacksons and just in case anything happens...i want to be prepared.
Thanks.
-Liz
 

pepezkakap

Member
I am sorry for your Cham. Hope it's well treated now.

I am really confuse guys about the whole burnt things. I am glad I don't have to use any form of light. But just in case, what's the best safe distance of basking light and UVB light to the top of the cage? I don't see the point of distance to the highest basking spot as Cham can climbed to the toppest part of the screen unless it's glass enclosure.

Secondly, I assume all animal has instinct, why Cham can't decide if it's too hot for them and just make proper distance to absorb the heat without causing them any burnt?

Hope you guys have the answer. Thanks.
 

Solid Snake

Avid Member
First off, this thread is from 2007 :mad:

However, we will forgive Mylo124/Liz, as it is their first post, for resurrecting the thread. :rolleyes:

Secondly, I assume all animal has instinct, why Cham can't decide if it's too hot for them and just make proper distance to absorb the heat without causing them any burnt?

Hope you guys have the answer. Thanks.

Now, they dont generally experience temps hot enough to burn them in the wild, its not something they really have to worry about.
Thus, no need to evolve any sort of trigger for whether or not their flesh is cooking. Thats the basic reason this type of thing happens.

If you place a frog, in luke warm water, and crank the heat, it will boil alive before it hops out, because it doesnt know any better.

If temperatures are not monitored, and kept in check, the chameleon will cook itself.

It doesnt matter how far away the basking lamp is, that is variable.

What matters is that the highest temperature that the chameleon has physical access to, is constantly monitored, and kept at a reasonable measurement.

That point for this particular chameleon, would generally be no higher than 95F-35C. That should be the highest temperature the animal has access to, period. Even if it can only access it by climbing on the screen, upside down, and really pressing its belly to it.

At the same time, the chameleon should have access to a temperature gradient, from the (no higher than) 95F-35C, all the way down to (around) 75F-24C.
 

pepezkakap

Member
First off, this thread is from 2007 :mad:

However, we will forgive Mylo124/Liz, as it is their first post, for resurrecting the thread. :rolleyes:



Now, they dont generally experience temps hot enough to burn them in the wild, its not something they really have to worry about.
Thus, no need to evolve any sort of trigger for whether or not their flesh is cooking. Thats the basic reason this type of thing happens.

If you place a frog, in luke warm water, and crank the heat, it will boil alive before it hops out, because it doesnt know any better.

If temperatures are not monitored, and kept in check, the chameleon will cook itself.

It doesnt matter how far away the basking lamp is, that is variable.

What matters is that the highest temperature that the chameleon has physical access to, is constantly monitored, and kept at a reasonable measurement.

That point for this particular chameleon, would generally be no higher than 95F-35C. That should be the highest temperature the animal has access to, period. Even if it can only access it by climbing on the screen, upside down, and really pressing its belly to it.

At the same time, the chameleon should have access to a temperature gradient, from the (no higher than) 95F-35C, all the way down to (around) 75F-24C.

Thanks for the insight. It becomes clearer to me. Will not post furthermore and will let this thread RIP again ;)
 
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